Vermont Poetry Newsletter • July 28 2011

[The Vermont Poetry Newsletter is not issued by me but by Ron Lewis, by whose permission I post this. PLEASE NOTE: I have edited his newsletter so that links are provided rather than text. If I cannot find a link, I will either omit the relevant portion of the newsletter to avoid copyright violations, or I will provide an alternate link. Please contact Ron Lewis if you would like to receive his Newsletter in full. All images are linked.]

Vermont Poetry Newsletter

Your Poetry & Spoken Word Gateway
In The Green Mountain State

July 27, 2011 (Previous issue: 05/22) –

In This Issue:

  1. About VPN
  2. Newsletter Editor/Publisher’s Note
  3. Writing Assignments/Suggestions/Exercises/Prompts
  4. Poets House Reading + Display of All the Poetry Books Published In the Last Year!!
  5. Bookstock in Woodstock
  6. All Ages Slam in Barre, July 29th
  7. BigTown Gallery Poetry Reading Series
  8. Support Your Vermont Lit Mags
  9. The Why’s of Joining Writing Groups
  10. From the Enchanted Tower to the World of Po-Biz
  11. NEPC – The New England Poetry Club
  12. WordTemple Poetry Series Audio Recordings
  13. Poetry Northwest Journal Revived
  14. University of California Press Suspends Poetry Series
  15. The History of English in Just 10 Minutes
  16. The Subversive Character of Prose Poetry, Part I
  17. The Subversive Character of Prose Poetry, Part II
  18. Why We Keep Rereading Donald Justice
  19. Nature Poetry at Audubon Zoo
  20. Poetry Society Lobbied by Red Wheelbarrow
  21. Walt Whitman@TweetsofGrass
  22. Expressing Loss, Anger Through ‘Slam’ Poetry
  23. The Milosz Road: From Origins to Global Fame
  24. New Book By David Budbill
  25. The Unforgiving Cinderblock
  26. Lightsey Darst, Poet and Dancer
  27. Letter From Poland: On Translating Poetry
  28. Sculpture of Exiled Poet Brodsky Graces U.S. Embassy
  29. Barzakh, New Literary Journal; Marilyn Hacker Interview
  30. Burlington Book Festival
  31. Brattleboro Literary Festival
  32. 2011 Lecture Series @ Vermont Studio Center
  33. Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference 2011
  34. Great Poetry Links: Onomatopoetic Words
  35. Poetry Quote – Robert Frost
  36. Linebreak Poem
  37. American Life in Poetry Poem
  38. US Poets Laureate List
  39. Vermont Poet Laureates
  40. US Poet Laureates From Vermont
  41. New Hampshire Poet Laureates
  42. US Poet Laureates From New Hampshire
  43. Contact Info for Editor/Publisher of VPN: Ron Lewis
  44. Vermont Literary Journals
  45. Vermont Literary Groups’ Anthologies
  46. Vermont Poetry Blogs
  47. State Poetry Society (PSOV)
  48. Year-Round Poetry Workshops in Vermont
  49. Other Poetry Workshops in Vermont
  50. Year-Round Poetry Writing Centers in Vermont
  51. Other Writing Groups in Vermont
  52. Poetry Event Calendar

1.) About the Vermont Poetry Newsletter Network

The Vermont Poetry Newsletter Network is made up of people of all backgrounds, ages and skills who appreciate the craft of poetry and want to promote it in the beautiful state of Vermont. This network consists of workshops, open mics, poetry performances and other literary events, providing opportunities to meet local poets, talk about and enjoy poetry, and motivate and inspire yourself in whatever writing projects you are involved.

The mission of the Vermont Poetry Newsletter is to foster the poetry arts community in the Green Mountain State, home to more writers and poets per capita than any other state in the nation.  Its goals are to serve as a resource for and about VT poets; to support the development of individual poets; and to encourage an audience for poetry in Vermont.

Dating from 2009, the Vermont Poetry Newsletters are being archived on a blog maintained by poet Patrick Gillespie at PoemShape.

2.) Dear Friends of Poetry:

It’s well past 2 in the morning, and I’m wrapping up another newsletter for you.  I shouldn’t be up this late, but I need to finish this project so that I can put my mind to other equally important projects.  And, I should be taking better care of myself, as I was just diagnosed as having Lyme Disease.  I was in Stage 2, covered with rashes or hives.  Seems I was bit by an infected tick, which was probably in my gardens.  I’ve been in these same gardens for some 31 years, and have never seen a tick yet.

Wouldn’t you know it, though, as only 3 days after my blood test came back positive for Lyme, while upstairs on our office computer researching the disease, a tick, of all things, comes walking along my thumb!!  I was so flabbergasted that I bottled it up and took it over for a friend to positively identify, he having pulled several from his legs over the years from hiking an endless number of peaks and trails.  Of course, it was indeed a tick.  What are the chances of that happening, I ask?

So, I’m on a high dosage of antibiotics for some 6 weeks, at least.  It’s been 3 weeks, and I’m glad to say that I have my strength back and am feeling well.

Next week, I’ll be going to Stellafane, the oldest and largest telescope-making and stargazing convention in the world, which is held right here in Vermont.  Since I’m the president of an astronomy club, going to Stellafane is a given.  As always, I can’t wait for their Swap Tables, which begin (by flashlight!) at 5:00 a.m. sharp!  I’m going to try and escape from Stellafane for a few hours to go to Bookstock (in Woodstock) later on the 30th, then to BigTown Gallery for a poetry reading on the 31st.  Then, I’m due to meet the very next day at the Vermont Arts Council as a panel member to assist in choosing Vermont’s next poet laureate.  That’s a busy schedule for a sick man!  Wish me well.

Ron Lewis
VPN Editor/Publisher
(802) 247-5913
vtpoet@gmail.com

3.) WRITING ASSIGNMENT • SUGGESTION EXERCISES

OTTER CREEK POETS EXERCISES & ASSIGNMENTS

RECIPE

Pick 3 stories from Google News. Using only words that occur in the first 3 paragraphs of each story, make a poem with 3 stanzas, 3 lines each, no more than 60 characters per line. The 3-word title should use a word from each story.

(Exercise given by http://3by3by3.blogspot.com/)
PREVIOUS WRITING ASSIGNMENT • SUGGESTION • EXERCISE • PROMPT

Good Luck!

4.)

  • Only 5-1/2 hours drive from VT, and you can look through every poetry book published during the last year!!  (A NY event, but I couldn’t help myself!)

Poets House Showcase Reading

Featured Poets: Rachel Eliza Griffiths, Albert Mobilio, Jena Osman & Evie Shockley

July 26, 2011, 7 p.m.
Poets House, 10 River Terrace, New York, NY
Free and open to the public.

Experience the breadth and diversity of contemporary poetry today with this exciting display of all the poetry books published in the United States during the last year. From micro-press chapbooks to CDs to volumes from major commercial publishers, over 2,000 poetry titles are gathered together at Poets House. In conjunction, Showcase Readings will feature poets reading from newly published books.

Info:
(212) 431-7920
info@poetshouse.org
http://www.poetshouse.org/

5.)

Bookstock in Woodstock VT
Friday – Saturday, July 29- 30, 2011
The Green Mountain Festival of Words
Web Site: http://bookstockvt.org/

Bookstock, now in its third year, celebrates the written and spoken word for all ages and in all genres, free and open to the public.   Fiction, non-fiction and poetry authors of national and regional renown are included.   Workshops will be held on a variety of topics, as well as a show of book art.  Book sales, vendor exhibits and music will take place on the town Green. Over twenty authors of national and local renown will speak, read from their work, offer interactive programs and mingle with the participating public. Take part in workshops, and visit with exhibitors, new and second hand book sales, and diverse cultural events including art and music. All events open and free to the public.

Press and all other inquiries
contact Peter Rousmaniere pfr@rousmaniere.com

A Poetry Slam will take place on Friday, July 29, 8:00 p.m. at a private dining room above Bentley’s.

Four major poets will be reading 12 PM – 4 PM on Saturday, July 30:

David Budbill

One of Vermont’s most cherished poets, David is the author of seven books of poems, eight plays, a novel, fiction, essays, and is a performance poet on two CDs. Garrison Keillor reads frequently from David’s poems on his National Public Radio program The Writer’s Almanac. Among David’s prizes and honors are a Guggenheim Fellowship in Poetry and the Vermont Arts Council’s Walter Cerf Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Arts.

Reading Sat July 30 at 12 – 12:45 PM Windsor County Courthouse

Cleopatra Mathis

Bookstock is proud to have Dartmouth professor Cleopatra Mathis read from her works. She is the author of numerous collections of poetry, including What to Tip the Boatman? (2001), which won the Jane Kenyon Award for Outstanding Book of Poems.  The NY Times Book Review wrote, “[Cleopatra Mathis’ poetry] enthralls without throwing the reader off a cliff. And all the while she brandishes the gifts of a talented poet who has hit her stride.”  She directs the creative writing program at Dartmouth.
Reading Sat July 30 at 1 – 1:45 PM Windsor County Courthouse

Wesley McNair

Often referred to as “a poet of place,” New Hampshire native Wesley McNair captures the ordinary lives of northern New Englanders while writing about family conflict and other autobiographical subjects. He has lived for many years in Mercer, Maine, and has authored more than half a dozen collections of poetry. He has received many fellowships  Wesley has taught for several decades and is currently professor emeritus and writer in residence at the University of Maine at Farmington.
Reading Sat July 30 at 2 – 2:45 PM Windsor County Courthouse

Sharon Olds

Sharon Olds is one of contemporary poetry’s leading voices. Winner of several prestigious awards, including the National Book Critics Circle Award, Sharon is known for writing intensely personal poetry which graphically depicts family life as well as global political events.   One reviewer for the New York Times said, “Her work has a robust sensuality, a delight in the physical that is almost Whitmanesque. She has made the minutiae of a woman’s everyday life as valid a subject for poetry as the grand abstract themes that have preoccupied other poets.” Her National Book Critics Circle Award-winning volume The Dead and the Living (1984) has sold more than 50,000 copies, ranking it as one of contemporary poetry’s best-selling volumes. She has been poet laureate of New York State.

Reading Sat July 30 at 3 – 3:45 PM Windsor County Courthouse

Peter Money

Peter Money, poet, will introduce the poets.  Director of Harbor Mountain Press, he teaches locally at the Center For Cartoon Studies and at Lebanon College.  His books to date include These Are My Shoes, Minor Roads, A Big Yellow, Instruments, Between Ourselves, Finding It: Selected Poems, To day-Minutes only, and the hybrid poetic fiction Che. His next book, translations with Sinan Antoon of Saadi Youssef’s new poems, is forthcoming from Graywolf Press.  He is married to Norwich Public Library Director Lucinda Walker, who is a panelist at Bookstock.

Reading information not available.

To read some of their poetry, go to these sites:

There will be 4 venues at Bookstock:

  • The Town Hall for the 2 plenary sessions
  • The Norman Williams Library Mezzanine and Library Reading Room for adult readings, its      History Room for Workshops
  • The Woodstock History Center for children’s and adult authors, its Barn Gallery for workshops
  • The Courthouse for the Poetry readings (*All poetry readings to happen here, from noon to 4 or 5.  See listing above.)

Here is a short list of interesting exhibitors who will be present:

  • Bloodroot Literary Magazine (Visit Bloodroot on Saturday, July 30 between 10 AM and 5 PM.  They’ll be on The Green under the tent at table #4.)
  • The Salon: A Journal of Poetry & Fiction
  • Local poet Carole Soloff
  • Tupelo Press

6.)

All Ages Slam!
Aldrich Library, Barre
Friday, July 29th
6:30 p.m.

Free pizza is served at 6:30, followed by a quick writing exercise, which sometimes yields slammable results, and of course you’re encouraged to bring your best work that can be presented in 3 minutes or less. Should you write something terrific during the 7-minute writing exercise, you can choose whether to read from a prepared or brand-new manuscript!  Bring your friends and family; this is part of Barre’s weekend celebration!  This event is directed by Slam Master Geof Hewitt.  Info, Geof.Hewitt@myunion.edu.

7.)

BigTown Gallery
99 North Main Street
Rochester, VT
767-9670

SUMMER 2011 READING SERIES CONTINUES:

ELLEN BRYANT VOIGT
Sunday, July 31, 2011
7:30 – 8:30
Tickets $15 – Call 802-767-9670 or e-mail to reserve

TRACY WINN & JOAN HUTTON LANDIS
Sunday, August 14, 2011
5:30 – 6:30
Free & Open to the Public

NATHALIE ANDERSON
Sunday, August 21, 2011
5:30 – 6:00
Book signing hosted by Kathryn Schenkman, Penstroke Press
Free & Open to the Public

8.)

  • Help support your Vermont Literary Magazines!  Yes, we’re indeed fortunate to have 16 lit mags published in our tiny state!

Subscribe to any of these:

9.) The Why’s of Joining Writing Groups

  • I’m always suggesting that my readers find and join a writing group within a reasonable driving distance.  (The Otter Creek Poets have members from NY, NH and it seems every corner of VT.)  The following quote is from someone who writes poetry and found the critiquing skills of many of her peers to be uniquely helpful alongside her own. This is from an article I suggest you read, that might make you bite the bullet on this idea. ~ Ron

“I have found that a peer group of poets and gifted individual readers have been invaluable to my growth as a writer. Sometimes I’m too close to a poem, and these readers can see that it is encoded, and only I know the code. A few months ago, I wrote a poem entitled “I” about Chang and Eng, the Siamese twins, which I brought to my critique group. Of course it would be obvious to my peers that I was writing in the voice of Eng longing to be his own person, free of his brother, and not physically attached. Although my critique group members found the prosody compelling, they thought I was writing about incest or the relationship of two individuals engaged in emotional conjoinment. The group feedback clarified what was needed to make the conceit that worked figuratively, also work literally.”

10.)

  • The following comments by this poet at “Her Circle Ezine” struck me as to why I belong to groups of poets who help me in critiquing my own work, that it is such a difficult job when faced to do it alone.  I think you’ll enjoy reading this and might even end up purchasing the book of poetry.  ~ Ron

From the Enchanted Tower to the World of Po-Biz
BY MELISSA CORLISS DELORENZO

I recently completed a poetry manuscript that took me almost eight years to finish. The working title is “A Good Time To Die.” The manuscript is now in cyberspace and in hardcopy at a number of presses. I love being immersed in a manuscript. I listen for the voice that tells me an idea, a fragment, a title, or a phrase that will become the seed for a poem or a collection. Most recently, I have conceived of my poems as linked, in sequence, each one building on the next. My first two poetry collections (Box Poems, Alice James Books, and In the Margins of the World, Plain View Press) were comprised of poems untethered to each other, and only later shaped into a cohesive work. My last collection, Storytelling in Cambodia, Calyx Books, is a series of linked poems that journey from Cambodia’s ancient mythic times to the killing fields and then to the U.N. presence during Cambodia’s first free elections in the 1990s. In it I tried to bear witness to the plight of the Cambodian people and to all who have endured holocausts. (….)

11.) The New England Poetry Club (NEPC)

  • The New England Poetry Club (NEPC), which bills itself as the oldest poetry reading series in the country, is offering some very interesting readings in July and August, if you want to visit or travel to Cambridge, Mass, in what they call the Longfellow Summer Reading Series.

Sunday, June 26th 4pm GOLDEN ROSE READING NAOMI SHIHAB NYE

Sunday, July 24th 4pm Poets Who Edit_With JOHN BARR (Poetry Magazine, author of Hundred Fathom Curve,  and Grace) And STANLEY MOSS (editor of Sheep Meadow Press, and author of Rejoicing, and God Breaketh Not All MenÍs Hearts Alike)

Sunday, August 7th 4pm WESLEY MCNAIR, Lovers of the Lost_FRANZ WRIGHT Walking to Martha’s Vineyard read from forthcoming works.

Sunday, August 14th 4pm Where Do Poems Come From? On August 14th they will come from DIANA DER-HOVANESSIAN (Dancing at the Monastery), X.J. KENNEDY (In A Prominent Bar in Secaucus, New and Selected Poems),  and F.D. REEVE (The Puzzle Master)*

Sunday, August 28th 4pm Editors of The Art of the Sonnet, STEPHEN BURT and DAVID MIKIKS, and poet FORREST GANDER

*Note: F.D. Reeve is a poet from Vermont.  The Puzzle Master is his latest work.

12.) WordTemple

  • I know I’ve found several wonderful online sites for my readers in the past, but this next one certainly ranks as one of the very best.  It’s run by Katherine Hastings, from Santa Rosa, California (a town in which my in-laws used to live).  Here’s a bit about Ms. Hastings:

Katherine Hastings, a poet and resident of Santa Rosa, grew up in the Cow Hollow neighborhood of San Francisco.  Founder of the popular WordTemple Poetry Workshops, Hastings believed that Santa Rosa would support a long-term poetry series if she could bring well-established poets into the area. She began planning for  the WordTemple Poetry Series at the end of 2005 and opened the series to a standing-room only crowd in February 2006 with poets Jane Hirshfield and David St. John.

Hastings hosts a radio program, also called WordTemple, on Santa Rosa’s NPR affiliate, KRCB 91.1 FM. WordTemple airs on the third Wednesday of each month from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. To listen on-line go to http://www.krcb.org; to listen via iTunes go to Radio/Public/KRCB; for Comcast Cable in Sonoma County, tune in to channel 961.
Hastings gives readings frequently in the San Francisco Bay Area and has had poems published in numerous journals and anthologies including The Comstock Review, Parthenon West Review, CALYX, Rattle, and others. She also has several chapbooks; her first nationally published chapbook, Updraft, was released by Finishing Line Press in 2010.   Her collection Fog & Light will be published by Ahadada Press later this year. Hastings earned her MFA in Writing from Vermont College and serves as a contributing editor for Hunger Mountain – A Journal of Arts and Letters.   For a schedule of her readings, contact her at khastings@wordtemple.com

Source: feed://media.krcb.org/podcasts/word_temple/Word_Temple.xml

13.) Poetry Northwest journal revived at Everett Community College

Poetry journal founded by Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Carolyn Kizer is back in the Northwest, where it belongs.

By Mary Ann Gwinn
Seattle Times book editor

Poet Carolyn Kizer has led an extraordinary life. She won the 1985 Pulitzer Prize for her poetry volume, “Yin.” She was the first director of literature programs at the National Endowment for the Arts. A translator of Urdu, Chinese and Japanese poetry, she taught poetry at a series of prestigious institutions: the University of Iowa, Washington University, Stanford University.

She isn’t writing poetry now; at 86, her health is frail, says her son-in-law David Rigsbee. But recently Kizer was presented with a gift that represented a resurrection of sorts: the latest issue of Poetry Northwest, the poetry journal she co-founded in 1959. (….)

14.)

University of California Press to Suspend Acclaimed Poetry Series
July 15, 2011
By Peter Monaghan

One of the country’s most prominent poetry series, New California Poetry, from the University of California Press, is to be suspended. The pause in publishing, after next year’s three spring titles, likely will become long-term or permanent unless an angel steps forward to provide substantial assistance.
The series, founded in 2000, has published 33 titles by 25 poets, with three more in the pipeline. Its editors have been four prominent figures in innovative American poetry: Cal Bedient, Forrest Gander, Robert Hass, and Brenda Hillman.
Alison Mudditt, who took over as UC Press director early this year, said today, via e-mail: “Like all university presses, we are currently facing increasing financial pressures, partly as we continue to feel the impact of the global economic recession and partly as we reshape our publishing program and our organizational structure to ensure our continued success in the digital age.” (….)

15.)

Shakespeare

The History of English
in Just Ten Minutes

School’s out, and if you thought learning was boring, check out the funny animated bard (actually, it’s only one minute, sixteen seconds on this YouTube fragment).

16.)

The subversive character of prose poetry
Part I

I would have placed emphasis on the subversive character of prose poetry. For me, it is a kind of writing determined to prove that there’s poetry beyond verse and its rules. Most often it has an informal, playful air, like the rapid, unfinished caricatures left behind on café napkins. Prose poetry depends on a collision of two impulses, those for poetry and those for prose, and it can either have a quiet meditative air or feel like a performance in a three-ring circus. It is savvy about the poetry of the past, but it thumbs its nose at verse that is too willed and too self-consciously significant. It mocks poetry by calling attention to the foolishness of its earnestness. Here in the United States, where poets speak with reverence of authentic experience and write poems about their dads taking them fishing when they were little, telling the reader even the name of the river and the kind of car they drove that day to make it sound more believable, one longs for poems in which imagination runs free and where tragedy and comedy can be shuffled as if they belonged in the same pack of cards. (….)

17.)

The subversive character of prose poetry
Part II

Prose poetry has often mystified me, usually in a good way. I first encountered it reading the French Symbolists, before stumbling across contemporary practitioners like Russell Edson, Robert Bly, and Simic himself. And while I was tantalized by the magic of the Symbolists (in translation) I was flat out puzzled by some of the contemporary work, especially that which Simic here describes as “a three-ring circus.” No matter. I believe that Simic is on to something when he makes the case that prose poems hinge on a merging of the poetic impulse in the guise of a prose (not narrative) style, and that this is done in order to undercut, or, to use his word, subvert the heightened effect of the poetic impulse. In other ways, it questions the basic tenets of the line break when not dictated by form (i.e., free verse). If a free verse poem is set up in a prose paragraph, how will it be heard differently by the listener? Conversely, I am reminded of the time I submitted a poem in blank verse to several journals before it was accepted when I had recast it (with no other changes) as a prose poem.
More to the point, Simic’s claims that the prose poem puts the emphasis rightly on the poetry and not on the form, and that one of the main impulses is to escape all labels, are not only valid claims, but they go a fair way toward a presentation of this hybrid genre that, for me at least, gives it some definition and relief. ~David Sanders

18.) Why we keep rereading Donald Justice

Written by Jeff Charis-Carlson

“Donald Justice is dead,” Donald Justice himself wrote toward the middle of his poem “Variations on a Text by Vallejo,” which was included in his 1973 collection, “Departures.”

That sentence took on new meaning in 2004, when the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and longtime Iowa City resident died just a few weeks before the publication of his “Collected Poems,” which provided a 300-page distillation of a lifetime’s worth of work from a man often hailed as a “poet’s poet.”

While still in mourning for the poet, devoted readers that year were given a single volume in which they could travel from Justice’s early work in the 1960 collection “The Summer Anniversaries” (“Great Leo roared at my birth”), through his mid-life poems the 1967 collection “Night Life” (1967) (“Men at forty / Learn to close softly / The doors to rooms they will not be / Coming back to”), through his experimental poems in “Departures” (“This poem is not addressed to you”), through his 1987 collection “The Sunset Maker” (“Nostalgia comes with the smell of rain, you know”) through the new poems included among his later selections (“O prolong / Now the sorrow if that is all there is to prolong”). (….)

19.)

Nature poetry fits right in at the Audubon Zoo
By Sheila Stroup, The Times-Picayune

Look carefully on your next visit to the Audubon Zoo, and you’ll discover poetry scattered from the old zoo entry all the way to the Louisiana Swamp. The poems and excerpts are small treasures to make you pause for a moment and consider the beauty of nature.

Some, like Emily Dickinson’s Hope is the thing with feathers That perches in the soul, you’ll recognize. Others, you may not. This one-line gem by Turkish poet Nazim Hikmet hangs on two gently-curving signs below the limb of a live oak near the African Savannah: My heart on a swing touched the sky.

“At 6:30 in the morning, when I like to come out here, the light goes through it,” Brenda Walkenhorst said, looking up at the poem. “It changes as the light changes throughout the day.”

Walkenhorst, the zoo’s director of education, was showing me some of the 32 installations that are part of the Language of Conservation initiative, which was funded by the Institute for Museum and Library Services and led by Poets House NYC in partnership with the New Orleans Public Library.

20.)

Poetry Society lobbied by red wheelbarrow
By Alison Flood

so much depends
upon

a red wheel
barrow

at the Poetry Society
in London

Disgruntled poets channeled William Carlos Williams yesterday when they delivered a red wheelbarrow carrying members’ signatures to the Poetry Society, demanding its board of trustees explain what lies behind a recent spate of high-level departures.

Poet laureate Carol Ann Duffy is just one of 423 members to have added their names to a campaign for the Poetry Society to explain itself after its chair, director, finance manager and president all resigned. (….)

21.) Walt Whitman

@TweetsOfGrass Under your boot-soles

1855 Leaves of Grass, little by little, over and over.

Go to: http://twitter.com/#!/TweetsOfGrass

22.)

Expressing loss, anger through ‘slam’ poetry
By Sarah Hoye

Philadelphia (CNN) — Alana Gooden never thought she would live to see her 18th birthday.

Her brother died in a car accident when she was 12 years old and the emotional impact lingered in the family for years.

By the time Gooden had reached her junior year in high school, her world came crashing down. After a falling out with her mother, she moved in with a friend and her family in poverty-stricken North Philly.

She started cutting class, and went from her high school’s honor roll to failing.

Danger became a real part of her everyday life: She helplessly watched a man open fire on a crowd outside a corner store where she had stopped for hoagies with a friend.

She even considered selling drugs to make ends meet.

23.)

The Milosz Road: From Origins to Global Fame

Kaunas, 4 July 2011 – On 29 June, guests from the United States of America, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Poland, Sweden, Israel and Lithuania became pilgrims of The Milosz Road who visited some of the most significant locations marked in Czeslaw Milosz’s biography, remembering the poet’s life and works.

The journey following the road of the great author was just one of the international events on 26 June – 2 July in Vilnius, Kaunas, Seteniai and Krasnogruda, dedicated to the commemoration of the 100th birth anniversary of the Nobel Prize in Literature Winner, VMU Honorary Doctor Czeslaw Milosz. The Milosz Road told audiences about the life, the works and the indelible contribution of the great Polish writer in the context of cultural life worldwide.

The Milosz Road Was Interesting and Diverse

After 2011 was declared the Year of Czeslaw Milosz, Prof. Avizienis started looking for ways and opportunities to hold events that would speak about this person who is so near and dear to Lithuania and Poland. “The program of events of The Milosz Road was interesting and diverse: a conference took place, a visit was paid to Milosz’s hometown, where a wood sculpture exhibition had been updated for the occasion, also a scientific study was prepared, analysing Milosz’s journey in life and work. One exhibition was based on the study – the main stages of Milosz’s life and features of his works were presented, paying the most attention to his Lithuanian origins and revealing his relation to the small homeland”, the first Rector of the re-established Vytautas Magnus University, Prof. Algirdas Avizienis, explained. (….)

24.) New Book by David Budbill

[Paperback] Copper Canyon Press,160 pp., $16.00

David Budbill continues his popular poetic ruminations on life in remote New England-an outward survey of a forested mountain and an introspection of self-reliance, anonymity, and the creative life. Inspired by classical Chinese and Japanese poets, Budbill contemplates the seasons, ambition, his questionable desire for fame and fortune, and simple, focused contentment: “Weed the beans. Pick the peas.”

Source: http://www.spdbooks.org/Producte/9781556593741/happy-life.aspx

25.)

The Unforgiving Cinderblock
By Barbara Berman

Dunn doesn’t do dazzle, though he duly honors those whose large, obsessive stars have burned brightly.
Born in 1939, Stephen Dunn is one of the more consistently satisfying poets of his generation. There is a stately bravery in the way he observes and experiences feeling, and What Goes On-Selected and New Poems, 1995-2009, is a welcome compilation, meaty and well crafted. He doesn’t always declare fresh news, as in his discussion of the virtues of restraint, a tool I believe gets less respect than it should. In ”Ars Poetica” his questioning and diction make the entire poem stirring, some stanzas especially so :

Yet what could awe us now?
The feeling dies
and then the word.
Restraint. Extravagance. I liked
how one could unshackle the other,
that they might become indivisible.

These lines help define what makes his poetry so rewarding. In his understanding of passion, structure and energy, he can bring to mind what a limber, dedicated ballet dancer does in the task of interpreting material and engaging an audience. (….)

26.)

Lightsey Darst, poet and dancer: “If your process isn’t changing, it is not a good sign”

Who is Lightsey Darst? Well, besides her work as a dance critic, faculty member at MCAD and North Hennepin Community College, and host of The Works: A Writing Salon, she is also the winner of the Minnesota Book Award in Poetry for Find the Girl (published by Coffee House Press), her first full poetry collection. She was also a participant in the most recent Twin Cities edition of Literary Death Match, where although she didn’t win, she stood in excellent command of the stage, reading selections from her book while wearing a powerfully intimidating birdcage skirt, which accompanied the theme of her poems as well as perfectly as about any item of clothing possibly could. She is also a fantastic conversationalist.
Last week, I was lucky enough to sit down with Lightsey Darst and talk. Speaking with Darst, the daughter of a city planner and a botanist, is embarking on a trip through controlled wilderness-there are clear paths, and places to adventurously stray, but never a way get dreadfully lost. When I complimented her on her skill as an interviewee, she admitted that she knows how difficult it can be to interview, and thus tried to practice being more or less an open book (so to speak) when being interviewed. I really appreciated this about her. (….)

27.)

LETTER FROM POLAND: ON TRANSLATING POETRY
by poetryinternational

Jacek Gutorow_Opole, Poland

I’m reading some Polish poets in English translation and asking myself: how to verbalize one’s intention in language? How to articulate and, at the same time, preserve something that emerges as inarticulate, wanting in words and basically having the aspect of the thing which is yet to be expressed? Very often first poetic impulses are vague. There is something preceding words – the very intention which anticipates language. Is this anticipation fulfilled when we write a poem? Rather not. Turn your intention into words and sooner or later you discover that you have been betrayed by them.

This is precisely the effect of translation. While being transferred onto the level of articulation (which is unavoidably linear and limited by the choice of words), first intentions are somewhat flattened and subdued. You imagined your poem to be more comprehensive, more abundant and grander. But it is not. It is just a shadow of your initial design. A compromise. (….)

28.)

Sculpture of exiled poet Brodsky graces U.S. embassy
By Galina Masterova

The statue pays tribute to the Nobel-Prize winning poet who was sent into permanent exile, only to become America’s darling and U.S. poet laureate.

In a courtyard off a boulevard that hums with traffic is a giant new statue of a poet who never asked to leave and never returned when he had the chance. The vast figure of Nobel-Prize winning laureate Joseph Brodsky stands on a granite base looking up to the sky just off Novinsky Boulevard, yet his eyes appear to be closed. Nearby are sculpted silhouettes of twelve people in two groups, but Brodsky seems unaware, lost in his thoughts, clothes somewhat crumpled, hands in his pocket.

Brodsky was one of Russia’s greatest poets of the 20th century, mentored as a young man by the grand dame of poetry, Anna Akhmatova. Yet he chose his own restless path early on. It was for this individualistic choice, anathema in the Soviet Union, that he was first put on trial in 1964 for “parasitism” and charged with being a “pseudo-poet in velveteen trousers.”

29.)

  • Only 3 issues old, here is a literary journal worth looking into for submissions or for a subscription.  I pulled out an interesting interview with Marilyn Hacker (below) for you to get a flavor of this new journal. — Ron

Barzakh

Barzakh is a biannual multi-genre journal with an internationalist stance. Emerging out of the English department at the University at Albany, SUNY, our focus is on innovative poetics, in keeping with a tradition of forward-looking department-based journals that spans from Don Byrd’s co-editorship of Jed Rasula’s Wch Way in the 1970s to The Little Magazine in the 1990s (our first issue features an interview with Rasula, and issues of both journals will be made available in our archive). We envisage the archive as a way to bring together our various departmental projects and initiatives, past and present, and to connect them to analogous or anomalous ventures elsewhere in the rhizomatic spirit of crossings that is Barzakh. Ours is not an “ism” but as an “isthmus” (see below) that links disparate articulations (between tongues, between histories) in the interplay of text, sound, and image. Welcome to “Barzakh”

“Barzakh”

: a word / concept that names the connecting link, the “between” of something, such as different spheres of existence. As a temporal concept it can be, and historically was, considered an interval of time — say, the time between death and Resurrection in the Qu’ran, similar to the Bardo Thödol of the Tibetans, or the travel between life and death as the Egyptians imagined it. The Arabic word has the literal meaning of “barrier,” “veil,” “curtain.” Thus traditionally seen as a separator, it is however also and more interestingly thinkable as a “between” that links, and in that sense can be translated as “isthmus.” 

For the great Arab mystic & poet Ibn Arabi, Barzakh is a kind of purgatory—the temporary and yet historical place which constitutes this, our world where we live and love and labor, aware that what we need most to find our way through is what the poet John Keats called “negative capability,” i.e., the ability “of being in uncertainties, mysteries, doubts, without any irritable reaching after fact and reason.” The idea of the Barzakh is thus not to map a territory but to travel along boundaries, criss crossing always-to-be-redefined regions, in the process creating rhizomatic assemblages, de- and re-territorializing language-intensities as shifting fields of forces.

An interview with Marilyn Hacker, as conducted by KC Orcutt for Barzakh.

KCO: How does fluency in French and in English influence your approach to writing, especially in relation to form and in rhythm?
MH: Sometimes forming a phrase expressing an idea or an opinion, I am drawn to one language over the other. But I don’t, in general, “hear” French when I’m writing poetry in English. French forms are to a great degree syllabic rather than metrical: you can find a great variety of metrical possibilities in the twelve-syllable alexandrine. There are many many fewer poets working in fixed forms in French than there are in English (and of course I include British, Irish, Canadian, Australian, West Indian poets among the Anglophones, and Maghrebian, Canadian, Martiniquais, Middle Eastern – et de suite – poets among the Francophones), or than there are in Russian, Hungarian or Spanish, though there are some fascinating resistances to the hegemony of vers libre, ranging from Jacques Roubaud and Jacques Réda to Marie Etienne and Valérie Rouzeau.
KCO: Do you separate the two cultures in your mind? How do you decide when to mix in slang terms or cultural phrases into a piece? Do literal translations or details ever take control or distract your writing?

30.)

Burlington Book Festival
Fri, Sep 23 thru Sun Sep 25

The city’s seventh annual celebration of the written word is on the way. September 23 through 25 enjoy readings, signings, panels, workshops, exhibits, musical performances, demos and special events featuring literary luminaries from around the world-and just around the corner! All events are free and open to the public. This year’s headliners include Elinor Lipman, Ed Koren, Marie Howe, Douglas Kennedy, C. D. Wright, David Macaulay, Spencer Quinn, Myla Goldberg, John Elder Robison, Cynthia Lord and Philip Levine.

The Burlington Book Festival is copresented by Burlington Magazine and The Stern Center for Language and Learning. For a schedule and list of participants or to volunteer, you can call 802-658-3328 or read all about it at burlingtonbookfestival.com.

31.)

Brattleboro Literary Festival
Fri, Oct 14 thru Sun, Oct 16

The Brattleboro Literary Festival celebrates its 10th anniversary with over 40 emerging and established authors in readings and special events. Featured authors include fiction authors André Aciman, Julia Alvarez, Richard Bausch, Anthony Doerr (winner- 2011 Story Prize), Téa Obreht (winner – 2011 Orange Prize) and Luis Alberto Urrea; poets Stephen Dobyns, Mark Doty (winner -2008 National Book Award) Monica Youn and Kevin Young, Caldecott Award-winner and Norwich, VT resident David Macaulay; and NPR personalities Tom Bodett and Roy Blount, Jr. Free and open to the public. Info, http://www.brattleboroliteraryfestival.org.  (Poets are bolded above and listed with their bios below.)

2011 Brattleboro Literary Festival Poets:

Julia Alvarez is the author of five books of fiction, including How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents and In the Time of the Butterflies, as well as a book of essays, five collections of poetry, and work for younger readers, including Return to Sender and the Tia Lola stories. Her honors include being a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, winning the F. Scott Fitzgerald Award for Outstanding Achievement in American Literature, and being named Latina Magazine’s “Woman of the Year.” She lives in Vermont, where she is a writer-in-residence at Middlebury College.

Jeanne Marie Beaumont is author of Burning of the Three Fires, Curious Conduct, and Placebo Effects, winner of the National Poetry Series. She co-edited The Poets’ Grimm: 20th Century Poems from Grimm Fairy Tales. Her poems have appeared in numerous publications including Good Poems for Hard Times, The Manhattan Review, The Nation, Poetry Daily, The Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror 2007, and World Literature Today. She won the 2009 Dana Award for Poetry. She lives in Manhattan and teaches at the Unterberg Poetry Center of the 92nd St. Y and in the Stonecoast MFA program.

Stephen Dobyns is the author of fifteen books of poetry, including Concurring Beasts, a National Poetry Series award winner; Cemetery Nights, a Mellville Cane Award winner; and most recently, Winter’s Journey. He is also the author of a collection of essays on poetry entitled Next Word, Better Word, and twenty-one novels, many of which are thrillers or mysteries. The recipient of a Guggenheim Foundation fellowship and three grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, Dobyns is currently on the faculty at the Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers.

Mark Doty’s Fire to Fire: New and Selected Poems won the National Book Award for Poetry in 2008. His eight books of poems also include School of the Arts, Source, and My Alexandria. He has published four volumes of nonfiction prose as well. His numerous awards include the National Book Critics Circle Award, The Los Angeles Times Book Prize, a Whiting Writers Award, two Lambda Literary Awards, the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for First Nonfiction, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. Doty is the only American poet to have received the T.S. Eliot Prize in the U.K.

Martín Espada has published seventeen books as a poet, editor, essayist, and translator. His work has been translated into ten languages, and collections of his poems have recently been published in Spain, Puerto Rico, and Chile. The Republic of Poetry received the Paterson Award for Sustained Literary Achievement and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. His most recent collection, The Trouble Ball, was just released this spring. A former tenant lawyer, Espada is a professor in the Department of English at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

Lenelle Moïse, the 2010-2012 Poet Laureate of Northampton, Massachusetts, and the spring 2011 Performance Artist in Residence at Northwestern University, is a spoken word poet, a playwright, a musician and a performance artist. Her jazz-infused and hip-hop bred poetry explores Haitian-American identity, creative resistance, and the intersection of race, class, gender, sexuality, and spirit. Moise has released several CDs featuring her performance poetry and poly-rhythmic music.

Lawrence Raab is the author of seven collections of poems, most recently The History of Forgetting. In addition, with Stephen Dunn he has published a chapbook of collaborative poems, Winter at the Caspian Sea. Raab was a finalist for the National Book Award in 1993, and a National Poetry Series winner for What We Don’t Know About Each Other. His poems have appeared in several editions of Best American Poetry and in Garrison Keillor’s Good Poems. He lives in Williamstown, Massachusetts, where he is the Morris Professor of Rhetoric at Williams College.

Luis Alberto Urrea was born in Tijuana to a Mexican father and an American mother. He is the author of The Hummingbird’s Daughter, Across the Wire, By the Lake of Sleeping Children, Into the Beautiful North, and the graphic novel Mr. Mendoza’s Paintbrush. The Devil’s Highway, a true story about a group of illegal immigrants, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction. His fiction, poetry, and journalism have also been recognized with a Lannan Literary Award, a Christopher Award, the Kiriyama Prize, an American Book Award, and a Western States Book Award. Urrea lives outside Chicago and is a professor at the University of Illinois.

Ellen Doré Watson’s fourth and most recent full-length collection of poems is Dogged Hearts. Her honors include a Massachusetts Cultural Council Artists Grant, a MacDowell Colony Fellowship, and a National Endowment for the Arts Translation Fellowship for The Alphabet in the Park: Selected Poems of AdŽlia Prado. She serves as Director of the Poetry Center at Smith College, poetry and translation editor of The Massachusetts Review, and teaches on the faculty of the Drew University Low-Residency MFA program in poetry and translation.

Monica Youn is the author of two books of poetry: Ignatz, which was a finalist for the National Book Award in 2010, and Barter.  She has been awarded fellowships from the Library of Congress, the Rockefeller Foundation, and Stanford University, where she was a Stegner fellow. She is currently the Brennan Center Fellow in Constitutional Law at NYU Law School. Her work there has been recognized by the New Leaders Council, which named her one of their 40 Under 40 nationwide leaders for 2010.

Kevin Young is the author of seven books of poetry, most recently Ardency: A Chronicle of the Amistad Rebellion, which has been featured on NPR.  His Jelly Roll: A Blues, was a finalist for the National Book Award and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and winner of the Paterson Poetry Prize.  His book The Grey Album: Music, Shadows, Lies won the 2010 Graywolf Nonfiction Prize and is forthcoming in 2012. He is the Atticus Haygood Professor of Creative Writing and English, as well as Curator of Literary Collections and the Raymond Danowski Poetry Library at Emory University in Atlanta.

  • All I can say is WOW!  What a lineup!  Please visit their awesome web site, too!  I’m finding time to go to this event even if I have to crawl there! — Ron

32.) Vermont Studio Center Lecture Series Recordings

Although the Vermont Poetry Newsletter lists all the poets who come to read at the Vermont Studio Center, there are other visiting artists and writers that I do not mention in the Poetry Event Calendar that you might be interested in hearing.

Visit their website and 2011 Lecture Series at: http://www.vermontstudiocenter.org/visiting-artists-writers/

33.)

  • Here’s the list you’ve been waiting for; get your books out to be signed!  I’ll keep you alerted to any Special (poetry) Guests (like Stanley Plumly last year) and the exact reading schedule for the Conference) ~ Ron

Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference 2011
August 10-20

(The first scheduled event is a welcome and reading at 8:15 PM on August 10; the last day of the Conference, August 20, is a travel day.)

POETRY

Marianne Boruch is the author of six poetry collections, most recently Grace, Fallen from and Poems: New and Selected, and two books of essays, Poetry’s Old Air and In the Blue Pharmacy.  A memoir, The Glimpse Traveler, is forthcoming, as is The Book of Hours, a collection of poems. Her awards include fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and National Endowment for the Arts, and residencies from the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center and Isle Royale National Park. She developed the MFA program at Purdue University, serving as its first director from 1987 until 2005, where she remains on faculty. Since 1988, she has also taught at the Warren Wilson MFA Program. She’s been awarded a Fulbright-Visiting Professorship in the U.K. for spring 2012, where she will be teaching and writing at the University of Edinburgh.

Louise Glück won the Pulitzer Prize for The Wild Iris in 1993. The author of ten books of poetry and one collection of essays, Proofs and Theories: Essays on Poetry, she has received the Bollingen Prize, the Wallace Stevens Award, and the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for Nonfiction. Her most recent book is A Village Life: Poems. Louise GlŸck taught at Williams College for twenty years and served as the judge for the Yale Series of Younger Poets, 2003-2010. Currently Rosenkranz Writer-in-Residence at Yale University, she lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Van Jordan is the author of Quantum Lyrics; M-A-C-N-O-L-I-A, awarded the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award and listed as one the Best Books of 2005 by the London Times; and Rise, winner of the PEN/Oakland Josephine Miles Award. Jordan was also awarded a Whiting Writer’s Award in 2005 and a Pushcart Prize in 2006, its 30th Edition. The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and a United States Artists Williams Fellowship, Jordan is a professor in the department of English at the University of Michigan.

James Longenbach is the author of four books of poems, most recently The Iron Key; his poems have also appeared in many magazines, including New Republic, New Yorker, and Paris Review.  In addition, his reviews of contemporary poets appear frequently in Nation and New York Times Book Review; the most recent of his five books of literary criticism is The Art of the Poetic Line. He teaches regularly in the Warren Wilson MFA Program and at the University of Rochester, where he is the Joseph H. Gilmore Professor of English.

Tom Sleigh’s most recent book, Army Cats, was published this spring. Space Walk won the 2008 Kingsley Tufts Award.  His book of essays, Interview with a Ghost, was published in 2006. He has also published After One, Waking, The Chain, The Dreamhouse, Far Side of the Earth, Bula Matari/Smasher of Rocks, and a translation of Euripides’s Herakles. He has won the Shelley Prize from the Poetry Society of America, and grants from the Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Fund, the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts. He teaches in the MFA Program at Hunter College.

Arthur Sze has published nine books of poetry, including The Ginkgo Light, winner of the PEN Southwest Book Award; Quipu; The Redshifting Web: Poems 1970-1998; Archipelago, winner of an American Book Award; and The Silk Dragon: Translations from the Chinese. He is also the editor of Chinese Writers on Writing. Among his many awards are a Lannan Literary Award and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Fund, the Howard Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts. He was the first poet laureate of Santa Fe (2006-2008) and is a professor emeritus at the Institute of American Indian Arts.

Ellen Bryant Voigt has published seven volumes of poetry, including Kyrie (1995), a finalist for the National Book Crit_ics Circle Award, Shadow of Heaven (2002), and Messenger: New and Selected Poems (2007), a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and winner of The Poets’ Prize.  Her prose work includes The Flexible Lyric, a collection of essays on craft, and The Art of Syntax: Rhythm of Thought, Rhythm of Song.  A former Vermont Poet Laureate, she has been a Chancellor of the American Academy of Poets and an elected member of the Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Fellowship of Southern Writers.  Twice a finalist for the National Book Award, she has received National Endowment for the Arts and Guggenheim fellowships, the Academy of American Poets’ Fellowship, Best American and Pushcart prizes, and the O. B. Hardison, Jr.  Poetry Prize from the Folger Shakespeare Library.  She teaches in the Warren Wilson MFA Program and lives in Cabot, VT.

For more participants & information: http://www.middlebury.edu/blwc/faculty_guests_staff

34.)

“Great Poetry Links”
Onomatopoetic Words

First off: Ompa is the sound of a car going over a speedbump.

Onomatopoeia is derived from Greek words meaning “name making.” Onomatopoeia means the “name” given to a sound. It’s a word imitation of noise.  But it is hard to spell onomatopoeia and even harder to describe what it is, much less pronounce it. You always have to stop and explain it. So to make things easier, I shortened it to OMPA. Which is what onomatopoeia is anyway- a conversational speedbump. Need some examples? How about…

Doink: a small berry on a tennis racket
Chew: a train eating
Hum:  singing with your mouth closed

Now, there must be a way to use some of these in poetry, don’t you think?  I’ll leave that up to you!

35.)

“There is one thing more exasperating than a wife who can cook and won’t, and that’s a wife who can’t cook and will.

Poetry Quote by Robert Frost

36.) linebreak

Linebreak is an online journal with a bias for good poetry. Here is a poem from their web site this week:

Months after the Mt. Cashmere Wildfire, with Meteors

BY LUKE JOHNSON
– Wenatchee National Forest

Our bodies are lower than the nettles.
Our campsite is illegal and our chests have carved

soft outlines into mountain dust. We hear
the river, but haven’t yet found a way

down. Between breezes there are sounds
like wounded animals, moans and chirps

without translation. It is the forest
devouring itself: scorched timber’s last cracks. (….)

37.)
American Life in Poetry: Column 312
BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE, 2004-2006

Ellery Akers is a California poet who here brings all of us under a banner with one simple word on it.

The Word That Is a Prayer

One thing you know when you say it:
all over the earth people are saying it with you;
a child blurting it out as the seizures take her,
a woman reciting it on a cot in a hospital.
What if you take a cab through the Tenderloin:
at a street light, a man in a wool cap,
yarn unraveling across his face, knocks at the window (….)

38.)

Poets Laureate of the U.S.A.

A Net-annotated list of all the poets who have served the Library of Congress as Consultant (the old title) or Poet Laureate Consultant (the new title). Biographies & general reference sites are linked to the poets’ names — for the recent Laureates these are our own poet profiles with book-buying links at the bottom. Many of the other linked biographies are pages from the Academy of American Poets’ Find a Poet archive, a growing & invaluable resource. If there is no general information site about the poet, we have searched the Net for sample poems or other writings or recordings & listed those below the poet’s name.

Joseph Auslander 1937-41
Allen Tate 1943-44
Robert Penn Warren 1944-45
Louise Bogan 1945-46
Karl Shapiro 1946-47
Robert Lowell 1947-48
Leonie Adams 1948-49
Elizabeth Bishop 1949-50
Conrad Aiken 1950-52 (First to serve two terms)
William Carlos WilliamsAppointed to serve two terms in 1952 but did not serve — for more on this & other Laureate controversies see the history in Jacket magazine.
Randall Jarrell 1957-58
Robert Frost 1958-59
Richard Eberhart 1959-61
Louis Untermeyer 1961-63
Howard Nemerov 1963-64
Reed Whittemore 1964-65
Stephen Spender 1965-66
James Dickey 1966-68
William Jay Smith 1968-70
William Stafford 1970-71
Josephine Jacobsen 1971-73
Daniel Hoffman 1973-74
Stanley Kunitz 1974-76
Robert Hayden 1976-78
William Meredith 1978-80
Maxine Kumin 1981-82
Anthony Hecht 1982-84
Robert Fitzgerald 1984-85 Appointed and served in a health-limited capacity, but did not come to the Library of Congress
Reed Whittemore 1984-85 Interim Consultant in Poetry
Gwendolyn Brooks 1985-86
Robert Penn Warren 1986-87 First to be designated Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry
Richard Wilbur 1987-88
Howard Nemerov 1988-90
Mark Strand 1990-91
Joseph Brodsky 1991-92
Mona Van Duyn 1992-93
Rita Dove 1993-95
Robert Hass 1995-97
Robert Pinsky 1997-2000
Stanley Kunitz 2000-2001
Billy Collins 2001-2003
Louise Glück 2003-2004
Ted Kooser 2004-2006
Donald Hall 2006-2007
Charles Simic 2007-2008
Kay Ryan 2008-2010
M.S. Merwin 2010-Present

39.)

Historical List of Vermont Poets Laureate

July 26, 2007-Present: Ruth Stone, Goshen (b. June 8, 1915)
March 5, 2003 – July 25, 2007: Grace Paley, Thetford (b. December 11, 1922, d. August 22, 2007 of breast cancer)
1999-2002: Ellen Bryant Voigt, Cabot (b. May 9, 1943)
1994-1998: Louise Glück, Cambridge, MA (b. April 22, 1943)
1989-1993: Galway Kinnell, Sheffield (b. February 1, 1927)
July 22, 1961-1963: Robert Frost, Ripton (b. March 26, 1874, d. January 29, 1963 of pulmonary embolism)

Position History:
 According to a February 7, 2003 press release from the Vermont Arts Council, “Robert Frost was declared Poet Laureate in 1961 [upon the adoption of Joint House Resolution 54 by the General Assembly]. In 1988 Governor Kunin re-established the position. (Reference: Executive Order No 69, 1988) Galway Kinnell was the first State Poet named for a term of 4 years as a result of this order in 1989.” The Arts Council further notes that “at the direction of the Governor [it] conducts the selection process for the State Poet by convening an advisory/selection panel. The Vermont State Poet is a person whose primary residence is in Vermont; whose poetry manifests a high degree of excellence; who has produced a critically acclaimed body of work; and who has a long association with Vermont.”

40.)

Historical list of United States Poets Laureate from Vermont

1958-1959: Robert Frost, Ripton (b. March 26, 1874, d. January 29, 1963 of pulmonary embolism)
August, 2003-2004: Louise Glück, Cambridge, MA (b. April 22, 1943)

41.)

Historical List of New Hampshire Poets Laureate

March 2004 – Present: Charles E. Butts
January 2006 – March 2009: Patricia Fargnoli
March 2004 – December 2005: Cynthia Huntington
October, 1999 – March 2004: Marie Harris, Barrington
December 1995 – March 1999: Donald Hall, Wilmot
January 1995 – March 1999: Jane Kenyon, Wilmot
March 1989 – March 1994: Maxine Kumin, Warner
June, 1984 – January 1989: Donald Hall, Danbury
January 1979 – January 1984: Richard G. Eberhart, Hanover
August 1972 – December 1978: Eleanor Vinton, Concord
September 1968 – July 1972: Paul Scott Mowrer

42.)

Historical list of United States Poets Laureate from New Hampshire

2007-2008: Charles Simic, Strafford
2006-2007: Donald Hall, Wilmot
1981-1982: Maxine Kumin, Warner
1959-1961: Richard Eberhart
1958-1959: Robert Frost, Derry

43.) If you ever have a need to contact me, here’s how to go about doing so:

Ronald Lewis:
Phone: 802-247-5913
Cell: 802-779-5913
Home: 1211 Forest Dale Road, Brandon, VT 05733
Email: vtpoet@gmail.com

44.) VERMONT LITERARY JOURNALS

1) The Queen City Review

The QCR is also on FacebookBurlington College’s The Queen City Review is a yearly journal of art and literature and accepts the work of new and established writers and artists in the areas of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, memoir, photography, and fine art, as well as essays and criticism on all aspects of the aforementioned. They seek to publish high quality work that ranges 3) broadly in topic and genre.

The Queen City Review can be purchased by 2-year subscription or individually. The price of one issue is $8 plus shipping charges ($1) for a total of $9. Subscriptions can be purchased for $14 plus shipping charges ($2) and includes the Fall 2010 and upcoming 2011 issues. Copies can also be purchased in the Writing Center or at the front desk. They accept cash, check, and credit cards (Visa and Mastercard). You can mail your payment to them or by calling (802) 862-9616 ext. 234 to place your order over the phone. If mailing your payment, mail details to:

ATTN: Heidi Berkowitz Sadler
Faculty, Interdisciplinary Studies
Coordinator, The Writing Center
Editor, The Queen City Review
Burlington College
95 North Avenue
Burlington, VT 05401

If you have any further questions, you can contact Heidi at:
T: 802-862-9616
E: hsadler@burlington.edu

2) Bloodroot

Bloodroot is a nonprofit literary magazine dedicated to publishing diverse voices through the adventure of poetry, short fiction, and creative nonfiction. Their aim is to provide a platform for the free-spirited emerging and established writer.

The price of a single issue is $8.

Editor, “Do” Roberts
Bloodroot Literary Magazine
PO Box 322
Thetford Center, VT 05075
(802) 785-4916
email: bloodroot@wildblue.net

3) New England Review

A publication of Middlebury College, a high quality literary magazine that continues to uphold its reputation for publishing extraordinary, enduring work. NER has been publishing now for over 30 years.

Cost: $10 for a single current issue
$30 for a single year (4 issues)
$50 for two years (8 issues)

New England Review
Attn: Orders
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753

Email: NEReview@middlebury.edu
(800) 450-9571

4) Willard & Maple

A Literary and Fine Art Magazine of Champlain College, Burlington.

Willard & Maple
163 South Willard Street
Freeman 302, Box 34
Burlington, VT 05401

email: willardandmaple@champlain.edu

5) Vermont Literary Review

A Literary and Fine Art Magazine of Castleton State College, Castleton.

The first issue of Vermont Literary Review was published in 1994. The review is published once a year. Work featured in the review includes poetry, fiction, drama, and personal essays from and about New England.

From its inception until 2006, students and professors reviewed the work submitted and selected work to be published. They used to jointly edit and design the review as well. After a brief lapse, the Vermont Literary Review has resumed publication in 2008 as a journal edited and designed solely by English Department faculty. The Literary Club, which used to help create this journal, is now putting out a publication of student work. (….)

6) Green Mountains Review


A Literary and Fine Art Magazine of Johnson State College, Johnson; in publication since 1987. One of two literary journals published by the college, the other being The Gihon River Review (below).

The Green Mountains Review is an international journal publishing poems, stories, and creative nonfiction by both well-known authors and promising newcomers. The magazine also features interviews, literary criticism, and book reviews. Neil Shepard is the general editor and poetry editor of the Green Mountains Review. The fiction editor is Leslie Daniels.

The editors are open to a wide range of styles and subject matter. If you would like to acquaint yourself with some of the work that we have accepted in the past, then we encourage you to order some of our back issues (….)

7) The Gihon River Review

“The name of the second river is Gihon. No sooner has it come out of Paradise than it vanishes beneath the depths of the sea . . .” –Moses Bar Cepha

The Gihon River Review, published biannually, was founded in the fall of 2001 as a production of the BFA program at Johnson State College. Issues are $5 each. Submissions in poetry, fiction, and nonfiction are read from September to May. Poetry submissions may not exceed five poems; fiction and nonfiction may not exceed twenty-five pages. Send all correspondence to The Gihon River Review, Johnson State College, Johnson, Vermont 05656. Please enclose a SASE. For further info by email, grr@jsc.vsc.edu.

8) Burlington Poetry Journal

The Burlington Poetry Journal is a new nonprofit publication interested in creating a means for provoking opinions, ideas, and thoughtful responses for poets in the Greater Burlington area. The Burlington Poetry Journal is an independent publication that is dedicated to the concept that art should be free and accessible to everyone. In a world with so many voices we believe in a community based, eclectic approach to the publication of poetry. Therefore, the BPJ will always welcome any form or style within its pages.

While there are numerous outlets for writers to gather and share privately in Vermont, there is no publication that brings together poetry of all styles and writers of all ages for the enjoyment of the general public. It is our hope that this journal will inspire writers to share their work with others who may be unaware of their talent, and for those who have never considered themselves writers to try their hand at poetry. We invite you to submit your work and share with others your thoughts and abilities with the Burlington community. The work you share will produce a dialogue as writers become aware of each other and begin to expose themselves and others to new poetry. The eclectic nature of the Burlington Poetry Journal will serve to stimulate its readers and authors. They are currently working towards achieving a non-profit 501(c)3 status.

9) Tarpaulin Sky

Founded in 2002 as an online literary journal, Tarpaulin Sky took the form of 12.5 internet issues (see the archive) before its first paper edition in November 2007, and the magazine continues to publish new work both online and in print. In addition to these issues, Tarpaulin Sky publishes work by individual authors in its “chronic content” section, as well as online-only book reviews

Tarpaulin Sky focuses on cross-genre / trans-genre / hybrid forms as well as innovative poetry and prose. The journal is not allied with any one style or school or network of writers; rather, we try to avoid some of the defects associated with dipping too often into the same literary gene pool, and the diversity of our contributors is evidence of our eclectic interests (….)

10) The Mountain Review

Colchester High School’s English Department has been publishing an interesting literary magazine: The Mountain Review. The Mountain Review is sponsored by the Vermont Council of Teachers of English Language Arts (VCTELA). Generally, the mission is to publish work from Vermont students, K-12. The Mountain Review has published poems, essays, short stories, excerpts from larger works, and art work. Wayland Cole and Katie Lenox have been the editors for several years; both teach at Colchester. Before them, Shelia Mable, a South Burlington teacher, was the editor for many years.

2009’s Mountain Review is over 100 pages long!

Students at all Vermont schools can enter the competition to be published in the Mountain Review. If you have questions, feel free to call them at (802) 264-5700 or email at colew@csdvt.org or lenoxk@csdvt.org. Send orders for copies of The Mountain Review to Katie Lenox at: Colchester High School, PO Box 900, Colchester, VT 05446. Send $5 per book; $2 postage to ship 1-3 books. Checks payable to the VCTELA.

11) The Salon: A Journal of Poetry & Fiction

The Honeybee Press is a brand-new writer’s cooperative based in Burlington, Vermont. The first book from the press is its bi-annual literary magazine, The Salon: A Journal of Poetry & Fiction. The goal of the press is to produce high-quality local literature and make it more affordable and visible to the public. To submit to The Salon, see the guidelines listed on its web address.

  • Click on link for submission guidelines.

12) Hunger Mountain

Hunger Mountain is both a print and online journal of the arts. We publish fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, visual art, young adult and children’s writing, writing for stage and screen, interviews, reviews, and craft essays. Our print issue comes out annually in the fall, and our online content changes on a regular basis. (….)

Hunger Mountain Subscriptions

Vermont College of Fine Arts
36 College Street
Montpelier, VT 05602

Subscription Prices
One Year $12.00
Two Year $22.00
Four Year $40.00 (Save $8!)
Back issues $8.00

13) The Onion River Review

The Onion River Review is a literary journal whose annual edition features poetry, prose, and visual arts. The Onion River Review is edited by the students of Saint Michael’s College in Vermont, and is committed to publishing work from students, faculty, staff, alumni, and the greater community.

The Onion River ReviewWilliam Marquess, Advisor
One Winooski Park #171
Colchester, VT 05439

14) Route Seven – The St. Albans Literary Guild Magazine

The first issue of the Saint Albans Literary Guild’s magazine, Route Seven: A Vermont Literary Journal, is a 56-page publication featuring new and established writers and artists with an emphasis on Northwestern Vermont writers. Strong literary and non-fiction voices from other regions are also featured and are encouraged to submit to future issues.

ST. ALBANS: The Saint Albans Literary Guild is proud to announce the release of the premiere issue of Route 7, a new Vermont literary journal, on Sat., Feb. 20, at the STAART Gallery in St. Albans. The event will feature readings from contributing authors, as well as hors d’oeuvres and beverages.
Route 7 is a 56-page magazine featuring fiction, non-fiction, humor, poetry, and artwork. The first issue includes a wide range of moods, from the introspective and idyllic to the offbeat and humorous. The more than 20 contributors included hail from Franklin County, and across Vermont and New Hampshire. The magazine aims to highlight creative voices from across the region. (….)

15) Vantage Point

Vantage Point is the arts and literary journal at the University of Vermont. VP is a student-run journal, supported by generous funding from the Student Government Association at UVM, which allows them to circulate the journal to students and the general public for free. They also receive funding from the Mary Brigham Buckham Fund, through UVM’s English Department.

Vantage Point was established in 2002 by a group of students in the Honors College who felt that UVM needed a literary journal. In the past, they have published strictly student work, however this past semester they opened up the submission pool to faculty and to the general public. They are continuing to go that route this semester as well.

16) est

est is a publication of literary and visual art.

It serves as an outlet for creative people to share their work freely with others.

With technology affirming its ever-present role in media and communication, it can be difficult to find an alternative that is as accessible and timely. Contrary to the endless supply of self proclaimed material from bloggers and youtubers, est works to sustain the precious art form of a handmade publication. All issues are of a limited edition and offer a unique perspective on the fears, humor and sensitivities of our world. Peer revision and interactive projects at the release events also help introduce and network contributors with each other. Past issues of est feature poetry, short fiction, drawing, photography, comics, DIY instructions and interactive projects. Each edition of 100 zines are hand numbered and bound by a pamphlet stitch.

Hard copies are available at select retailers as well as online via mail order. 
Subscriptions are also available.

est is available for viewing and purchase at these locations:

Speaking Volumes – Burlington, VT
Boutilier’s – Burlington, VT
Battery Street Jeans – Burlington, VT
Earth Prime Comics – Burlington, VT
Village Wine & Coffee – Shelburne, VT
Brown Dog Books – Hinesburg, VT

Direct correspondence to Heather Bischoff, Solicitor/Editor, at estpress@gmail.com

45.)

VERMONT LITERARY GROUPS’ ANTHOLOGIES

1) Vermont Voices, An Anthology

Published by the League of Vermont Writers periodically. They have just published their 3rd anthology.

  • Vermont Voices I (published in 1991)
  • Vermont Voices II (published in 1995)
  • Vermont Voices III (published in 1999)

2) *See Below

Published by the Otter Creek Poets periodically. They have just published their 3rd volume.

  • By the Waterfall (published in 1999)
  • Maps and Voyages (published in 2004)
  • Line By Line (published in 2006)

No web site to date. All editions and issues out of print and no longer available.

3) League of Vermont Writers

Published by the Mad River Poets periodically. They have just published their 3rd volume.

  • Pebbles from the Stream (published in 2002)
  • Maps and Voyages (published in 2004)
  • Line By Line (published in 2006)

4) The Mountain Troubadour

  • Published by the Poetry Society of Vermont annually.

46.) VERMONT POETRY BLOGS

1) PoemShape

Patrick Gillespie maintains a bright, intelligent blog. There is a decided bias in favoring poetry that is written in meter, that uses form, or that plays with language in ways that separate poetry from prose – rhetoric, imagery, simile, metaphor, conceit, rhyme, meter — Traditional Poetry.

PoemShape is now the home of the Vermont Poetry Newsletter & Poetry Event Calendar.

One can subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new postings by email.

47.)

STATE POETRY SOCIETY

The Poetry Society of Vermont, founded in 1947, is an association of poets and supporters who join in promoting an interest in poetry through meetings, workshops, readings, contests, and contributions to the society’s chapbook. Anyone may join the society including high school and college students and non-residents of Vermont. We welcome both writers and appreciative readers.Membership in PSOV

Benefits:
  • 2 luncheon/ workshops a year where a professional poet critiques your poems
  • one hands- on writing workshop and reading under the direction of a professional poet
  • the opportunity to enter contests judged by professional poets and to win awards
  • fellowship with appreciative readers and writers of poetry
  • opportunity for publication in the PSOV chapbook, The Mountain Troubadour
How to join:
mail dues of $20.00 to Membership Chairman, P.O. Box 1215, Waitsfield, VT 05673
include your name, mailing address, telephone, and e-mail address for Membership List
memberships are renewed by January 1 of each year
The PSOV has 2 current books available for sale:
1) The Mountain Troubadour – 2010 – Curl up with interesting, award-winning poetry from a wonderful group of poets. This book is only $8 (+$1 to mail). To get yourself a copy, call or write to Betty Gaechter, 134 Hitzel Terrace, Rutland, VT 05701, 773-8679. This little booklet may be just the thing to get you involved with the PSOV for a lifetime of friendships.
2) Brighten the Barn – 60th Anniversary Anthology – 1947-2007 – An Anthology of Poems by Members of the Poetry Society of Vermont. 99 pages of quality poetry; that’s a lot of beautiful poetry for only $12. If you get it through me (Ron Lewis), it’s only $12. If you want it shipped to you, the PSOV wants an extra amount to cover tax and shipping ($0.72 + $3.00). This book retails for $15, but a reduced price is now in play to unload the few remaining copies.

48.) YEAR-ROUND POETRY WORKSHOPS IN VERMONT


BELLOWS FALLS

1) Great River Arts Institute – See details elsewhere in this newsletter

2) Poetry Workshop at Village Square Booksellers with Jim Fowler (no relation to owner Pat). The goal of this course is to introduce more people to the art of writing poetry and will include a discussion of modern poetry in various forms and styles. Each week, the course will provide time to share and discuss participant’s poetry. Poetry Workshops on Monday mornings (9:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m.) – Jim Fowler’s sessions continue, with periodic break for a few weeks between sessions. Students should bring a poem and copies to the first class. The course will be limited to 5 to 8 students to allow adequate time to go through everyone’s poetry contributions and will meet in the café at Village Square Booksellers. James Fowler, of Charlestown, New Hampshire, has a Masters Degree in Environmental Science with a major in Nature Writing. He was the editor of Heartbeat of New England, a poetry anthology. Fowler has been widely published since 1998 in such journals as Connecticut Review, Quarterly of Light Verse, and Larcom Review. Fowler is a founding member of the River Voices Writer’s Circle, and a regular reader at Village Square Booksellers-River Voices Poetry Readings. The fee for this 6-week Workshop is $100, payable to Mr. Fowler at the first class. Pre-registration for the Poetry Workshop is suggested and may be made by calling Village Square Booksellers at 802-463-9404 or by email at vsbooks@sover.net or jfowler177@comcast.net.

3) InkBlot Complex Poetry Workshop runs through the Vermont Independent Media’s Media Mentoring Project and is held at the Rockingham Public Library at 65 Westminster Street in Bellows Falls. No previous writing or journalism experience or even class attendance is required. Participants are invited to bring a project or share successful techniques. The workshop aims to lift poetry from the page and reveal how it is a living force in daily life. Originally taught at the University of Illinois at Chicago to great acclaim, its interactive nature and inclusion of multiple art forms leaves dry, academic notions of poetry behind. It functions through three tenets: 1) Presentation of the art form as a living element of our daily world, 2) individualized, personal enrichment and free range of expression for each student, and 3) artistic cultivation through unexpected means. Taught by seasoned arts journalist, cultural critic and poet Clara Rose Thornton, this free event explores the poetry we encounter all around us – in songs we hear, the ways we express ourselves, even the advertisements we see. In the final session students then create their own works with an increased sense of connection to the way words construct meaning. All materials are provided. Instructor Clara Rose Thornton is an internationally published film, wine and visual arts critic, music journalist, poet and former book and magazine editor. Her writings on culture and the arts have appeared nationally in Stop Smiling: The Magazine for High-Minded Lowlifes, Honest Tune: The American Journal of Jam and Time Out Chicago. Currently residing in an artists’ colony in Windham County, she acts as the biweekly arts columnist for the Rutland Herald, staff writer for Southern Vermont Arts & Living and a regular contributor to The Commons. A portfolio, bio and roster of writing and editing services can be found at www.clararosethornton.com. For more information about the Media Mentoring Project, visit www.commonsnews.org or call 246-6397. You can also write to Vermont Independent Media at P.O. Box 1212, Brattleboro, VT 05302.

For more on the InkBlot Complex Poetry Workshop, see description under Other Poetry Workshops in Vermont (Anywhere, VT).

BERLIN

The Wayside Poets, who share their poetry publicly from time to time, have been meeting irregularly for the past 25 years. They used to be called The Academy Street Poets. Membership is by invitation only. They meet now at the Wayside Restaurant & Bakery in Berlin. Members include Diane Swan, Sherry Olson, Carol Henrikson and Sarah Hooker. You can contact them through Sherry Olson at: solsonvt@aol.com or 454-8026.

BURLINGTON

The Cherry Lane Poets are a small group (7-8) of poets that meet on the first Thursday of every month. The membership has been kept to a minimum so that poets will have all the time they need during critiques. Each poet has been or is a member of another poetry critiquing group, so the information passed to each other is more professional than that of most poetry groups. The primary goal of this group is to polish their work, get it submitted, and have it published. Each member brings a new poem with them, with enough copies to pass around, and reads it aloud to the group; it gets critiqued by each member during the following month, and those critiques are presented at the next meeting. Regina Brault is the contact person, (802) 860-1018; membership is by invitation only.

The Burlington Poets Society, a group of “stanza scribblers” that express their love of verse, made up of UVM students and professors, have recently organized, meeting at the Fleming Museum at UVM in Burlington for their periodic “The Painted Word” series of poetry readings.

GUILFORD

The Johnson Writer’s Group, newly formed on January 26, 2011, meets weekly on Wednesday evenings from 7:00 to 9:00, at the Johnson Public Library on Railroad Street, in the front room. This is a free drop-in prompt writing group modeled after the Burlington Writing Group that’s been going strong for many years now. The writers themselves decide on a prompt and write for 20 minutes, followed by a go-around reading. They usually get in two writes depending on the group’s size. All genres and experience levels are welcomed and there really are no rules other than not interrupting folks while they are writing. They don’t really do much critiquing though some spontaneous reactions do occur! This group believes that it’s just good practice to show up and write for 40 minutes and share the writing if so inclined… Feel free to join this group on a perpetual basis or whenever you’re in town. Contact is Cynthia Hennard at (802) 363-5541 or (802) 730-8125.

JOHNSON

The Guilford Poets Guild, formed in 1998, meets twice a month to critique and support each other’s work. Their series of sponsored readings by well-known poets which began at the Dudley Farm, continues now at the Women and Family Life Center.

MIDDLEBURY

1.) The Otter Creek Poets offer a poetry workshop every Thursday afternoon, from 1:00 to 3:00 in the basement meeting room of the Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main Street, Middlebury. This workshop, the largest and oldest of its kind in the state, has been meeting weekly for 13 years. Poets of all ages and styles come for peer feedback, encouragement, and optional weekly assignments to get the poetry flowing. Bring a poem or two to share (plus 20 copies). The workshops are led by David Weinstock. There is considerable parking available behind the library, or further down the hill below that parking lot. For more information, call David at 388-6939 or Ron Lewis at 247-5913.

2) The Spring Street Poets. This group is by invite only and consists of six members, Jennifer Bates, Janet Fancher, Karin Gottshall, Ray Hudson, Mary Pratt and David Weinstock.

MONTPELIER: Vermont College of Fine Arts

Established in 1981, the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing Program was one of the first low-residency programs in the country. The Atlantic named it one of the top five low-residency programs nationwide. At each MFA in Writing residency, a renowned poetry or prose writer joins the program for a substantial portion of the residency. The author gives a reading and/or talk, meets with numerous students individually, and is available in many informal ways throughout the residency to interact with students. The College publishes Hunger Mountain: the VCFA Journal of the Arts and writers may choose to attend a summer residency in Slovenia, in lieu of Vermont.

PANTON

This town is the home of Leonard Gibbs and his Dead Creek Poets Society. Leonard Gibbs is a member of the Otter Creek Poets and Poetry Society of Vermont, is the Magister Ludi of The Dead Creek Poets’ Society. Leonard invites visitors to his web site, Quibbles.com, and subsequent comments for discussion; send him some of your poetry for free critiques! He’s really very good. Leonard’s email address is: ML_Len@Quibbles.org. Interesting responses to items Leonard has posed on his site may end up on the site itself.

Leonard also publishes the Poet’s Corner, a regular monthly column in the Addison Independent. The newspaper has recently informed Len that they would like to have more poetry published in their newspaper, so Len is asking poets from anywhere in Vermont to send him material for him to review for future articles in Poet’s Corner.

NORWICH

This group meets on the first Sunday of every month at the Norwich Library, 6:30 p.m.

SAINT ALBANS

The Saint Albans Literary Guild organizes author readings, classes on writing and literature, and other book related events. The Guild is sponsoring a new literary magazine featuring local writers. Finally, it promotes Vermont authors, book groups, writing groups, and literary events held in Franklin County and northwestern Vermont. Contact us for more information or join the Guild to become involved with literary endeavors in your area.

The first issue of the Saint Albans Literary Guild’s magazine, Route Seven: A Vermont Literary Journal, is a 56-page publication featuring new and established writers and artists with an emphasis on Northwestern Vermont writers. Strong literary and non-fiction voices from other regions are also featured and are encouraged to submit to future issues.

Contact them through their web site or through Jay Fleury, Guild President.

SPRINGFIELD

A Writer’s Group has started to meet at the Springfield Town Library on the fourth Monday of each month, from 7 to 8 pm. For more information, call 885-3108.

STOWE

There is another poetry workshop happening in Stowe, but unfortunately I know nothing much about this group. If you do, contact me!

WAITSFIELD

The Mad River Poets consists of a handful of poets from the Route 100 corridor. More on this group in the future.


49.)

OTHER POETRY WORKSHOPS IN VERMONT

BURLINGTON

Scribes in the making put pen to paper as part of an open verse-writing session at the Fletcher Free Library, 235 College Street. Contact information: 862-1094.

ANYWHERE, VERMONT

Revived for the 2009 academic year is the InkBlot Complex Poetry Workshop, designed for upper-elementary and high-school-age students, grades 7-12. The curriculum functions through three tenets:

  • Innovative presentation of the art form as a living element of our daily world
  • Individualized, personal enrichment and free range of expression for each student
  • Artistic cultivation through unexpected means

The workshop debuted at the University of Illinois at Chicago, during a three-week summer program, entitled Project C.H.A.N.C.E., for underprivileged sophomore and senior students from area high schools. It was a fantastic success, and the program director requested its return. With this encouragement, I decided to expand and adapt the workshop for various age levels, as an educational/arts supplement for after-school programs and enrichment programs and an arts elective for more traditional academic settings. The response has been wonderful. (…) Click on Typewriter for more…

WHITE RIVER JUNCTION

The Writer’s Center
58 Main Street, White River Junction, Vermont

Instructor: April Ossmann (author of Anxious Music, Four Way Books, 2007, writing, editing and publishing consultant, and former Executive Director of Alice James Books)

Info: (802)333-9597 or aprilossmann@hotmail.com and http://www.aprilossmann.com.

50.)

YEAR-ROUND POETRY WRITING CENTERS IN VERMONT

BURLINGTON

The Burlington Writer’s Group (BWG) meets on Tuesday evenings from 7-9 PM and has a new home at the Unitarian Church in the church’s little white house off of Clark St., 2nd floor. They’d like to let people know and also invite anyone interested to join them whenever folks are in town or as often as they’d like.

The Burlington Writer’s Group is a free drop-in group. They decide on a prompt and write for 20 minutes, followed by a go-around reading. They can usually get in two writes depending on group size. All genres and experience levels are welcome and there really are no rules other than demonstrating courtesy while people are writing (don’t interrupt). They don’t do much critiquing though some spontaneous reactions occur. Mainly it’s good practice to just show up and write for 40 minutes and share the writing, if so inclined…

BURLINGTON

Women Writing for (a) Change supports the authentic experience of women who honor themselves through creative writing. Our community supports reflection as we move into our questions and awaken to change. Participants enhance expressive skills, strengthen their voices, deepen themselves as women as writers for positive change in all spheres of life. Creative writing in all genres is our shared vehicle. Women Writing for (a) Change is for women who, 1) dream of writing for self-discovery, for personal or social healing, 2) hunger for creative process in their lives, 3) yearn to explore their feminine voice, 4) crave reflective, space, and 5) are in transition. For more information, go to their web site at www.leagueofvermontwriters.org or contact Sarah Bartlett at either 899-3772 or sarah@womenwritingvt.com.

JOHNSON

Vermont Studio Center

Founded by artists in 1984, the Vermont Studio Center is the largest international artists’ and writers’ Residency Program in the United States, hosting 50 visual artists and writers each month from across the country and around the world.

The Vermont Studio Center offers four-to-twelve-week studio residencies year-round to 600 painters, sculptors, printmakers, photographers, and writers (50 residents per month). VSC’s 30-building campus is set on the banks of the Gihon River in rural Johnson, Vermont, a town of 3,000 located in the heart of the northern Green Mountains. Each Studio Center residency features undistracted working time, the companionship of fifty artists and writers from across the country and around the world, and access to a roster of prominent Visiting Artists and Writers. All residencies include comfortable housing, private studio space, and excellent food. Two Visiting Writers per month are in residence for one week each to offer readings, a craft talk, and optional conferences with each of the 10-14 writers in residence each month.

MONTPELIER

Vermont College of Fine Arts

Established in 1981, the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing Program was one of the first low-residency programs in the country. The Atlantic named it one of the top five low-residency programs nationwide. At each MFA in Writing residency, a renowned poetry or prose writer joins the program for a substantial portion of the residency. The author gives a reading and/or talk, meets with numerous students individually, and is available in many informal ways throughout the residency to interact with students. The College publishes Hunger Mountain: the VCFA Journal of the Arts and writers may choose to attend a summer residency in Slovenia, in lieu of Vermont.

SPRINGFIELD

A Writer’s Group has started to meet at the Springfield Town Library on the fourth Monday of each month, from 7 to 8 pm. For more information, call 885-3108.

WHITE RIVER JUNCTION

The Writer’s Center is for serious writers and nervous beginners. It’s for procrastinators who could benefit from regular deadlines – and for the prolific who could benefit from quality feedback. It’s for anyone with a manuscript hidden in a drawer, or a life story or poem waiting to be written. It’s for people who don’t know where to start or how to end. And for writers who are doing just fine on their own, but would like the company of other writers. The Writer’s Center is for anyone who is writing or wants to write. One of the Center’s consultants is April Ossman. Founded by Joni B. Cole and Sarah Stewart Taylor, the Writer’s Center offers instruction and inspiration through a selection of workshops, discussions, and community. We would love to see you – and your writing – at The Writer’s Center!

  • Prose‭! ‬Poetry‭! ‬Journaling‭! ‬Pitching‭! (‬I know‭! ‬I know‭! ‬F.‭ ‬Scott Fitzgerald said that using exclamation points is like laughing at your own joke‭… ‬but what’s wrong with that‭?!!!)

Below is a list of summer writing workshops at The Writer’s Center of White River Junction.‭ ‬Please pre-register‭ (‬asap‭) ‬with the instructor to reserve your space at the writing table.‭ (‬These classes are also listed at The Writer’s Center website at‭ ‬www.thewriterscenterwrj.com

  • The Writer’s Center” has a new Facebook Page that we’re now using to spread the word about workshops, offer writing tips, share publishing news, etc. If you haven’t already, be a part of the page by following the link below and clicking “like”. Write on!
Write‭! ‬A Summer Writing Workshop for Teens‭

·
Two sessions.‭ ‬Session One is for writers aged‭ ‬12‭ ‬-‭ ‬14‭ ‬and is offered August‭ ‬11‭ ‬and‭ ‬12‭ ‬from‭ ‬2-5‭ ‬each day.‭ ‬Session Two is for writers aged‭ ‬15-17‭ ‬is offered August‭ ‬15‭ ‬and‭ ‬16‭ ‬from‭ ‬2-5‭ ‬each day.‭
·
Instructor:‭ ‬Sarah Stewart Taylor‭
 $75‎

·
This fiction and non-fiction workshop is for younger writers who love to write or think they’d love to write.‭ ‬We’ll talk about constructing narratives,‭ ‬creating characters,‭ ‬and making your prose sing.‭ ‬Participants will engage in fun and inspiring writing prompts and exercises and share their work with the group.‭ ‬For more information or to register,‭ ‬email writerscenterwrj@aol.com or call‭ ‬(802‭) ‬295-2006. Sarah is a fiction writer,‭ ‬journalist,‭ ‬and teacher.‭ ‬She is the author of four mystery novels,‭ ‬as well as This Broad Ocean,‭ ‬a graphic novel about Amelia Earhart for middle-grade readers.‭ ‬She is a co-founder of The Writer’s Center of White River Junction and teaches at The Center for Cartoon Studies and the New England Young Writer’s Conference.‭ ‬She lives in Hartland,‭ ‬VT with her family.‭
‬
·
Writing Retreat:‭ ‬How To Write More,‭ ‬Write Better,‭ ‬and Be Happier‭

·
August‭ ‬21‭ ‬-23‭ ‬or September‭ ‬18‭ ‬-20,‭ ‬2011‭

·
Highland Lake Inn,‭ ‬Andover,‭ ‬New Hampshire‭
·
Workshop fee includes two nights lodging and meals ‭
‬$530‭ (‬per person/double occupancy‭); ‬$705‭ (‬single occupancy‭)
For writers and aspiring writers of fiction and creative nonfiction.‭ ‬This unique retreat,‭ ‬set in one of the Northeast’s loveliest inns,‭ ‬mixes private time to write with workshops that offer insights into craft,‭ ‬quality feedback,‭ ‬and support.‭ ‬The retreat is led by author and workshop instructor Joni Cole.‭ ‬For more info about her extensive teaching experience and books,‭ ‬visit jonibcole.com.‭ ‬Participation in this retreat is purposely small‭ (‬maximum of six writers‭) ‬to assure personal attention and space.‭ ‬To register or learn more:‭ ‬email jonibethcole@gmail.com or‭ ‬802‭ ‬295-5526.

51.)

OTHER WRITING GROUPS IN VERMONT

The League of Vermont Writers.

The League is open to all who make writing a part of their lives. We offer encouragement, motivation, and networking opportunities to writers with a broad range of writing experience.
You do not need to be published to join. Visit their Membership Page for more information about benefits and fees.
Founded in 1929, LVW’s mission is to:

  • Help writers develop their skills
  • Promote responsible and ethical writing and writing practices
  • Increase communication between professional writers and publishers
  • Promote an enduring appreciation for the power of the word

The LVW publishes Vermont Voices, An Anthology, at irregular times. They have published 3 separate volumes to date.

52.)

POETRY EVENT CALENDAR

Below please find the most current list of poetry happenings in Vermont for the near future.  Please be aware that these events can be found on Poetz.com, but there is usually additional information that is typed here that would be cumbersome to place on Poetz.com.  Please note all events are Vermont-based unless they are of extreme importance or happen to lie just outside our borders.  If you would like to save on paper and ink, please just highlight what you need, or perhaps only events for the coming month, and print that information.  All events are advertised as free unless indicated otherwise.

Mon, July 25: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m..  Marie Howe.  Marie Howe is the author of three volumes of poetry, The Kingdom of Ordinary Time (2008); The Good Thief (1998); and What the Living Do (1997), and is the co-editor of a book of essays, In the Company of My Solitude: American Writing from the AIDS Pandemic (1994). Stanley Kunitz selected Howe for a Lavan Younger Poets Prize from the American Academy of Poets. She has, in addition, been a fellow at the Bunting Institute at Radcliffe College and a recipient of NEA and Guggenheim fellowships. Her poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Poetry, Agni, Ploughsahres, Harvard Review, and The Partisan Review, among others. Currently, Howe teaches creative writing at Sarah Lawrence College, Columbia, and New York University.

Tue, Jul 26: Parima Acoustic Lounge, 185 Pearl Street, Burlington, 7:30 p.m..Parima Presents: Community Supported Poetry with Trevien Stanger and Darshana Bolt.  Info, 864-7917.

Trevien Stanger is breathing life into Burlington. Wild. Life. One of the founding members of the natal Parima Poets Publishing Collective, Trevien is a pure example of the independent thought and self-motivated spirit that identify this state. He is an organizer, a rabble-rouser, a person who seems to have the simple-yet-elusive understanding of who he is, what he is doing, and why. These traits have paid dividends, in both the content of his creative work and the means in which he transmits it to us. His new chapbook of poems, entitled “Wild. Life.” is 45 pages of prose, percussion and verse. He carries us with him in his knapsack as he travels from VT Route-100 to the Pacific Northwest to the Australian jungle and back here to the Radio Bean in Burlington, Vermont. He pays attention to spaces, and his place in them. He gets his fingers on the pulse. The pulse in Burlington has started throbbing. Beginning with some small readings in the Parima Thai Restaurant’s Acoustic Lounge (a place with which Trevien has a mutualistic symbiosis), participation in performance poetry has swelled into regular one-and-a-half to two-hour sessions every Monday night with sporadic satellite readings at the On the Rise Bakery in Richmond. Trevien’s momentum, added to that of the other poets his gravity attracts, has launched an independent publishing house for local poets whose work may not fit into the mold larger corporate publishing houses are looking for: “Poetry can’t be constricted by what they are going to publish.” He told me that if he were a musician, he would “play as crazy a thing as I could think of, bizarre jazz measures.” That description feels right at home with his work, and his lifestyle. Because Trevien isn’t just a poet, he is a man living poetically. And writing it down, whispering it, shouting it, rebounding it off of some sweet jazz guitar, and our ear-drums, and our mind-drums. Trevien is an explorer, searching for the way a person can be physically, imaginatively, intellectually, morally, and spiritually alive. Wild. Life.  Bio of Trevien written by John Milton Oliver.  Trevein is also the WebMaster of the Vermont Poetry web site (http://www.vermontpoetry.org/).

Darshana Bolt is an artist, clothing designer for Hot Cooter Hi-End Fashions, art critic for Art Map Burlington, Ramble coordinator, poet, story-writer, lead singer in a punk/drag band called Moustache Ride, model/narcissist, rainbow/spandex/moonboot-enthusiast, Teflon-scraper, anarchist, art teacher, messmaker, and aspiring unicorn. She has a website for brand new things (darshanabolt.wordpress.com) and a website full of older things (darshanabolt.weebly.com).

Wed, Jul 27: Misty Valley Books, Main Street On The Green, Chester, 7:00 p.m.. Poet Michael Palma returns with a new poetry series: “In a World I Never Made”- the poetry of Thomas Hardy and A. E. Housman.  This is the last evening of a 4-Wednesday series.  The title of this series is a line from a poem by A.E. Housman who, with the publication of A Shropshire Lad in 1896, Housman instantly took his place among the leading poets of his time. Classics such as “To an Athlete Dying Young” and “When I Was One-and-Twenty” have remained perpetual favorites for their rueful longings, mordant wit, and knack for memorable phrase-making.  After a successful career as a novelist that produced Tess of the D’Ubervilles, and The Mayor of Casterbridge, Thomas Hardy stopped writing fiction in his late 50’s and turned to his first love, poetry. He wrote over 900 poems, including a poignant series of verses provoked by grief and guilt after his wife’s death in 1912. Reservations encouraged. FREE ~ At the bookstore.

Wed, Jul 27: St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 1171 Main Street, St. Johnsbury, 7:30 p.m.  Rachel Hadas. Rachel Hadas is the author of numerous books of poetry, essays, and translations, most recently The River of Forgetfulness (Wordtech Communications, 2006); Laws (2004); Indelible (2001); Halfway Down the Hall: New & Selected Poems (1998), which was a finalist for the 1999 Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize; The Empty Bed (1995); The Double Legacy (1995); Mirrors of Astonishment (1992); and Living in Time (1990).

Hadas studied classics at Harvard University, poetry at Johns Hopkins, and comparative literature at Princeton University. She spent four years in Greece between college and graduate school, an experience that surfaces variously in much of her work.

Since 1981 she has taught in the English Department of the Newark, New Jersey campus of Rutgers University, and has taught occasional courses in literature and writing at both Columbia and Princeton. She has also served as faculty of the Sewanee Writers’Conference.

About Hadas’s work, the poet Grace Schulman has written, “The poems are urgent, contemplative, and finely wrought. In them, antiquity illuminates the present as Rachel Hadas finds in ordinary human acts ‘what never was and what is eternal.'”

Among her honors are a Guggenheim Fellowship, an Ingram Merrill Foundation grant, and an award in literature from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters.

She lives in New York City.

Info, 748-8291, inform@stjathenaeum.org, http://www.stjathenaeum.org/.

Fri-Sun, Jul 29-31: Woodstock, at various locations (see below).  Bookstock. Bookstock, now in its third year, celebrates the written and spoken word for all ages and in all genres, free and open to the public.   Fiction, non-fiction and poetry authors of national and regional renown are included; in all, over 30 authors, actors, musicians and artists.   Workshops will be held on a variety of topics, as well as a show of book art.  Book sales, vendor exhibits (a large exhibitor tent for publishers and other vendors) and music will take place on the fabled town Green, as well as food concessions.  Also, there will be special offers from Woodstock’s retail merchants.

There will be 4 venues at Bookstock:

1) The Town Hall for the 2 plenary sessions
2) The Norman Williams Library Mezzanine and Library Reading Room for adult readings, its      History Room for Workshops
3) The Woodstock History Center for children’s and adult authors, its Barn Gallery for workshops
4) The Courthouse for the Poetry readings (*All poetry readings to happen here, from noon to 4 or 5) (a finalized schedule of readings will be available in your next VPN)

**All poetry readings will be held at the Courthouse on Saturday, July 30th, from noon to 4:00 (or 5:00).  Readers will be David Budbill, Cleopatra Mathis, Wesley McNair, and Sharon Olds. Info, contact Peter Rousmaniere pfr@rousmaniere.com, 457-9149.

Fri, Jul 29: Aldrich Library, Barre, 6:30 p.m..  An All Ages Slam.  Free pizza is served at 6:30, followed by a quick writing exercise, which sometimes yields slammable results, and of course you’re encouraged to bring your best work that can be presented in 3 minutes or less. Should you write something terrific during the 7-minute writing exercise, you can choose whether to read from a prepared or brand-new manuscript!  Bring your friends and family; this is part of Barre’s weekend celebration!  This event is directed by Slam Master Geof Hewitt.  Info, Geof.Hewitt@myunion.edu.

Sat, Jul 30: Knoll Farm, Fayston, 10:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m..  Poetry Society of Vermont’s Annual Summer Meeting, Luncheon & Workshop.  Gary Margolis will lead the workshop.  Info, http://www.poetrysocietyofvermont.org/.

Sun, Jul 31: BigTown Gallery, 99 North Main, Rochester, 7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m..  Ellen Bryant Voigt.  Ms. Voigt will be reading for BigTown Gallery’s Summer Reading Series 2011.  She has published seven volumes of poetry – CLAIMING KIN (1976), THE FORCES OF PLENTY (1983), THE LOTUS FLOWERS (1987), TWO TREES (1992); KYRIE (1995), a finalist for the National Book Crit_ics’ Circle Award; SHADOW OF HEAVEN (2002), a finalist for the National Book Award; and MESSENGER: NEW AND SELECTED POEMS (2007), a finalist for the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize, and winner of the 2008 Poets’ Prize. She also co-edited an anthology of essays, POETS TEACHING POETS: SELF AND THE WORLD, and collected her own considerations of poetic craft in THE FLEXIBLE LYRIC (1999) and in THE ART OF SYNTAX: RHYTHM OF THOUGHT, RHYTHM OF SONG (2009). For her poems, which have been published in American Poetry Review, The Atlantic, The New England Review, The New Yorker, The Southern Review and Slate, she has received the Emily Clark Balch Award, the Hanes Poetry Award, the Teasdale Award, three Pushcart Prizes, inclusion in Scribner’s BEST AMERICAN POETRY, an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Academy of American Poets’ Fellowship, and grants from the National Endowment of the Arts, Guggenheim Foundation and Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Fund. Voigt designed and directed the nation’s first low-residency MFA Writing Program, at Goddard College, and she now teaches in its reincarnation at Warren Wilson College. She has also taught at Iowa Wesleyan College, M.I.T., the University of Cincin_nati, Breadloaf and other Writers Conferences, and in brief residencies at numerous colleges and universities. A former Vermont State Poet, she has been inducted into the Fellowship of Southern Writers and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and served as a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. She grew up in Virginia, went to school in South Carolina, and lives in Vermont.  There is a charge of $15 to attend this reading.

Tue, Aug 2: Book King, Center Street, Rutland, 7:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.. Vermont author, Yvonne Daley will be reading with writers from the Green Mountain Writers Conference who will share pieces from their work. The conference, held annually in Tinmouth, allows aspiring writers to work alongside and learn from published authors. For the first time, some of the conference participants and staff will come to Rutland to read from their work. The event, is free and open to the public.

Wed, Aug 3: St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 1171 Main Street, St. Johnsbury, 7:30 p.m.  Galway Kinnell & Greg Delanty.
Galway Kinnell was born in Providence, Rhode Island, on February 1, 1927. Greg Delanty was born in Cork, Ireland in 1958 and lives in Burlington, Vermont where he teaches at Saint Michael’s College.  He became an American citizen in 1994. Info, 748-8291, inform@stjathenaeum.org, http://www.stjathenaeum.org/.

Wed, Aug 10 – Sat, Aug 20: Bread Loaf Campus, Ripton. Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference. Well, here it is, an event I wait for all year.  A chance to sit in on lectures and readings of upcoming, established and famous poets from all over the nation. Public readings are given at least twice a day, and if one puts their ear to the ground, there are other readings as well.  If you’re lucky enough to live within a short driving distance of the conference, you should definitely make plans to attend.  I have a good friend who comes to the readings on a daily basis, and he lives in Hanover, NH!  Poets include, but are not limited to the following: Marianne Boruch, Louise GlŸck, Van Jordan, James Longenbach, Tom Sleigh, Arthur Sze, Ellen Bryant Voigt, John Elder, Philip Levine, Ted Genoways, Martha Rhodes, Michael Collier, director of the Conference, and Jennifer Grotz.

Sat, Aug 13: Village Square Books, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.. 2nd Saturday Open Mic Poetry.

  • Hear local poets from the River Voices Writing Group
  • Bring your own original work to share or read from a favorite author
  • Listen to poetry

Once a month, we schedule Poetry readings.  These might be Open Mic Sessions, or Readings by published authors. The tables in the cafe are gathered together as each member of the group takes a turn reading poetry aloud in a fun environment.  Call (802-463-9404) or email us to participate as a reader or let us know that you’ll be attending as a listener.  Village Square Booksellers provides light refreshments during the event.

Sun, Aug 14: BigTown Gallery, 99 North Main, Rochester, 5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m..  Tracy Winn & Joan Hutton Landis. Ms. Winn and Ms. Landis will be reading for BigTown Gallery’s Summer Reading Series 2011.

Tracy Winn, who earned her MFA from the Warren Wilson Program for Writers, is the recipient of grants from the Massachusetts Cultural Council, the Barbara Deming Memorial Trust, and the Arch and Bruce Brown Foundation, and fellowships from the MacDowell Colony and the Millay Colony. Mrs. Somebody Somebody, her debut collection of fiction, has been recognized as a Must Read by the Massachusetts Book Awards and as a finalist for the Julia Ward Howe Award. Her short stories have appeared in journals such as the Alaska Quarterly Review, The New Orleans Review, and Hayden’s Ferry Review. Tracy lives near Boston, Massachusetts, with her husband. She works with Gaining Ground, an organic farm that gives all of its produce away for hunger relief.

Joan Hutton Landis was born in Morristown, New Jersey. She majored in English at Bennington College, where she studied poetry with Stanley Kunitz, Howard Nemerov, and Ben Belitt.
After working in publishing, she married Kendall Landis and lived in Paris, Jeddah, Beirut, and Casa Blanca. During those years she wrote and published poetry and was active in theater. Returning to the States in 1967, with her husband and three sons, Landis studied poetry with Richard Wilbur at Wesleyan University, where she earned her masters degree. During that period her work was published in small journals, as well as in the Transatlantic Review and the New York Times.

Landis continued her education, earning a Ph.D. at Bryn Mawr. She was awarded a Danforth Graduate Fellowship for Women. Her articles on Shakespeare were published in Hamlet Studies, The Upstart Crow and the Shakespeare Quarterly, among others. Her reviews of the poetry of Louise Gluck, Ben Belitt, and John Peck appeared in Salmagundi.

In 1977 Landis began teaching at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, helping to form the core curriculum, initiating both poetry and fiction workshops and becoming the first Chair of the Liberal Arts Department. She participated in Frank Bidart’s poetry workshops at the New York Summer Writers’ Institute in Saratoga Springs, where she was encouraged to work on the manuscript that eventually became That Blue Repair.
Landis’s most recent poetry has appeared in Parnassus: Poetry in Review, The Gettysburg Review, Poetry and Salmagundi.

Sun, Aug 21: BigTown Gallery, 99 North Main, Rochester, 5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m..  Natalie Anderson. Ms. Anderson will be reading for BigTown Gallery’s Summer Reading Series 2011. Nathalie Anderson’s third book of poems, Quiver, has just been published by Rochester’s Penstroke Press, and she’ll be celebrating that publication in her BigTown reading.__  Nathalie Anderson’s first book, Following Fred Astaire, won the 1998 Washington Prize from The Word Works, and her second, Crawlers, received the 2005 McGovern Prize from Ashland Poetry Press. Her poems have appeared in such journals as APR’s Philly Edition, Atlanta Review, Denver Quarterly, DoubleTake, Inkwell Magazine, Journal of Mythic Arts, Louisville Review, Natural Bridge, The New Yorker, Nimrod, North American Review, Paris Review, Prairie Schooner, The Recorder, Southern Poetry Review, and Spazio Humano. Her work has been commissioned for the Ulster Museum’s collection of visual art and poetry titled A Conversation Piece; for the catalogue of the retrospective exhibition Sarah McEneany at the Institute of Contemporary Art of the University of Pennsylvania; and for the artist’s press book titled Ars Botanica published by Enid Mark of ELM Press. Her work appears in The Book of Irish American Poetry From the Eighteenth Century to the Present (Notre Dame), and her poems have twice been solicited for inclusion in The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror (St.Martin’s). Anderson has authored libretti for three operas – The Black Swan; Sukey in the Dark; and an operatic version of Arthur Conan Doyle’s A Scandal in Bohemia – all in collaboration with the composer Thomas Whitman and Philadelphia’s Orchestra 2001. A 1993 Pew Fellow, she serves currently as Poet in Residence at the Rosenbach Museum and Library, and she teaches at Swarthmore College, where she is a Professor in the Department of English Literature and directs the Program in Creative Writing.

Mon, Aug 22: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m..  Tim Seibles.  Tim Seibles is the author of several poetry collections including, Hurdy-Gurdy, Hammerlock, and Buffalo Head Solos. He was the poet-in-residence at Bucknell University in Pennsylvania for the spring semester of 2010. Most recently, his poems were featured in the Cortland Review and Ploughshares. His work was also published in the newly released anthologies, Black Nature and Seriously Funny. His next collection, Fast Animal, will be released from Cleveland State University Press in spring 2011. He lives in Virginia where he teaches writing at Old Dominion University. He is also visiting faculty for the Stonecoast MFA program in Maine.

Tue, Aug 23: The Galaxy Bookshop, 7 Mill Street, Hardwick, 7:00 – 8:00 p.m..  David Budbill. Poet/Playwright/YA Author David Budbill will appear at The Galaxy to read from his brand new book of poems, Happy Life, a meditation on life in Vermont. It is the third in series from Copper Canyon Press, following While We’ve Still Got Feet and Moment to Moment: Poems of a Mountain Recluse. Budbill is the recipient of the National Endowment for the Arts Play Writing Fellowship in Poetry in 1991, the Dorothy Canfield Fisher Award for Fiction in 1978, and the Walter Cerf Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Arts in 2002, presented by the Vermont Arts Council.

Sat, Sep 10: Village Square Books, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.. 2nd Saturday Open Mic Poetry.

  • Hear local poets from the River Voices Writing Group
  • Bring your own original work to share or read from a favorite author
  • Listen to poetry

Once a month, we schedule Poetry readings.  These might be Open Mic Sessions, or Readings by published authors. The tables in the cafe are gathered together as each member of the group takes a turn reading poetry aloud in a fun environment.  Call (802-463-9404) or email us to participate as a reader or let us know that you’ll be attending as a listener.  Village Square Booksellers provides light refreshments during the event.

Fri, Sep 23-Sun, Sep 25: Burlington Book Festival. The city’s seventh annual celebration of the written word is on the way. September 23 through 25 enjoy readings, signings, panels, workshops, exhibits, musical performances, demos and special events featuring literary luminaries from around the world-and just around the corner! All events are free and open to the public. This year’s headliners include Elinor Lipman, Ed Koren, Marie Howe, Douglas Kennedy, C. D. Wright, David Macaulay, Spencer Quinn, Myla Goldberg, John Elder Robison, Cynthia Lord and Philip Levine.
The Burlington Book Festival is copresented by Burlington Magazine and The Stern Center for Language and Learning. For a schedule and list of participants or to volunteer, you can call 802-658-3328 or read all about it at burlingtonbookfestival.com. (Poets are bolded.)

Thu, Sep 29: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m..  Patrizia Cavalli.  Patrizia Cavalli was born in Todi, Umbria, and lives in Rome. Since 1974, she has published five volumes of poetry with Einaudi, including Sempre aperto teatro, 1999 (Theatre Always Open) which won the prestigious Premio Viareggio Repaci and Pigre divinitˆ e pigra sorte, 2006 (Lazy Gods and Lazy Fate) for which she received the Premio Internazionale Pasolini. Bilingual editions of her poems have been published in France, Canada, Mexico, and Germany. She has contributed to numerous magazines and reviews, including Poetry and The New Yorker. Describing her work in The Vintage Book of Contemporary World Verse (1996), J.D. McClatchy observed “her style is hard-bitten, on the edge. The circumstances of a poem, although private, are never merely personal, they reach out to larger, more abiding and vulnerable realities.” Giorgio Agamben has characterized her verses as “a prosody…expressed in the most fluent, seamless, and colloquial language of 20th century Italian poetry.” Cavalli also has translated Moliere’s Amphytrion, Wilde’s Salome, Shakespeare’s The Tempest, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Othello.

Mon, Oct 3: Sherburne Memorial Library, 7:00 p.m..Killington Arts Guild’s A Gathering of Poets.  This is always a lively group, usually about 15 poets reading for 2-3 minutes each, then repeating the order, reading for another 2-3 minutes.  Refreshments.

Sat, Oct 8: Village Square Books, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.. 2nd Saturday Open Mic Poetry.

  • Hear local poets from the River Voices Writing Group
  • Bring your own original work to share or read from a favorite author
  • Listen to poetry

Once a month, we schedule Poetry readings.  These might be Open Mic Sessions, or Readings by published authors. The tables in the cafe are gathered together as each member of the group takes a turn reading poetry aloud in a fun environment.  Call (802-463-9404) or email us to participate as a reader or let us know that you’ll be attending as a listener.  Village Square Booksellers provides light refreshments during the event.

Fri, Oct 14 – Sun, Oct 16: Brattleboro Literary Festival. The Brattleboro Literary Festival celebrates its 10th anniversary with over 40 emerging and established authors in readings and special events. Featured authors include fiction authors André Aciman, Julia Alvarez, Richard Bausch, Anthony Doerr (winner- 2011 Story Prize), TŽa Obreht (winner – 2011 Orange Prize) and Luis Alberto Urrea; poets Stephen Dobyns, Mark Doty (winner -2008 National Book Award) Monica Youn and Kevin Young, Caldecott Award-winner and Norwich, VT resident David Macaulay; and NPR personalities Tom Bodett and Roy Blount, Jr. Free and open to the public. Info, http://www.brattleboroliteraryfestival.org.  (Poets are bolded.)

Sat, Oct 15: Poetry Society of Vermont’s Annual Fall Meeting, Luncheon & Workshop.  Location TBD.  Info, http://www.poetrysocietyofvermont.org/.

Mon, Oct 17: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m..  D. A. Powell.  D. A. Powell is the author of Tea, Lunch and Cocktails. His most recent collection, Chronic, was a finalist for the Publishing Triangle and the National Book Critics Circle Awards. Along with David Trinidad and a cast of hundreds, he is the co-author of By Myself: An Autobiography (Turtle Point, 2009). Powell’s honors have included fellowships from the Millay Colony, the National Endowment for the Arts and the James Michener Foundation, as well as a Pushcart Prize, the Lyric Poetry Award from the Poetry Society of America and an Academy of American Poets Prize. In 2010, he received the Kingsley Tufts Prize from Claremont University. D. A. Powell’s work appears in numerous anthologies, including Norton’s American Hybrids, Legitimate Dangers: Poets of the New Century and Best American Poetry 1998. His recent poems appear in Kenyon Review, Quarterly West, American Poetry Review, New England Review and Virginia Quarterly Review. Powell has taught at Columbia University, the University of Iowa’s Iowa Writers’ Workshop and New England College. A former Briggs-Copeland Lecturer in Poetry at Harvard University, he now teaches full-time in the English Department at University of San Francisco.

Sat, Nov 12: Village Square Books, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.. 2nd Saturday Open Mic Poetry.

  •  Hear local poets from the River Voices Writing Group
  • Bring your own original work to share or read from a favorite author
  • Listen to poetry

Once a month, we schedule Poetry readings.  These might be Open Mic Sessions, or Readings by published authors. The tables in the cafe are gathered together as each member of the group takes a turn reading poetry aloud in a fun environment.  Call (802-463-9404) or email us to participate as a reader or let us know that you’ll be attending as a listener.  Village Square Booksellers provides light refreshments during the event.

Sat, Dec 10: Village Square Books, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.. 2nd Saturday Open Mic Poetry.

  • Hear local poets from the River Voices Writing Group
  • Bring your own original work to share or read from a favorite author
  • Listen to poetry

Once a month, we schedule Poetry readings.  These might be Open Mic Sessions, or Readings by published authors. The tables in the cafe are gathered together as each member of the group takes a turn reading poetry aloud in a fun environment.  Call (802-463-9404) or email us to participate as a reader or let us know that you’ll be attending as a listener.  Village Square Booksellers provides light refreshments during the event.

Mon, Dec 12: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m..  Cyrus Cassells. Cyrus Cassells is the author of four acclaimed books of poetry: The Mud Actor, Soul Make a Path through Shouting, Beautiful Signor, and More Than Peace and Cypresses. His fifth book, The Crossed-Out Swastika, and a translation manuscript, Still Life with Children: Selected Poems of Francesc Parcerisas, are forthcoming. Among his honors are a Lannan Literary Award, a William Carlos Williams Award, a Pushcart Prize, two NEA grants, and a Lambda Literary Award. He is a tenured Professor of English at Texas State University-San Marcos and has served on the faculty of Cave Canem, the African American Poets Workshop. He divides his time between Austin, New York City, and Paris, and works on occasion in Barcelona as a translator of Catalan poetry.

  • Again, if you become aware of an event that isn’t posted above, please let me know. My apologies if I have left off anything of importance to any of you, but it can always be corrected in the next Vermont Poetry Newsletter.

La poesía
es la ruptura instantánea
instantáneamente cicatrizada
abierta de nuevo
por la mirada de los otros

Poetry
is a sudden rupture
suddenly healed
and torn open again
by the glances of the others

~ Octavio Paz

“One of the obligations of the writer, and
perhaps especially of the poet, is
to say or sing all that he or she can,
to deal with as much of the world as
becomes possible to him or her in language.”

~ Denise Levertov

Your Fellow Poet,

Ron Lewis

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