June26th 2016

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still
····burning into the humid night—a handful
········of stars
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233 June 26th 2016 | bottlecap
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4 responses

  1. What does the average temp run day/night this time of year in Vermont? And do you have gnats, deer flies or mosquitoes? Are there venomous snakes? And do you ever need air conditioning?

    • Normally in the upper seventies, but we’ve been having some days in the high 80’s and low 90’s. That kind of heat is usually reserved for the third week in August. We don’t really have gnats. We have deerfly, but it’s not all that common to be bitten. They tend to peak for about a week and then go away. The mosquitoes don’t pick up until July, usually, but they’re ruthless (gotta’ make up for a short season). They come in waves, different hatches as summer progresses; and specializing in different times of day — some fast and some slow. The blitzkrieg, fast mosquitoes show up toward the end of August. They’re wicked fast. There are copperheads up here, but you have to try, really, really, really hard to be bitten. We personally don’t need air-conditioning, though there are plenty of Vermonters who use it. It’s not a necessity. The temperature usually drops to the mid 50’s or low 60’s at night — even on a 90 degree day. Two good window fans (not the useless box fans) can drop the temperature of a house by 20 degrees in a matter of minutes (by the time evening rolls around); and the house will hold on to those cool temperature through most of a hot day.

  2. Interesting. Deer flies, mosquitoes, snakes, gnats, and lately fire ants here in droves. Just missed a copperhead peck two years in a row walking a firelane, treatment for which can run up to $120,000 dollar with anti-venom. And some people would die without AC although I try to stay used to the heat by not using the AC. Below 80 and I need a blanket. And of course we have ticks and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. But no Lyme Disease I’ve heard of –that seems more prevalent the farther North you go. I had gathered from your haiku that in Vermont nature probably impresses the poetic sensibility more positively than it does here. Keats wouldn’t need a can of OFF! deep woods to write “To Autumn” there.

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