The Power of Meter & Rhyme

I recall once finding a book of “nursery rhymes” for my children. The “rhymes”, which they weren’t, were a free verse compendium of new “nursery verse” [?] for children, but my children were utterly perplexed and the collection (which I can’t even remember the name of) was swiftly relegated to the dust bunny pile. It seems that some gaggle of 20th century poets didn’t get the memo as concerns rhymes (or meter for that matter). What makes nursery rhymes fun is their rhyme and meter. Likewise, what makes a limerick a limerick is it’s rhyme and meter. Try out a free verse limerick in your local pub and it won’t be long before you’re thrown out with the spoiled milk. There’s no such thing as a free verse Limerick, or Villanelle or Sonnet (despite what modern anthology editors would like you to think). Rhyme and meter is integral to their form. What children learn from Mother Goose is that rhyme and meter are what makes language memorable and also what makes poetry poetry.

little-jack-horner

Notice the repetition of meter in lines 1 & 2 and lines 4 & 5. Notice how the iambic pie/I rhyme ties together lines 3 & 6.T.S. Eliot, in the midst of The Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock, beautifully exploits the lessons of the nursery rhyme for the two lines:

women-come-go

And it’s the memorability of rhyme and meter that makes it powerful and dangerous—that makes authoritarian governments not only suppress such meter, rhyme and poetry but to threaten and even murder the poets they perceive as rivaling their propaganda. The United States is not immune to such authoritarian impulses. And that makes the power of rhyme and meter, as a means of challenging government ideology and propaganda all the more necessary. Suppose, for example, a profoundly corrupt and fascistic political party were to almost unanimously support the overthrow of your Democracy by insurrection; were to unanimously endorse the elevation of ideologically driven individuals to branches of government with the power to enforce, by judicial fiat, their personal religious beliefs over the people’s constitutional rights, or were to use government as a means to curtail your ability to vote, to censor and direct what your children are taught in educational institutions, to intrude in your personal life and decisions? Then, having learned the lessons of the nursery rhyme, you might chant the following while defending your rights, your freedom, and the Constitution:

fuck-church

7 responses

  1. But what if
    I love meter and I love rhyme
    And also love my MAGA hat?

    Love “The Donald” and Patrick too
    Though one could wear his tan
    More orange?

    Like

    • You’re in luck! There’s a right wing, reactionary poetry site called “The Society of Classical Poets”, where “classical poets” extol the second amendment, the lost cause, God, women, men and nothing in between. Because, as we all know, free verse is a Godless leftist conspiracy and the only thing standing between that and God is rhyme and meter.

      Like

  2. I have just discovered your blog and I am beyond grateful for your poetry resources… am currently applying for university and this is a LIFE SAVER

    Like

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