Vermont Poetry Newsletter • May 22 2011

[The Vermont Poetry Newsletter is not issued by me but by Ron Lewis, by whose permission I post this. PLEASE NOTE: I have edited his newsletter so that links are provided rather than text. If I cannot find a link, I will either omit the relevant portion of the newsletter to avoid copyright violations, or I will provide an alternate link. Please contact Ron Lewis if you would like to receive his Newsletter in full. All images are linked.]

Vermont Poetry Newsletter

Your Poetry & Spoken Word Gateway
In The Green Mountain State

May 22, 2011 (Previous issue: 04/22) –

In This Issue:

  1. About VPN
  2. Newsletter Editor/Publisher’s Note
  3. Writing Assignments/Suggestions/Exercises/Prompts
  4. Vermont Poet Laureate Information
  5. Bookstock in Woodstock
  6. Bloodroot Author Reading
  7. Mother’s Day Poem
  8. Poetry Out Loud
  9. Project O, Miami
  10. Interview With Charles Simic
  11. Why Not Poetry?
  12. Ted Hughes Archive
  13. Interview with Nii Ayikwei Parkes
  14. Passing of Gonzalo Rojas, Chilean Poet
  15. Archie Loves Robert Frost
  16. Interview With Sam Hamill on Translating Poetry
  17. Interview with Jean Connor
  18. Passager: Giving Voice to The Unheard
  19. Call for Submissions to NewPages.com
  20. Independent Publishers & University Presses
  21. Blogs by Poets & Writers
  22. Poetic License Poetry Workshops
  23. Slam Dunk!  Marc Smith, Founder of the Slam Movement
  24. PoetryPoetry.com
  25. Brooks Books Haiku
  26. Haiku Books, Poemcards, Chapbooks, Mini-Chapbooks
  27. An Evening of Poetry at the Whitehouse
  28. EPC: Electronic Poetry Center @ University of Buffalo
  29. The American Haiku Archives Web Site
  30. Haiku Canada
  31. What’s In That Box?  10 Poetry Books for $10
  32. Time Being Books
  33. Interview With Michael Collier
  34. 2011 Lecture Series @ Vermont Studio Center
  35. Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference 2011
  36. Great Poetry Links: Write Rhymes
  37. Poetry Quote – Emily Dickinson
  38. Linebreak Poem
  39. American Life in Poetry Poems
  40. US Poets Laureate List
  41. Vermont Poet Laureates
  42. US Poet Laureates From Vermont
  43. New Hampshire Poet Laureates
  44. US Poet Laureates From New Hampshire
  45. Contact Info for Editor/Publisher of VPN: Ron Lewis
  46. Vermont Literary Journals
  47. Vermont Literary Groups’ Anthologies
  48. Vermont Poetry Blogs
  49. State Poetry Society (PSOV)
  50. Year-Round Poetry Workshops in Vermont
  51. Other Poetry Workshops in Vermont
  52. Year-Round Poetry Writing Centers in Vermont
  53. Other Writing Groups in Vermont
  54. Poetry Event Calendar

About the Vermont Poetry Newsletter Network

The Vermont Poetry Newsletter Network is made up of people of all backgrounds, ages and skills who appreciate the craft of poetry and want to promote it in the beautiful state of Vermont. The network consists of a free e-mail list, an eventual web site, workshops, open mics, poetry performances and other literary events.  The network provides opportunities to meet local poets, talk about and enjoy poetry, and motivate and inspire yourself in whatever writing projects you are involved.

The mission of the Vermont Poetry Newsletter is to foster the poetry arts community in the Green Mountain State, home to more writers and poets per capita than any other state in the nation.  Its goals are to serve as a resource for and about VT poets; to support the development of individual poets; and to encourage an audience for poetry in Vermont.

Dating from 2009, the Vermont Poetry Newsletters are being archived on a blog maintained by poet Patrick Gillespie at PoemShape.

2.) Dear Friends of Poetry:

Well, here’s another Vermont Poetry Newsletter (VPN) to digest.  I hope that by providing a compendium of poetry-related stories and issues, you might see your VPN as a starting place to widen your investment in poetry, to connect with the full spectrum of this beautiful, living art.

I welcome those who have never before been made aware of this newsletter.  I’ve been at the task of putting a VPN out there for Vermont poets since 2003, and if you’re a charter reader, you’ve seen it blossom into this — something that always surprises, and I hope is always welcomed onto your computer screen!

By now, the Vermont Arts Council is hip-deep into its research of the nominations for Vermont’s new Poet Laureate.  (The deadline has passed for sending in your nomination.)  They cannot release any information on where they are currently in this difficult process, nor can they reveal any of the names of poets who were nominated.  There may come a day, after the entire selection activity, when I can reveal a few crumbs to the readership about this process, but no promises.  I will not release any information unauthorized by the Vermont Arts Council.  Thank you for your understanding on this issue.

A special note to the publication est, a Vermont literary magazine/journal, which is celebrating the beginning of its second year with issue 05!  I find this an extraordinary gem of a lit “zine” which is deserving of special attention in my own poetry library.  If you track down an issue (or back issue) for yourself, I’m certain you’ll find an appreciated place in your own library as well!

Ron Lewis
VPN Editor/Publisher
(802) 247-5913
vtpoet@gmail.com


3.) WRITING ASSIGNMENT • SUGGESTION EXERCISES

  • OTTER CREEK POETS EXERCISES & ASSIGNMENTS

Mind | Body

BY GREGORY DJANIKIAN

How do they survive, riven
as they are, the one undoing
the other’s desire?

Tell the body to outrun
the mind, and the mind smirks,
whispering too loudly
this way   this way,
blocking all the exits (….)

**Assignment: The mind/body problem.  Do you feel separation between mind and body?  Are you a body with a mind?  Or a mind with a body?  Where do you locate yourself?  What if you had to choose one or the other?  Write a poem about some aspect of the mind/body question.  It does not need to be philosophical, scientific, or even make sense.

(Exercise given by David Weinstock for the Otter Creek Poets)

PREVIOUS WRITING ASSIGNMENT • SUGGESTION • EXERCISE • PROMPT:

See Vermont Poetry Newsletter March 22 2011

4.)

Nominations leading to the appointment of Vermont’s next Poet Laureate are now under consideration by members of a special panel/committee.  Discussions from several scheduled meetings are all considered confidential.  The Governor’s formal appointment (proclamation) ceremony will be made in August/September of 2011.

On April 18, 2011, Vermont Public Radio’s Vermont Edition provided a talk about what’s happening around the state, poetry-wise, in celebration of National Poetry Month.  Guest poets included Julia Shipley, Geof Hewitt and Ben Aleshire, among others. To replay this interview, go to http://www.vpr.net/episode/50958/ and select “Poetry Is Abloom!”

Of most importance was a talk with Michelle Bailey, Program Director of the Vermont Arts Council on the selection process of the new state poet laureate.  To replay the MB interview, go to http://www.vpr.net/episode/50958/ and select “Vermont Poet Laureate Applications Being Reviewed.”

Be sure to play the other VPR interviews at this location as well!

5.)

Bookstock in Woodstock

Friday – Sunday, July 29-31, 2011

Bookstock, now in its third year, celebrates the written and spoken word for all ages and in all genres, free and open to the public.   Fiction, non-fiction and poetry authors of national and regional renown are included.   Workshops will be held on a variety of topics, as well as a show of book art.  Book sales, vendor exhibits and music will take place on the town Green.

Press and all other inquiries contact Peter Rousmaniere pfr@rousmaniere.com

The Green Mountain Festival of Words

12 PM – 4 PM on Saturday, July 30

Four major poets will be reading:

David Budbill One of Vermont’s most cherished poets, David is the author of seven books of poems, eight plays, a novel, fiction, essays, and is a performance poet on two CDs. Garrison Keillor reads frequently from David’s poems on his National Public Radio program The Writer’s Almanac. Among David’s prizes and honors are a Guggenheim Fellowship in Poetry and the Vermont Arts Council’s Walter Cerf Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Arts.

Cleopatra Mathis Bookstock is proud to have Dartmouth professor Cleopatra Mathis read from her works. She is the author of numerous collections of poetry, including What to Tip the Boatman? (2001), which won the Jane Kenyon Award for Outstanding Book of Poems.  The NY Times Book Review wrote, “[Cleopatra Mathis’ poetry] enthralls without throwing the reader off a cliff. And all the while she brandishes the gifts of a talented poet who has hit her stride.”  She directs the creative writing program at Dartmouth.

Wesley McNair Often referred to as “a poet of place,” New Hampshire native Wesley McNair captures the ordinary lives of northern New Englanders while writing about family conflict and other autobiographical subjects. He has lived for many years in Mercer, Maine, and has authored more than half a dozen collections of poetry. He has received many fellowships  Wesley has taught for several decades and is currently professor emeritus and writer in residence at the University of Maine at Farmington.

Sharon Olds  Sharon Olds is one of contemporary poetry’s leading voices. Winner of several prestigious awards, including the National Book Critics Circle Award, Sharon is known for writing intensely personal poetry which graphically depicts family life as well as global political events.   One reviewer for the New York Times said, “Her work has a robust sensuality, a delight in the physical that is almost Whitmanesque. She has made the minutiae of a woman’s everyday life as valid a subject for poetry as the grand abstract themes that have preoccupied other poets.” Her National Book Critics Circle Award-winning volume The Dead and the Living (1984) has sold more than 50,000 copies, ranking it as one of contemporary poetry’s best-selling volumes. She has been poet laureate of New York State.

  • To read some of their poetry, go to these sites:

David Budbill: http://www.davidbudbill.com/
Cleopatra Mathis: http://www.tryst3.com/issue12/mathis1.html
Wesley McNair: http://blackwidow.umf.maine.edu/%7Ewesmcnair/
Sharon Olds: http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/205

There will be 4 venues at Bookstock:

  1. The Town Hall for the 2 plenary sessions
  2. The Norman Williams Library Mezzanine and Library Reading Room for adult readings, its      History Room for Workshops
  3. The Woodstock History Center for children’s and adult authors, its Barn Gallery for workshops
  4. The Courthouse for the Poetry readings (*All poetry readings to happen here, from noon to 4 or 5) (a finalized schedule of readings will be available in your next VPN)


6.) Next Bloodroot author reading:

Wednesday, May 25th, 7:00 p.m.

Blake Memorial Library
676 Village Road
East Corinth, VT

Help support your Vermont Literary Magazines!

7.)

In case you missed it, here’s a nice Mother’s Day poem by Ted Kooser:

Mother
by Ted Kooser

Mid April already, and the wild plums
bloom at the roadside, a lacy white
against the exuberant, jubilant green
of new grass on the dusty, fading black
of burned-out ditches. No leaves, not yet,
only the delicate, star-petaled
blossoms, sweet with their timeless perfume.

You have been gone a month today
and have missed three rains and one nightlong
watch for tornadoes. I sat in the cellar
from six to eight while fat spring clouds
went somersaulting, rumbling east. Then it poured,
a storm that walked on legs of lightning,
dragging its shaggy belly over the fields.

The meadowlarks are back, and the finches
are turning from green to gold. Those same
two geese have come to the pond again this year,
honking in over the trees and splashing down.
They never nest, but stay a week or two
then leave. The peonies are up, the red sprouts
burning in circles like birthday candles,

for this is the month of my birth, as you know,
the best month to be born in, thanks to you,
everything ready to burst with living.
There will be no more new flannel nightshirts
sewn on your old black Singer, no birthday card
addressed in a shaky but businesslike hand.
You asked me if I would be sad when it happened

and I am sad. But the iris I moved from your house
now hold in the dusty dry fists of their roots
green knives and forks as if waiting for dinner,
as if spring were a feast. I thank you for that.
Were it not for the way you taught me to look
at the world, to see the life at play in everything,
I would have to be lonely forever.

8.) POETRY OUT LOUD

THE 2011 NATIONAL FINALS

From a competitive field of more than 365,000 students nationwide, 16-year-old Youssef Biaz of Auburn, Alabama, won the title of 2011 Poetry Out Loud National Champion at the National Finals held in Washington, D.C., on Friday, April 29. With his achievement, Biaz also received a $20,000 award and his high school, Auburn High School, received a $500 stipend for the purchase of poetry books.

The Poetry Out Loud National Finals were held at the historic Lincoln Theatre in Washington, D.C. Biaz was among nine finalists and 53 state champions from around the country who participated in the sixth national poetry recitation contest, sponsored by the Poetry Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. (….)

9.) Project O, Miami

Southern Florida is Saying, “We May Never See a Month So Full of Poetry.”

As O, Miami, the month long celebration of poetry, comes to an end, it’s time to reveal the identity of The Miami Herald’s very own fictional poet laureate, Herald Bloom, and the winner of our Haiku Challenge. Poems were literally everywhere in Miami during the month of April. They were thrown out of helicopters. Pinned to clothes at thrift stores. Blasted on a bullhorn from a Ferrari. Even printed in the newspaper, which broke a Golden Rule of not publishing them. It was all part of O, Miami, a guerrilla mission to bring a poem to every resident of Miami-Dade County. It all ends this weekend, with an Oscar-nominated actor reading his works. (….)

10.) Former U.S. Poet Laureate on war & poetry

By GENE MYERS

If there is ever an excuse to slip a little poetry into the paper, I’ll take it. April happens to be National Poetry Month. So, I’d like to introduce you to Charles Simic. He is one of my favorites. Simic has been U.S. Poet Laureate and has won numerous prizes for his work, including the Pulitzer Prize for poetry.

Born in 1938 in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, he is no stranger to war and its effects on people’s lives. With the current conflicts in the Middle East and Africa raging on, Simic’s own boyhood memories of a war-torn home can paint pictures the rest of us could never imagine. He knows what fleeing bombs while holding his mother’s hand feels like. He also knows how poetry can transform pain into compassion.

Q: “Flying Horses” from your book “That Little Something” seems both casual and emotional about living with war. There are men looking at girls while families feel like sitting ducks in a war zone. Is that what it’s like in a war torn town?

A: Of course, I grew up during the Second World War. When I was 3 years old bombs fell on our heads because the war started that was Yugoslavia, in Belgrade. Nazis bombed the city on April 6, 1941. I was there during the war and after. I have a pretty good idea what war is like…what happens when cities are bombed, villages are bombed, what happens, life goes on. People go on as best as they can to live their daily lives but every night, when the bombs fall, it’s a lottery, who lives or who dies. This is something that I understood when I was very young. There have been many wars since 1941—when the wars started for me. (….)

11.)

Why Not Poetry?

  • This is a very interesting question, put to task in a blog.  Evidently, the results are going to be put in a manuscript (troubles to writing & language), but I wouldn’t want to make heads and tails out of the responses.  Besides, isn’t the sample too small to draw any conclusions?  What if the question had instead been asked in the affirmative?

“This is a question for people who read widely, but don’t choose to read poetry. What are you’re reasons for not reading the stuff?

Be as frank as you can. I’m just trying to get a sense of how non-readers of poetry regard it, or find problematic about it, or what might have turned you off it, etc. I’m a poet working on his first manuscript and am too immersed to have a clear outsider viewpoint. But I’m curious and hoping to address some of these concerns in my work, or at least be conscious of them.”
posted by troubles to writing & language

—It’s hard enough for me to find prose I like. Poetry is even harder.
—That’s really kind of it.
—I do the majority of my reading before I go to bed. Poetry tends to require more attention than I want to expend at that point in my day. Sorry, I’m not sure that’s helpful or fixable, but it does answer your question.
—I’ve been trying to put my finger on the answer to this question for years, actually. Some very good friends of mine publish a poetry journal, one of them has had several of his own poetry books published, and a good many of my friends consider themselves poets. I just…I don’t know. I’m really picky about what I read (I tend to drift toward non-fiction most of the time), for sure, but I think it goes beyond that. I want a story, or facts. I don’t want little snippets of writing. (….)

12.)

Ted Hughes, archives and alligators: How – and why – writers’ papers end up in British and American libraries
By Stephen Enniss

From The Times Literary Supplement (UK)

In 1995 the manuscript dealer Roy Davids offered my library a manuscript draft of a single Ted Hughes poem. (At the time I was Curator of Literary Collections at Emory University in Atlanta.) The manuscript ran to several pages, and Roy was asking what seemed to me an exorbitant price. The university had a small Hughes collection already. The library had bought a copy of Hughes’s elephant folio Cave Birds and a small group of related manuscripts a few years before. Several other modest clutches of manuscripts had been added in the intervening years, including a small collection of Hughes’s letters to his friend Peter Redgrove. Unable to justify paying what he was asking for a single item, I recall telling Roy that this was no way to build an archive, one manuscript at a time. No, we would not buy the manuscript, but if he ever had anything more substantial to offer, he should let me know. I thought no more of the conversation until a year later when he called to tell me he was representing Ted Hughes in the sale of his archive and to ask whether Emory would be interested in purchasing the entire collection.

I was stunned. Hughes was the leading English poet of his generation; for more than a decade he had held the post of Poet Laureate, and he was known to be an exceedingly private person, one who shrank from interviews and other forms of public exposure. His complete archive was now being offered to a young American university whose chief virtue was unbridled ambition. Emory’s acquisition of the Ted Hughes archive – close to a hundred linear feet of letters, discarded manuscript drafts, reviews and clippings, snapshots, and other bits and pieces of his writing life – was widely reported in the press on both sides of the Atlantic. In the years immediately afterwards, other acquisitions followed, among them approximately half the archive of Seamus Heaney, and scores of other collections and archives, including those of Heaney’s fellow Irish poets Michael Longley, Derek Mahon and Paul Muldoon, those of the American poets James Dickey and Anthony Hecht, and that of the current British Poet Laureate, Carol Ann Duffy. (….)

13.)

  • Here’s an interesting article for those of you who doubt the virtuous intersection of jazz and poetry, or for those of you who have little doubt. – Ron

A Trunk Full of Random T-Shirts: A Conversation with Nii Ayikwei Parkes

by David Shook

I’ve been a fan of Ghanaian poet Nii Ayikwei Parkes’ work since I read his tall-lighthouse chapbook M is for Madrigal (2004). His first full-length collection, The Makings of You, has recently been released by Peepal Tree Press. In addition to his work as a poet, Parkes has published a novel, Tail of the Blue Bird (Jonathan Cape), and several other shorter works. He has contributed to a wide range of magazines and publications in Europe, Africa, and the Americas. In 2007 he was Writer-in-Residence at California State University—Los Angeles. We corresponded by email.

DS

I saw that you have a couple new poems in the current World Literature Today, which, I think, is about the intersection of jazz and poetry, right? I’m often skeptical of jazz poetry—sometimes the connection seems forced. But I know you’ve explored the connection between the blues and poetry, tell me about that. (….)

14.)

  • We lose another great Chilean poet – Gonzalo Rojas – Ron

Gonzalo Rojas, Chilean poet, is dead
Rojas, one of Latin America’s greatest modern writers, dies at the age of 93

Chilean poet Gonzalo Rojas, regarded as one of Latin America’s greatest modern writers, has died in Santiago at the age of 93, his family has announced.

Rojas, who was forced into exile after the 1973 military coup, died today after suffering a debilitating stroke two months ago, one of his sons said.

The poet won numerous literary awards in his time, including the 2003 Cervantes Prize – the top literary award for Spanish-language literature – the Chilean National Prize for Literature, the Queen Sofia Prize of Iberian American Poetry (awarded by the King of Spain), Mexico’s Octavio Paz prize and the Jose Hernandez Prize of Argentina.

15.)

Archie Loves Robert Frost

Robert Frost, was the Consultant in Poetry (Poet Laureate) at the Library of Congress from 1958 to 1959.  He is the most widely known poet of the 20th century, and his poetry continues to be enjoyed by millions of people, including–as it turns out–Archie Andrews of Archie Comics fame.  In the current issues, Archie is making decisions about his life, and imagines marrying Veronica Lodge and reading his favorite poem, “The Road Less Traveled” by Robert Frost, to their two children.  But, oops, in the very next issue of the comic, Archie goes down a lane that splits into two paths and takes a less-traveled one, just as Robert Frost described in his poem.  By choosing a different route for his walk, Archie’s story and his life change.

16.)

Interview With Sam Hamill on Translating Poetry
by Grant of Poet Core

Once a month I meet with a group of other poets at a local restaurant to talk about poetry and to workshop some poems. At a recent meeting we were looking over translations of Japanese poems by Sam Hamill, and we began discussing the subject of translations and the challenges they create for the translator and the reader.

To help answer a few of the questions, I decided to go to the source himself.

Hamill has published at least 14 volumes of his own poetry and about two dozen collections of translations from Chinese, Japanese, ancient Greek and Latin and more. He co-founded Copper Canyon Press and created Poets Against War.

How important is it that the translating poet be fluent in the language? Many people doing translations today work with someone who is fluent to get a literal translation, then the poet-translator steps in to take over.

There is no exact equation for great translation. Pound knew no Chinese and his source, Ernest Fenollosa, knew none, and Fenollosa’s sources, two Japanese art professors knew Li Po’s poetry only in Japanese, hence Pound “translating”  Rihaku—Li Po’s name in Japanese. Against all odds, we got 14 amazing poems, including one that is actually two poems combined. Pound’s “errors” have been noted time & again by his critics as well as by Chinese literary scholars. And yet the poems are among the most influential of the last century.

17.)

The Poetry of Catastrophe: A VPR Interview of Jean Connor
Neal Charnoff | Colchester, VT

(Host) Vermont poet Jean Connor had a fulfilling professional career, spending over thirty years as a New York State librarian. It wasn’t until her retirement in Shelburne that she began writing poetry. One of those poems was selected by U.S. Poet Laureate Ted Kooser for his series American Life in Poetry.

This interview, taken on 7/18/05, when Connor was 86 years young (she’s now 92 and still very active), came after she had published her first book of poetry, “A Cartography of Peace”. VPR’s Neal Charnoff spoke then with Conner about her new book.

Listen at: http://www.vpr.net/news_detail/73458/

Jean has now published a second book of poetry, A Hinge of Joy, is mentioned in the article below.

18.)

  • For those poets who find themselves 60 years of age or older, you might be interested in the market mentioned below.  – Ron

Passager: Giving Voice to The Unheard
February 21, 2011 | Patricia Valdata

Twenty years ago, Kendra Kopelke was teaching creative writing at the Waxter Center and marveling at the creative energy in her eighty- and ninety-year-old students, when it came to her: why not start a literary journal to give a creative voice to older writers? She thought it might last two years if she was successful.

She was successful, all right. Passager celebrated its 20th year of publication in 2010, publishing issue #50. And the labor of love is still going strong, with a Best of Passager anthology already in progress and a writer’s conference scheduled for June 17 & 18 at the University of Baltimore.
The literary journal is co-edited by Kopelke and good friend Mary Azrael. It has changed a bit since its black-and-white beginnings, with a color cover now, but the editors still use a square format that gives the pages room for long lines of poetry. The 50th issue features the prizewinning poems and honorable mentions from their annual poetry contest, and an interview with the winner, Sharron Singleton, who at 72 has been writing for the past 17 years.

“I realize it doesn’t matter when you start, you’re going to get old anyway whether you write or not. So you might as well begin,” Singleton writes. (….)

19.)

Calls for Submission!

Do I have your attention?  The web site “NewPages.com” offers weekly notices to literary magazines looking for submissions.  Take a look; you might want to bookmark this site!

Site location: http://www.newpages.com/literary/submissions.htm

20.)

Independent Publishers
& University Presses

The best online guide to independent & university book publishers

Book publishers, including independent publishers, university presses, and small presses listed in the NewPages guide are primarily from the U.S. and Canada.

Go to: http://www.newpages.com/book-publishers/

  • The best?  They just might be.  They’re certainly one of the best I’ve seen.  – Ron

21.)

Blogs by Poets & Writers

A nice, alphabetical listing of blogs and websites of poets & writers.

Go to: http://www.newpages.com/blogs/writers-blogs.htm

22.)

Poetic License
Poetry workshops for children and teens and for their teachers, counselors, and leaders

Workshops for Children and Teens

We are poets with a lifelong love of reading and writing poetry.  We are also teachers who have worked with hundreds of children and teens.

We customize and lead inspiring poetry workshops ranging from one day to one semester, suited to student constituency and curriculum or programming needs.  Workshops are tailored to fit within scheduling and budgetary constraints of schools and other organizations.  Our workshops may be offered during the school or camp day, or as part of after school programming or enrichment.  Programs can culminate in written student anthologies, student artwork that combines the written word with visual art forms, or student readings and recordings.

We are sensitive to the complex and time consuming demands on teachers and administrators.  Our workshops are designed and implemented with those demands in mind.

Programs & Services for
Teachers, Counselors, and Leaders

We offer an array of programming and consultation to support and facilitate teachers in their exploration of poetry with the  children and teens they work with.  Programs include professional development “in services,” informal brown bag lunches and before school coffees, and consultation tailored to the individual needs of school and program personnel.

Website

Our website is designed to inspire kids, teens, and their teachers! Learn more about the workshops and services we offer. Read poems by students we’ve worked with. Check out reviews of some of our favorite poetry books. Wander through the vibrant poetry community in Poetry Conversations. Kids and teens can try out our poetry activities and teachers can incorporate our exercises in their own classrooms!

23.) SLAM DUNK!

I know we have our own King of Slam in Geof Hewitt, but Marc Smith is claimed to be the Founder of the Poetry Slam Movement.  As stated in the PBS television series, The United States of Poetry, a “strand of new poetry began at Chicago’s Green Mill Tavern in 1987 when Marc Smith found a home for the Poetry Slam.”  Since then, performance poetry has spread throughout the country and across the globe to hundreds of cities, universities, high schools, festivals, and cultural centers.  Each year, teams from American and European cities compete in National Poetry Slams, extravagant homespun festivals blending thousands of poetic voices.  The Slam has taken root and is flourishing in Germany, the UK, Switzerland, France, Sweden, Denmark, Ireland, Italy, Madagascar, and Singapore.

Read about and listen to more from Marc Smith at: http://marckellysmith.com/?#/home/

On April 15, 2006, Chicago’s Marc Smith, creator of the Poetry Slam, performed his poetry at Unity Temple in Oak Park, IL. for their 3rd Saturday Coffeehouse program. Smith continues to host and perform every Sunday night to standing room crowds at the Green Mill Coctail Lounge at 4802 N. Broadway Ave., Chicago, IL. In addition to narrating the book/CD anthology “Spoken Word Revolution” and co-authoring “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Slam Poetry”, he has staged many creative poetry events for the public including The Neutral Turf Poetry Festival at Navy Pier, Slam Dunk Poetry Day at Chicago’s Field Museum and The Summer Solstice Poetry Show at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art. His collection of poems “Crowdpleaser” and his CD, “It’s About Time” are available at his website, http://www.slampapi.com. His populist poetry combined with his dynamic performance style keep him busy with readings around the country and the world.

Find out for yourself, and listen to the performance given by Marc Smith at Unity Temple, in Oak Park, Illinois, on April 15, 2006.  Go to: http://www.poetrypoetry.com/Features/MarcSmith/MarcSmith.php to find this collection of videos and audios (10+ of them!).

24.) poetrypoetry.com

Welcome to PoetryPoetry, a web site dedicated to audio poetry. The poems on PoetryPoetry are pre-recorded readings by the original artists.

Go to: http://www.poetrypoetry.com/

25.)

Brooks Books Haiku: About High/Coo Press & Brooks Books

Brooks Books, formerly High/Coo Press, publishes English-language haiku books, chapbooks, magazines and bibliographies. Founded in 1976 by Randy and Shirley Brooks, our goal is to feature the individual haiku as a literary event.

Brooks Books promotes the well-crafted haiku, with sensual images honed like a carved jewel, to evoke an immediate emotional response as well as a long-lasting, often spiritual, resonance in the imagination of the reader.

Brooks Books wants to rebuild the value of poetry, both to the reader and the writer. We do not give our publications away. We pay authors to publish their haiku, but we give away no free copies of the publication. Brooks Books exists to publish appreciated books and journals of excellent haiku. We are proud of the fact that our readers value our publications enough to buy them.

We publish only a few haiku in each of our publications. Brooks Books serves a readership loyal to our highly selective editing. Some haiku publications over-publish by including hundreds of haiku in a single publication, which forces the reader to become the editor or judge, choosing favorites, revising, or basically giving up the process of enjoying evocative haiku. Our publications are enjoyed and celebrated rather than skimmed, thumbed or analyzed. Our readership expects the highest quality haiku which we provide in small quantities, published with dignity and plenty of space for each haiku.

Poetry is suffering from a severe loss of readership. Schools have driven students away from the enjoyment of poetry and haiku with teachers’ over-emphasis on critical analysis and short-term writing exercises based on shallow definitions of poetic form. Free verse poets, with their over-emphasis on shocking subject matter and self-expression, have abandoned the disinterested public.

In contrast, the haiku community thrives, without government subsidy, and despite the shallow treatment of poetry and haiku in our schools. Haiku writers attempt to share moments of insight and keen perception of ordinary, daily experiences—not proclaiming the alienated voice of a poetic self. Haiku writers and readers come from all walks of life, but they write and read for the love of it.

Go to: http://www.brooksbookshaiku.com/aboutbrooksbooks/highcoopress.html

26.)

Here’s a highly unusual twist on things.  A video and book on the art of the haiku.  There’s also a video trailer that you can view in advance of any purchase.  In total, they offer 10 different books on haiku, plus “poemcards,” chapbooks, mini-chapbooks, and more!  —  Ron

A Gift for All

Haiku: The Art of the Short Poem is my gift to the people of the world—to anyone who has even the tiniest curiosity of interest to enter the universe of an ancient, but present-day, haiku amusement park. This film is a poetic playground vividly captured and put into a spectacle by the wonders of modern digital technology. I created it in a simple language of words, motion, color, and sound able to speak to anyone willing to listen and let their thirst for wonder feast on its counsel.

I created Haiku: The Art of the Short Poem to be a contemporary compass in which to navigate the vast, but concise, universe of haiku. Haiku is a short poem 
discovered by my Japanese people in Japan during the late 1600s and it is still alive and well, now being spoken and written in diverse ways throughout the landscapes of the English language. (….)

27.)

  • Kenneth Goldsmith — PennSound Senior Editor, professor in UPenn’s Center for Programs in Contemporary Writing and founder of UbuWeb — will be taking part in two events at the White House today. In addition to taking part in an evening event dubbed “An Evening of Poetry,” Goldsmith will also lead a poetry workshop for children with Michelle Obama. Here’s the complete press release from the White House:

“An Evening of Poetry”

Event Continues Arts Education Series at the White House on May 11th

The President and Mrs. Obama will host a celebration of American poetry and prose by welcoming accomplished poets, musicians and artists as well as students from across the country to the White House next week. Participants include Elizabeth Alexander, Billy Collins, Common, Rita Dove, Kenneth Goldsmith, Alison Knowles, Aimee Mann and Jill Scott who will read, sing, and showcase the impact of poetry on American culture. The President will make opening remarks at this event held in the East Room, which will be pooled press and streamed live on http://www.whitehouse.gov starting at 7:00 p.m. ET.

As part of this special event, Mrs. Obama will host a daytime workshop for hundreds of students from California to New York on May 11th at 2:00 p.m. ET, where students will work with and learn from many of the evening’s performers. First Lady Michelle Obama and administration officials will deliver brief remarks to highlight a new study detailing the importance of arts education. This event will be streamed live on http://www.whitehouse.gov and students all over the country will be invited to watch the workshop. This event is open press but space is very limited so please RSVP to firstladypress@who.eop.gov. (….)

28.) Electronic Poetry Center (EPC)

The EPC serves as a central gateway to resources in electronic poetry and poetics produced at the University at Buffalo as well as elsewhere on the Internet. Their aim is to make a wide range of resources centered on contemporary experimental and formally innovative poetries an immediate actuality. The Electronic Poetry Center contains a lot of writing, and there is more. The EPC offers a wide range of poetry and poetics resources.

Go to: http://epc.buffalo.edu/

29.) The American Haiku Archives Web Site

The advisory board for the American Haiku Archives (AHA) is pleased to announce the launch of its new website at www.americanhaikuarchives.org. The archives, founded in 1996, is the largest public archives of haiku and related poetry outside of Japan, and is the official home of the Haiku Society of America archives. Many individual donors have also contributed thousands of books and papers to the collection, which welcomes ongoing contributions from around the world, especially of new publications and personal papers relating to haiku. The new Web site features poems and biographical material about the current honorary curator, H. F. Noyes, and selected past curators. It also presents extensive information about the archives, its location and history, how to use it, how to make donations, and much more.

30.) Haiku Canada

Haiku Canada is a society of haiku poets and enthusiasts dedicated to: promoting the creation and appreciation of haiku and related forms (tanka, renga, senryu, sequences, haibun, and visual haiku) among its members and the public at large; and fostering association, friendship, communication and mutual support among haiku poets in Canada and abroad. Haiku Canada was founded in 1977 by Dr. Eric Amann, Betty Drevniok and George Swede. First called the Haiku Society of Canada, it was renamed Haiku Canada in 1985. Since the founding, members have shared information on haiku, haiku events, organizations, markets, and publications. Features: Newsletter, Haiku Canada sheets (10 poem collections of a featured poet’s work), Haiku Canada Members’ Anthology, membership directory, sponsors readings and workshops at annual meeting, world wide web site forthcoming, promotes members’ publications, convention at annual meeting, The Betty Drevniok Award.

Haiku Canada was founded in 1977 by Dr. Eric Amann, Betty Drevniok and George Swede. First called the Haiku Society of Canada, it was renamed Haiku Canada in 1985. Since the founding, members have shared information on haiku, haiku events, organizations, markets, and publications. Features: Newsletter, Haiku Canada sheets (10 poem collections of a featured poet’s work), Haiku Canada Members’ Anthology, membership directory, sponsors readings and workshops at annual meeting, world wide web site forthcoming, promotes members’ publications, convention at annual meeting, The Betty Drevniok Award.

Go to: http://www.haikucanada.org/

31.) What’s in that box?

When you buy one of SPD’s exclusive MYSTERY BOXES you will receive at least 9 high quality books of fiction and poetry for a mere $10. That amazing price includes Media Mail shipping to anywhere in the U.S.! The contents of each MYSTERY BOX have been hand-selected by our expert staff from our inventory of donated and/or very-mildly hurt books. Far from being rejects, many of the mystery books border on being the cream of the cream, or are at least surprisingly creamlike. Shall we say “creamesque”? In short, while you may not love every title you get in your MYSTERY BOX, we are sure you will end up with more than one title you will treasure for life. So roll the dice! These days you have to pay more than this for a super burrito….

Go to: http://www.spdbooks.org/Producte/MYSTERYBOX/the-mystery-box.aspx?rf=1

  • Special Tip!  When I asked if I could get nothing but poetry books in my order, rather than have a mix of poetry and fiction, here’s the response I received: “Just place your order on the site and write something to the effect of “all poetry” in the comments box. Otherwise, I’m happy to take your order via phone or email, I just need all the info that the site asks for.

Best,
Zack

About SPD: Small Press Distribution is a non-profit literary arts organization located in Berkeley, California. Our mission is to connect readers with writers by providing access to independently published literature.

32.)

  • Here’s a poetry book publisher you might find quite interesting. – Ron

Time Being Books

In 1988, Timeless Press undertook a daunting goal: to publish exceptional new American poetry, not as an amateur enterprise but as a full-fledged business. We were told over and over that it couldn’t be accomplished, that we wouldn’t survive long.

Twenty-two years, twenty-six authors, and 109 books later, many of those who dismissed us are out of business, but we’re still around. Our name has changed, and we are now a 501(c)(3)non-profit corporation, but our mission is the same: Time Being Books is dedicated, more than ever, to presenting great poetry that other publishers don’t have the foresight or courage to promote.

Poetry That Tells a Story

Because poetry began as a vehicle for storytelling, we feel it’s at its very best when it remains so. Our books are orchestrated works of verse, not randomly gathered poems. All our books are shaped narratively — often in “chapter” form — with the tale unfolding poem by poem, thus building toward closure and leaving the reader with the feeling of having participated in a growth process with the characters.

 Straightforward narration is essential in making poetry accessible to a wider audience, and that voice must be authentic, must ask readers to reach beyond the familiar confines of their “comfort zone.” We have made a conscious effort to publish poetry that is culturally diverse, never because it is the “politically correct” thing to do but because it is the best thing to do. What better way to harness the incredible power of poetry than to have it serve as a depiction of segments of America few of us will ever see for ourselves? By employing a medium that illuminates societal issues and captures concise insights in a way no other can, our books of poetry are meant to enlighten as well as engage.

Go to: http://www.timebeing.com/

33.)

  • Here’s an interview with Michael Collier by Brian Brodeur, for Brian’s online column How a Poem Happens.  I’m forever a Collier fan, and I get to rub shoulders with him every year at Bread Loaf! — Ron

Michael Collier

Michael Collier is the author of five books of poems: The Clasp and Other Poems; The Folded Heart; The Neighbor, The Ledge, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize; and most recently, Dark Wild Realm. He is also co-editor, along with Charles Baxter and Edward Hirsch, of A William Maxwell Portrait. His translation of Euripides’s Medea appeared in 2006 and a collection of essays, Make Us Wave Back: Essays on Poetry and Influence, in 2007. Collier has received Guggenheim and Thomas Watson fellowships, two National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, a “Discovery”/The Nation Award, the Alice Fay di Castagnola Award from the Poetry Society of America, a Pushcart Prize, and an Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Poet Laureate of Maryland from 2001–2004, he teaches in the Creative Writing Program at the University of Maryland and is the director of the Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference. He lives in Catonsville, Maryland.

THE MISSING MOUNTAIN

Cars could reach the mountain’s saddle,
a notch between two peaks, and there
survey the grid of lighted streets,
a bursting net of beads and sequins,
a straining movement cruising for release.

“As far as the eye could see,” though
few cared to look, was across the valley
to the other mountain, whose ridge
stood gaffed with broadcast towers, bright
harpoons quivering out our songs. (….)

When was this poem composed? How did it start?

I started writing “The Missing Mountain” on June 14, 2002 and, at least according to the last draft of it I have, I finished it July 10, 2003. I had made earlier but unsatisfactory attempts to write about a place I used to hang out on weekend nights with high school friends in Phoenix, Arizona, where I was born. The place was a saddle formed between two hills in the shadow of what was then called Squaw Peak, just off 12th Street, north of Northern Avenue. If you had a jeep, like one of my friends had, you could drive right up to the saddle and park. What you saw from it were the lights of the so-called Valley of the Sun running out to the south, east, and west—a huge twinkling, sparkling spectacle of lights. Overhead the sky was hammered full of stars, and if you turned north, away from the city, you reckoned with the tinny, jewel-like, spillage of the Milky Way. Sometimes we would go up there and drink beer and smoke dope, but often enough we just went for the vista and stood around scuffing the ground and spitting. The good thing, looking back, about being a teenage guy, especially in a place like Phoenix, Arizona, was that silence was a mode of comprehension, and for some of us it was the only evidence of intelligence.

34.)

  • Although the Vermont Poetry Newsletter lists all the poets who come to read at the Vermont Studio Center, there are other visiting artists and writers that I do not mention in the Poetry Event Calendar that you might be interested in hearing. Visit their website and 2011 Lecture Series at: http://www.vermontstudiocenter.org/visiting-artists-writers/

35.)

Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference 2011
August 10-20

  • Here’s the list you’ve been waiting for; get your books out to be signed!  I’ll keep you alerted to any Special (poetry) Guests (like Stanley Plumly last year) and the exact reading schedule for the Conference. The first scheduled event is a welcome and reading at 8:15 PM on August 10; the last day of the Conference, August 20, is a travel day.~ Ron

36.)

“Great Poetry Links”
Write Rhymes

Write Rhymes, a pared-down, no-frills web site designed by Foursquare staffer Matthew Healy, does essentially one thing: It finds rhymes.  Poets can enter text into a box, then option-click a word to produce a bubble of its rhyming counterparts, broken down by number of syllables.  Clicking one of the offered words adds it to the text box, which can be saved as a text file or printed on the spot.

37.)

“The truth is such a rare thing it is delightful to tell it.” ~ Poetry Quote by Emily Dickinson

38.)

Linebreak

  • Linebreak is an online journal with a bias for good poetry. Here is a poem from their web site this week:

To the Meerkat
BY SARAH GIRAGOSIAN
~ In Memory of LMG

This rapt, bandit-eyed mother,
scorpion-diner and foe to cobras,
is not a marauder, but rather
the obverse: upright and slightly simian
on her miniature mongoose legs.

Love is like the sole lookout,
the one who reconnoiters the desert
to keep her clan unharmed. Dear totem,
she telegraphs her cry across the wasteland
if any slinking or winged thing nears (….)

39.)

American Life in Poetry: Column 306
BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE, 2004-2006

My grandmother Moser made wonderful cherry pies from fruit from a tree just across the road from her house, and I have loved fruit trees ever since. A cherry tree is all about giving. Here’s a poem by Nathaniel Perry, who lives in Virginia, giving us an orchard made of words.

Remaking a Neglected Orchard

It was a good idea, cutting away
the vines and ivy, trimming back
the chest-high thicket lazy years
had let grow there. Though it wasn’t for lack
of love for the trees, I’d like to point out. (….)

American Life in Poetry: Column 307
BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE, 2004-2006

I like this poem by 97-year-old Lois Beebe Hayna of Colorado for the way it captures restrained speech. The speaker spends most of her words in describing a season, but behind the changes of spring another significant change is suggested.

Brief Eden

For part of one strange year we lived
in a small house at the edge of a wood.
No neighbors, which suited us. Nobody
to ask questions. Except
for the one big question we went on
asking ourselves. (….)

American Life in Poetry: Column 308
BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE, 2004-2006

Connie Wanek is one of my favorite poets. She lives in Duluth and has a keen eye for what goes on around her. Here’s a locked and loaded scene from rural America.

Mysterious Neighbors

Country people rise early
as their distant lights testify.
They don’t hold water in common. Each house
has a personal source, like a bank account,
a stone vault. Some share eggs,
some share expertise,
and some won’t even wave. (….)

American Life in Poetry: Column 309
BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE, 2004-2006

I love poems that celebrate families, and here’s a fine one by Joyce Sutphen of Minnesota, a poet who has written dozens of poems I’d like to publish in this column if there only were weeks enough for all of them.

The Aunts

I like it when they get together
and talk in voices that sound
like apple trees and grape vines,
and some of them wear hats
and go to Arizona in the winter,
and they all like to play cards.  (….)

American Life in Poetry: Column 310
BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE, 2004-2006

A friend saw a refrigerator magnet that read, PARENTING: THE FIRST 40 YEARS ARE THE HARDEST. And lots of parents, thinking their children have moved on, discover one day that those children are back. Here Marilyn L. Taylor, Poet Laureate of Wisconsin, writes of that.

Home Again, Home Again

The children are back, the children are back—
They’ve come to take refuge, exhale and unpack;
The marriage has faltered, the job has gone bad,
Come open the door for them, Mother and Dad. (….)

American Life in Poetry: Column 311|
BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE, 2004-2006

Peggy Shumaker lives in Alaska, but she gets around the world. Here she takes us with her on a ninety-foot dive into colorful mid-Pacific waters.

Night Dive

Plankton rise toward the full moon
spread thin on Wakaya’s surface.
Manta rays’ great curls of jaw
scoop backward somersaults of ocean
in through painted caves of their mouths, out
through sliced gills. (….)

40.)

Poets Laureate of the U.S.A.

A Net-annotated list of all the poets who have served the Library of Congress as Consultant (the old title) or Poet Laureate Consultant (the new title). Biographies & general reference sites are linked to the poets’ names — for the recent Laureates these are our own poet profiles with book-buying links at the bottom. Many of the other linked biographies are pages from the Academy of American Poets’ Find a Poet archive, a growing & invaluable resource. If there is no general information site about the poet, we have searched the Net for sample poems or other writings or recordings & listed those below the poet’s name.

Joseph Auslander 1937-41
Allen Tate 1943-44
Robert Penn Warren 1944-45
Louise Bogan 1945-46
Karl Shapiro 1946-47
Robert Lowell 1947-48
Leonie Adams 1948-49
Elizabeth Bishop 1949-50
Conrad Aiken 1950-52 (First to serve two terms)
William Carlos WilliamsAppointed to serve two terms in 1952 but did not serve — for more on this & other Laureate controversies see the history in Jacket magazine.
Randall Jarrell 1957-58
Robert Frost 1958-59
Richard Eberhart 1959-61
Louis Untermeyer 1961-63
Howard Nemerov 1963-64
Reed Whittemore 1964-65
Stephen Spender 1965-66
James Dickey 1966-68
William Jay Smith 1968-70
William Stafford 1970-71
Josephine Jacobsen 1971-73
Daniel Hoffman 1973-74
Stanley Kunitz 1974-76
Robert Hayden 1976-78
William Meredith 1978-80
Maxine Kumin 1981-82
Anthony Hecht 1982-84
Robert Fitzgerald 1984-85 Appointed and served in a health-limited capacity, but did not come to the Library of Congress
Reed Whittemore 1984-85 Interim Consultant in Poetry
Gwendolyn Brooks 1985-86
Robert Penn Warren 1986-87 First to be designated Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry
Richard Wilbur 1987-88
Howard Nemerov 1988-90
Mark Strand 1990-91
Joseph Brodsky 1991-92
Mona Van Duyn 1992-93
Rita Dove 1993-95
Robert Hass 1995-97
Robert Pinsky 1997-2000
Stanley Kunitz 2000-2001
Billy Collins 2001-2003
Louise Glück 2003-2004
Ted Kooser 2004-2006
Donald Hall 2006-2007
Charles Simic 2007-2008
Kay Ryan 2008-2010
M.S. Merwin 2010-Present

41.)

Historical List of Vermont Poets Laureate

July 26, 2007-Present: Ruth Stone, Goshen (b. June 8, 1915)
March 5, 2003 – July 25, 2007: Grace Paley, Thetford (b. December 11, 1922, d. August 22, 2007 of breast cancer)
1999-2002: Ellen Bryant Voigt, Cabot (b. May 9, 1943)
1994-1998: Louise Glück, Cambridge, MA (b. April 22, 1943)
1989-1993: Galway Kinnell, Sheffield (b. February 1, 1927)
July 22, 1961-1963: Robert Frost, Ripton (b. March 26, 1874, d. January 29, 1963 of pulmonary embolism)

Position History:
 According to a February 7, 2003 press release from the Vermont Arts Council, “Robert Frost was declared Poet Laureate in 1961 [upon the adoption of Joint House Resolution 54 by the General Assembly]. In 1988 Governor Kunin re-established the position. (Reference: Executive Order No 69, 1988) Galway Kinnell was the first State Poet named for a term of 4 years as a result of this order in 1989.” The Arts Council further notes that “at the direction of the Governor [it] conducts the selection process for the State Poet by convening an advisory/selection panel. The Vermont State Poet is a person whose primary residence is in Vermont; whose poetry manifests a high degree of excellence; who has produced a critically acclaimed body of work; and who has a long association with Vermont.”

42.)

Historical list of United States Poets Laureate from Vermont

1958-1959: Robert Frost, Ripton (b. March 26, 1874, d. January 29, 1963 of pulmonary embolism)
August, 2003-2004: Louise Glück, Cambridge, MA (b. April 22, 1943)

43.)

Historical List of New Hampshire Poets Laureate

March 2004 – Present: Charles E. Butts
January 2006 – March 2009: Patricia Fargnoli
March 2004 – December 2005: Cynthia Huntington
October, 1999 – March 2004: Marie Harris, Barrington
December 1995 – March 1999: Donald Hall, Wilmot
January 1995 – March 1999: Jane Kenyon, Wilmot
March 1989 – March 1994: Maxine Kumin, Warner
June, 1984 – January 1989: Donald Hall, Danbury
January 1979 – January 1984: Richard G. Eberhart, Hanover
August 1972 – December 1978: Eleanor Vinton, Concord
September 1968 – July 1972: Paul Scott Mowrer

44.)

Historical list of United States Poets Laureate from New Hampshire

2007-2008: Charles Simic, Strafford
2006-2007: Donald Hall, Wilmot
1981-1982: Maxine Kumin, Warner
1959-1961: Richard Eberhart
1958-1959: Robert Frost, Derry

45.) If you ever have a need to contact me, here’s how to go about doing so:

Ronald Lewis:
Phone: 802-247-5913
Cell: 802-779-5913
Home: 1211 Forest Dale Road, Brandon, VT 05733
Email: vtpoet@gmail.com

46.) VERMONT LITERARY JOURNALS

1) The Queen City Review

The QCR is also on FacebookBurlington College’s The Queen City Review is a yearly journal of art and literature and accepts the work of new and established writers and artists in the areas of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, memoir, photography, and fine art, as well as essays and criticism on all aspects of the aforementioned. They seek to publish high quality work that ranges 3) broadly in topic and genre.

The Queen City Review can be purchased by 2-year subscription or individually. The price of one issue is $8 plus shipping charges ($1) for a total of $9. Subscriptions can be purchased for $14 plus shipping charges ($2) and includes the Fall 2010 and upcoming 2011 issues. Copies can also be purchased in the Writing Center or at the front desk. They accept cash, check, and credit cards (Visa and Mastercard). You can mail your payment to them or by calling (802) 862-9616 ext. 234 to place your order over the phone. If mailing your payment, mail details to:

ATTN: Heidi Berkowitz Sadler
Faculty, Interdisciplinary Studies
Coordinator, The Writing Center
Editor, The Queen City Review
Burlington College
95 North Avenue
Burlington, VT 05401

If you have any further questions, you can contact Heidi at:
T: 802-862-9616
E: hsadler@burlington.edu

2) Bloodroot

Bloodroot is a nonprofit literary magazine dedicated to publishing diverse voices through the adventure of poetry, short fiction, and creative nonfiction. Their aim is to provide a platform for the free-spirited emerging and established writer.

The price of a single issue is $8.

Editor, “Do” Roberts
Bloodroot Literary Magazine
PO Box 322
Thetford Center, VT 05075
(802) 785-4916
email: bloodroot@wildblue.net

3) New England Review

A publication of Middlebury College, a high quality literary magazine that continues to uphold its reputation for publishing extraordinary, enduring work. NER has been publishing now for over 30 years.

Cost: $10 for a single current issue
$30 for a single year (4 issues)
$50 for two years (8 issues)

New England Review
Attn: Orders
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753

Email: NEReview@middlebury.edu
(800) 450-95714) Willard & Maple

A Literary and Fine Art Magazine of Champlain College, Burlington.

Willard & Maple
163 South Willard Street
Freeman 302, Box 34
Burlington, VT 05401

email: willardandmaple@champlain.edu

5) Vermont Literary Review

A Literary and Fine Art Magazine of Castleton State College, Castleton.

The first issue of Vermont Literary Review was published in 1994. The review is published once a year. Work featured in the review includes poetry, fiction, drama, and personal essays from and about New England.

From its inception until 2006, students and professors reviewed the work submitted and selected work to be published. They used to jointly edit and design the review as well. After a brief lapse, the Vermont Literary Review has resumed publication in 2008 as a journal edited and designed solely by English Department faculty. The Literary Club, which used to help create this journal, is now putting out a publication of student work. (….)

6) Green Mountains Review


A Literary and Fine Art Magazine of Johnson State College, Johnson; in publication since 1987. One of two literary journals published by the college, the other being The Gihon River Review (below).

The Green Mountains Review is an international journal publishing poems, stories, and creative nonfiction by both well-known authors and promising newcomers. The magazine also features interviews, literary criticism, and book reviews. Neil Shepard is the general editor and poetry editor of the Green Mountains Review. The fiction editor is Leslie Daniels.

The editors are open to a wide range of styles and subject matter. If you would like to acquaint yourself with some of the work that we have accepted in the past, then we encourage you to order some of our back issues (….)

7) The Gihon River Review

“The name of the second river is Gihon. No sooner has it come out of Paradise than it vanishes beneath the depths of the sea . . .” –Moses Bar Cepha

The Gihon River Review, published biannually, was founded in the fall of 2001 as a production of the BFA program at Johnson State College. Issues are $5 each. Submissions in poetry, fiction, and nonfiction are read from September to May. Poetry submissions may not exceed five poems; fiction and nonfiction may not exceed twenty-five pages. Send all correspondence to The Gihon River Review, Johnson State College, Johnson, Vermont 05656. Please enclose a SASE. For further info by email, grr@jsc.vsc.edu.

8) Burlington Poetry Journal

The Burlington Poetry Journal is a new nonprofit publication interested in creating a means for provoking opinions, ideas, and thoughtful responses for poets in the Greater Burlington area. The Burlington Poetry Journal is an independent publication that is dedicated to the concept that art should be free and accessible to everyone. In a world with so many voices we believe in a community based, eclectic approach to the publication of poetry. Therefore, the BPJ will always welcome any form or style within its pages.While there are numerous outlets for writers to gather and share privately in Vermont, there is no publication that brings together poetry of all styles and writers of all ages for the enjoyment of the general public. It is our hope that this journal will inspire writers to share their work with others who may be unaware of their talent, and for those who have never considered themselves writers to try their hand at poetry. We invite you to submit your work and share with others your thoughts and abilities with the Burlington community. The work you share will produce a dialogue as writers become aware of each other and begin to expose themselves and others to new poetry. The eclectic nature of the Burlington Poetry Journal will serve to stimulate its readers and authors. They are currently working towards achieving a non-profit 501(c)3 status.

8) Tarpaulin Sky

Founded in 2002 as an online literary journal, Tarpaulin Sky took the form of 12.5 internet issues (see the archive) before its first paper edition in November 2007, and the magazine continues to publish new work both online and in print. In addition to these issues, Tarpaulin Sky publishes work by individual authors in its “chronic content” section, as well as online-only book reviews

Tarpaulin Sky focuses on cross-genre / trans-genre / hybrid forms as well as innovative poetry and prose. The journal is not allied with any one style or school or network of writers; rather, we try to avoid some of the defects associated with dipping too often into the same literary gene pool, and the diversity of our contributors is evidence of our eclectic interests (….)10) The Mountain Review

Colchester High School’s English Department has been publishing an interesting literary magazine: The Mountain Review. The Mountain Review is sponsored by the Vermont Council of Teachers of English Language Arts (VCTELA). Generally, the mission is to publish work from Vermont students, K-12. The Mountain Review has published poems, essays, short stories, excerpts from larger works, and art work. Wayland Cole and Katie Lenox have been the editors for several years; both teach at Colchester. Before them, Shelia Mable, a South Burlington teacher, was the editor for many years.

2009’s Mountain Review is over 100 pages long!

Students at all Vermont schools can enter the competition to be published in the Mountain Review. If you have questions, feel free to call them at (802) 264-5700 or email at colew@csdvt.org or lenoxk@csdvt.org. Send orders for copies of The Mountain Review to Katie Lenox at: Colchester High School, PO Box 900, Colchester, VT 05446. Send $5 per book; $2 postage to ship 1-3 books. Checks payable to the VCTELA.

11) The Salon: A Journal of Poetry & Fiction

The Honeybee Press is a brand-new writer’s cooperative based in Burlington, Vermont. The first book from the press is its bi-annual literary magazine, The Salon: A Journal of Poetry & Fiction. The goal of the press is to produce high-quality local literature and make it more affordable and visible to the public. To submit to The Salon, see the guidelines listed on its web address.

  • Click on link for submission guidelines.

12) Hunger Mountain

Hunger Mountain is both a print and online journal of the arts. We publish fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, visual art, young adult and children’s writing, writing for stage and screen, interviews, reviews, and craft essays. Our print issue comes out annually in the fall, and our online content changes on a regular basis. (….)

Hunger Mountain Subscriptions

Vermont College of Fine Arts
36 College Street
Montpelier, VT 05602

Subscription Prices
One Year $12.00
Two Year $22.00
Four Year $40.00 (Save $8!)
Back issues $8.00

13) The Onion River Review

The Onion River Review is a literary journal whose annual edition features poetry, prose, and visual arts. The Onion River Review is edited by the students of Saint Michael’s College in Vermont, and is committed to publishing work from students, faculty, staff, alumni, and the greater community.

The Onion River ReviewWilliam Marquess, Advisor
One Winooski Park #171
Colchester, VT 05439

14) Route Seven – The St. Albans Literary Guild Magazine

The first issue of the Saint Albans Literary Guild’s magazine, Route Seven: A Vermont Literary Journal, is a 56-page publication featuring new and established writers and artists with an emphasis on Northwestern Vermont writers. Strong literary and non-fiction voices from other regions are also featured and are encouraged to submit to future issues.

ST. ALBANS: The Saint Albans Literary Guild is proud to announce the release of the premiere issue of Route 7, a new Vermont literary journal, on Sat., Feb. 20, at the STAART Gallery in St. Albans. The event will feature readings from contributing authors, as well as hors d’oeuvres and beverages.
Route 7 is a 56-page magazine featuring fiction, non-fiction, humor, poetry, and artwork. The first issue includes a wide range of moods, from the introspective and idyllic to the offbeat and humorous. The more than 20 contributors included hail from Franklin County, and across Vermont and New Hampshire. The magazine aims to highlight creative voices from across the region. (….)

15) Vantage Point

Vantage Point is the arts and literary journal at the University of Vermont. VP is a student-run journal, supported by generous funding from the Student Government Association at UVM, which allows them to circulate the journal to students and the general public for free. They also receive funding from the Mary Brigham Buckham Fund, through UVM’s English Department.

Vantage Point was established in 2002 by a group of students in the Honors College who felt that UVM needed a literary journal. In the past, they have published strictly student work, however this past semester they opened up the submission pool to faculty and to the general public. They are continuing to go that route this semester as well.

16) est

est is a publication of literary and visual art.

It serves as an outlet for creative people to share their work freely with others.

With technology affirming its ever-present role in media and communication, it can be difficult to find an alternative that is as accessible and timely. Contrary to the endless supply of self proclaimed material from bloggers and youtubers, est works to sustain the precious art form of a handmade publication. All issues are of a limited edition and offer a unique perspective on the fears, humor and sensitivities of our world. Peer revision and interactive projects at the release events also help introduce and network contributors with each other. Past issues of est feature poetry, short fiction, drawing, photography, comics, DIY instructions and interactive projects. Each edition of 100 zines are hand numbered and bound by a pamphlet stitch.

Hard copies are available at select retailers as well as online via mail order. 
Subscriptions are also available.

est is available for viewing and purchase at these locations:

Speaking Volumes – Burlington, VT
Boutilier’s – Burlington, VT
Battery Street Jeans – Burlington, VT
Earth Prime Comics – Burlington, VT
Village Wine & Coffee – Shelburne, VT
Brown Dog Books – Hinesburg, VT

Direct correspondence to Heather Bischoff, Solicitor/Editor, at estpress@gmail.com

47.)

VERMONT LITERARY GROUPS’ ANTHOLOGIES

1) Vermont Voices, An Anthology

Published by the League of Vermont Writers periodically. They have just published their 3rd anthology.

  • Vermont Voices I (published in 1991)
  • Vermont Voices II (published in 1995)
  • Vermont Voices III (published in 1999)

2) *See Below

Published by the Otter Creek Poets periodically. They have just published their 3rd volume.

  • By the Waterfall (published in 1999)
  • Maps and Voyages (published in 2004)
  • Line By Line (published in 2006)

No web site to date. All editions and issues out of print and no longer available.

3) League of Vermont Writers

Published by the Mad River Poets periodically. They have just published their 3rd volume.

  • Pebbles from the Stream (published in 2002)
  • Maps and Voyages (published in 2004)
  • Line By Line (published in 2006)

4) The Mountain Troubadour

  • Published by the Poetry Society of Vermont annually.

48.) VERMONT POETRY BLOGS

1) PoemShape

Patrick Gillespie maintains a bright, intelligent blog. There is a decided bias in favoring poetry that is written in meter, that uses form, or that plays with language in ways that separate poetry from prose – rhetoric, imagery, simile, metaphor, conceit, rhyme, meter — Traditional Poetry.

PoemShape is now the home of the Vermont Poetry Newsletter & Poetry Event Calendar.

One can subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new postings by email.

49.)

STATE POETRY SOCIETY

The Poetry Society of Vermont, founded in 1947, is an association of poets and supporters who join in promoting an interest in poetry through meetings, workshops, readings, contests, and contributions to the society’s chapbook. Anyone may join the society including high school and college students and non-residents of Vermont. We welcome both writers and appreciative readers.Membership in PSOV

Benefits:
  • 2 luncheon/ workshops a year where a professional poet critiques your poems
  • one hands- on writing workshop and reading under the direction of a professional poet
  • the opportunity to enter contests judged by professional poets and to win awards
  • fellowship with appreciative readers and writers of poetry
  • opportunity for publication in the PSOV chapbook, The Mountain Troubadour
How to join:
mail dues of $20.00 to Membership Chairman, P.O. Box 1215, Waitsfield, VT 05673
include your name, mailing address, telephone, and e-mail address for Membership List
memberships are renewed by January 1 of each year
The PSOV has 2 current books available for sale:
1) The Mountain Troubadour – 2010 – Curl up with interesting, award-winning poetry from a wonderful group of poets. This book is only $8 (+$1 to mail). To get yourself a copy, call or write to Betty Gaechter, 134 Hitzel Terrace, Rutland, VT 05701, 773-8679. This little booklet may be just the thing to get you involved with the PSOV for a lifetime of friendships.
2) Brighten the Barn – 60th Anniversary Anthology – 1947-2007 – An Anthology of Poems by Members of the Poetry Society of Vermont. 99 pages of quality poetry; that’s a lot of beautiful poetry for only $12. If you get it through me (Ron Lewis), it’s only $12. If you want it shipped to you, the PSOV wants an extra amount to cover tax and shipping ($0.72 + $3.00). This book retails for $15, but a reduced price is now in play to unload the few remaining copies.

50.) YEAR-ROUND POETRY WORKSHOPS IN VERMONT


BELLOWS FALLS

1) Great River Arts Institute – See details elsewhere in this newsletter

2) Poetry Workshop at Village Square Booksellers with Jim Fowler (no relation to owner Pat). The goal of this course is to introduce more people to the art of writing poetry and will include a discussion of modern poetry in various forms and styles. Each week, the course will provide time to share and discuss participant’s poetry. Poetry Workshops on Monday mornings (9:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m.) – Jim Fowler’s sessions continue, with periodic break for a few weeks between sessions. Students should bring a poem and copies to the first class. The course will be limited to 5 to 8 students to allow adequate time to go through everyone’s poetry contributions and will meet in the café at Village Square Booksellers. James Fowler, of Charlestown, New Hampshire, has a Masters Degree in Environmental Science with a major in Nature Writing. He was the editor of Heartbeat of New England, a poetry anthology. Fowler has been widely published since 1998 in such journals as Connecticut Review, Quarterly of Light Verse, and Larcom Review. Fowler is a founding member of the River Voices Writer’s Circle, and a regular reader at Village Square Booksellers-River Voices Poetry Readings. The fee for this 6-week Workshop is $100, payable to Mr. Fowler at the first class. Pre-registration for the Poetry Workshop is suggested and may be made by calling Village Square Booksellers at 802-463-9404 or by email at vsbooks@sover.net or jfowler177@comcast.net.

3) InkBlot Complex Poetry Workshop runs through the Vermont Independent Media’s Media Mentoring Project and is held at the Rockingham Public Library at 65 Westminster Street in Bellows Falls. No previous writing or journalism experience or even class attendance is required. Participants are invited to bring a project or share successful techniques. The workshop aims to lift poetry from the page and reveal how it is a living force in daily life. Originally taught at the University of Illinois at Chicago to great acclaim, its interactive nature and inclusion of multiple art forms leaves dry, academic notions of poetry behind. It functions through three tenets: 1) Presentation of the art form as a living element of our daily world, 2) individualized, personal enrichment and free range of expression for each student, and 3) artistic cultivation through unexpected means. Taught by seasoned arts journalist, cultural critic and poet Clara Rose Thornton, this free event explores the poetry we encounter all around us – in songs we hear, the ways we express ourselves, even the advertisements we see. In the final session students then create their own works with an increased sense of connection to the way words construct meaning. All materials are provided. Instructor Clara Rose Thornton is an internationally published film, wine and visual arts critic, music journalist, poet and former book and magazine editor. Her writings on culture and the arts have appeared nationally in Stop Smiling: The Magazine for High-Minded Lowlifes, Honest Tune: The American Journal of Jam and Time Out Chicago. Currently residing in an artists’ colony in Windham County, she acts as the biweekly arts columnist for the Rutland Herald, staff writer for Southern Vermont Arts & Living and a regular contributor to The Commons. A portfolio, bio and roster of writing and editing services can be found at www.clararosethornton.com. For more information about the Media Mentoring Project, visit www.commonsnews.org or call 246-6397. You can also write to Vermont Independent Media at P.O. Box 1212, Brattleboro, VT 05302.

For more on the InkBlot Complex Poetry Workshop, see description under Other Poetry Workshops in Vermont (Anywhere, VT).

BERLIN

The Wayside Poets, who share their poetry publicly from time to time, have been meeting irregularly for the past 25 years. They used to be called The Academy Street Poets. Membership is by invitation only. They meet now at the Wayside Restaurant & Bakery in Berlin. Members include Diane Swan, Sherry Olson, Carol Henrikson and Sarah Hooker. You can contact them through Sherry Olson at: solsonvt@aol.com or 454-8026.

BURLINGTON

The Cherry Lane Poets are a small group (7-8) of poets that meet on the first Thursday of every month. The membership has been kept to a minimum so that poets will have all the time they need during critiques. Each poet has been or is a member of another poetry critiquing group, so the information passed to each other is more professional than that of most poetry groups. The primary goal of this group is to polish their work, get it submitted, and have it published. Each member brings a new poem with them, with enough copies to pass around, and reads it aloud to the group; it gets critiqued by each member during the following month, and those critiques are presented at the next meeting. Regina Brault is the contact person, (802) 860-1018; membership is by invitation only.

The Burlington Poets Society, a group of “stanza scribblers” that express their love of verse, made up of UVM students and professors, have recently organized, meeting at the Fleming Museum at UVM in Burlington for their periodic “The Painted Word” series of poetry readings.

GUILFORD

The Johnson Writer’s Group, newly formed on January 26, 2011, meets weekly on Wednesday evenings from 7:00 to 9:00, at the Johnson Public Library on Railroad Street, in the front room. This is a free drop-in prompt writing group modeled after the Burlington Writing Group that’s been going strong for many years now. The writers themselves decide on a prompt and write for 20 minutes, followed by a go-around reading. They usually get in two writes depending on the group’s size. All genres and experience levels are welcomed and there really are no rules other than not interrupting folks while they are writing. They don’t really do much critiquing though some spontaneous reactions do occur! This group believes that it’s just good practice to show up and write for 40 minutes and share the writing if so inclined… Feel free to join this group on a perpetual basis or whenever you’re in town. Contact is Cynthia Hennard at (802) 363-5541 or (802) 730-8125.

JOHNSON

The Guilford Poets Guild, formed in 1998, meets twice a month to critique and support each other’s work. Their series of sponsored readings by well-known poets which began at the Dudley Farm, continues now at the Women and Family Life Center.

MIDDLEBURY

1.) The Otter Creek Poets offer a poetry workshop every Thursday afternoon, from 1:00 to 3:00 in the basement meeting room of the Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main Street, Middlebury. This workshop, the largest and oldest of its kind in the state, has been meeting weekly for 13 years. Poets of all ages and styles come for peer feedback, encouragement, and optional weekly assignments to get the poetry flowing. Bring a poem or two to share (plus 20 copies). The workshops are led by David Weinstock. There is considerable parking available behind the library, or further down the hill below that parking lot. For more information, call David at 388-6939 or Ron Lewis at 247-5913.

2) The Spring Street Poets. This group is by invite only and consists of six members, Jennifer Bates, Janet Fancher, Karin Gottshall, Ray Hudson, Mary Pratt and David Weinstock.

MONTPELIER: Vermont College of Fine Arts

Established in 1981, the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing Program was one of the first low-residency programs in the country. The Atlantic named it one of the top five low-residency programs nationwide. At each MFA in Writing residency, a renowned poetry or prose writer joins the program for a substantial portion of the residency. The author gives a reading and/or talk, meets with numerous students individually, and is available in many informal ways throughout the residency to interact with students. The College publishes Hunger Mountain: the VCFA Journal of the Arts and writers may choose to attend a summer residency in Slovenia, in lieu of Vermont.

PANTON

This town is the home of Leonard Gibbs and his Dead Creek Poets Society. Leonard Gibbs is a member of the Otter Creek Poets and Poetry Society of Vermont, is the Magister Ludi of The Dead Creek Poets’ Society. Leonard invites visitors to his web site, Quibbles.com, and subsequent comments for discussion; send him some of your poetry for free critiques! He’s really very good. Leonard’s email address is: ML_Len@Quibbles.org. Interesting responses to items Leonard has posed on his site may end up on the site itself.

Leonard also publishes the Poet’s Corner, a regular monthly column in the Addison Independent. The newspaper has recently informed Len that they would like to have more poetry published in their newspaper, so Len is asking poets from anywhere in Vermont to send him material for him to review for future articles in Poet’s Corner.

NORWICH

This group meets on the first Sunday of every month at the Norwich Library, 6:30 p.m.

SAINT ALBANS

The Saint Albans Literary Guild organizes author readings, classes on writing and literature, and other book related events. The Guild is sponsoring a new literary magazine featuring local writers. Finally, it promotes Vermont authors, book groups, writing groups, and literary events held in Franklin County and northwestern Vermont. Contact us for more information or join the Guild to become involved with literary endeavors in your area.

The first issue of the Saint Albans Literary Guild’s magazine, Route Seven: A Vermont Literary Journal, is a 56-page publication featuring new and established writers and artists with an emphasis on Northwestern Vermont writers. Strong literary and non-fiction voices from other regions are also featured and are encouraged to submit to future issues.

Contact them through their web site or through Jay Fleury, Guild President.

SPRINGFIELD

A Writer’s Group has started to meet at the Springfield Town Library on the fourth Monday of each month, from 7 to 8 pm. For more information, call 885-3108.

STOWE

There is another poetry workshop happening in Stowe, but unfortunately I know nothing much about this group. If you do, contact me!

WAITSFIELD

The Mad River Poets consists of a handful of poets from the Route 100 corridor. More on this group in the future.


51.)

OTHER POETRY WORKSHOPS IN VERMONT

BURLINGTON

Scribes in the making put pen to paper as part of an open verse-writing session at the Fletcher Free Library, 235 College Street. Contact information: 862-1094.

ANYWHERE, VERMONT

Revived for the 2009 academic year is the InkBlot Complex Poetry Workshop, designed for upper-elementary and high-school-age students, grades 7-12. The curriculum functions through three tenets:

  • Innovative presentation of the art form as a living element of our daily world
  • Individualized, personal enrichment and free range of expression for each student
  • Artistic cultivation through unexpected means

The workshop debuted at the University of Illinois at Chicago, during a three-week summer program, entitled Project C.H.A.N.C.E., for underprivileged sophomore and senior students from area high schools. It was a fantastic success, and the program director requested its return. With this encouragement, I decided to expand and adapt the workshop for various age levels, as an educational/arts supplement for after-school programs and enrichment programs and an arts elective for more traditional academic settings. The response has been wonderful. (…) Click on Typewriter for more…

WHITE RIVER JUNCTION

The Writer’s Center
58 Main Street, White River Junction, Vermont

Instructor: April Ossmann (author of Anxious Music, Four Way Books, 2007, writing, editing and publishing consultant, and former Executive Director of Alice James Books)

Info: (802)333-9597 or aprilossmann@hotmail.com and http://www.aprilossmann.com.

52.)

YEAR-ROUND POETRY WRITING CENTERS IN VERMONT

BURLINGTON

The Burlington Writer’s Group (BWG) meets on Tuesday evenings from 7-9 PM and has a new home at the Unitarian Church in the church’s little white house off of Clark St., 2nd floor. They’d like to let people know and also invite anyone interested to join them whenever folks are in town or as often as they’d like.

The Burlington Writer’s Group is a free drop-in group. They decide on a prompt and write for 20 minutes, followed by a go-around reading. They can usually get in two writes depending on group size. All genres and experience levels are welcome and there really are no rules other than demonstrating courtesy while people are writing (don’t interrupt). They don’t do much critiquing though some spontaneous reactions occur. Mainly it’s good practice to just show up and write for 40 minutes and share the writing, if so inclined…

BURLINGTON

Women Writing for (a) Change supports the authentic experience of women who honor themselves through creative writing. Our community supports reflection as we move into our questions and awaken to change. Participants enhance expressive skills, strengthen their voices, deepen themselves as women as writers for positive change in all spheres of life. Creative writing in all genres is our shared vehicle. Women Writing for (a) Change is for women who, 1) dream of writing for self-discovery, for personal or social healing, 2) hunger for creative process in their lives, 3) yearn to explore their feminine voice, 4) crave reflective, space, and 5) are in transition. For more information, go to their web site at www.leagueofvermontwriters.org or contact Sarah Bartlett at either 899-3772 or sarah@womenwritingvt.com.

JOHNSON

Vermont Studio Center

Founded by artists in 1984, the Vermont Studio Center is the largest international artists’ and writers’ Residency Program in the United States, hosting 50 visual artists and writers each month from across the country and around the world.

The Vermont Studio Center offers four-to-twelve-week studio residencies year-round to 600 painters, sculptors, printmakers, photographers, and writers (50 residents per month). VSC’s 30-building campus is set on the banks of the Gihon River in rural Johnson, Vermont, a town of 3,000 located in the heart of the northern Green Mountains. Each Studio Center residency features undistracted working time, the companionship of fifty artists and writers from across the country and around the world, and access to a roster of prominent Visiting Artists and Writers. All residencies include comfortable housing, private studio space, and excellent food. Two Visiting Writers per month are in residence for one week each to offer readings, a craft talk, and optional conferences with each of the 10-14 writers in residence each month.

MONTPELIER

Vermont College of Fine Arts

Established in 1981, the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing Program was one of the first low-residency programs in the country. The Atlantic named it one of the top five low-residency programs nationwide. At each MFA in Writing residency, a renowned poetry or prose writer joins the program for a substantial portion of the residency. The author gives a reading and/or talk, meets with numerous students individually, and is available in many informal ways throughout the residency to interact with students. The College publishes Hunger Mountain: the VCFA Journal of the Arts and writers may choose to attend a summer residency in Slovenia, in lieu of Vermont.

SPRINGFIELD

A Writer’s Group has started to meet at the Springfield Town Library on the fourth Monday of each month, from 7 to 8 pm. For more information, call 885-3108.

WHITE RIVER JUNCTION

The Writer’s Center is for serious writers and nervous beginners. It’s for procrastinators who could benefit from regular deadlines – and for the prolific who could benefit from quality feedback. It’s for anyone with a manuscript hidden in a drawer, or a life story or poem waiting to be written. It’s for people who don’t know where to start or how to end. And for writers who are doing just fine on their own, but would like the company of other writers. The Writer’s Center is for anyone who is writing or wants to write. One of the Center’s consultants is April Ossman. Founded by Joni B. Cole and Sarah Stewart Taylor, the Writer’s Center offers instruction and inspiration through a selection of workshops, discussions, and community. We would love to see you – and your writing – at The Writer’s Center!

  • The Writer’s Center” has a new Facebook Page that we’re now using to spread the word about workshops, offer writing tips, share publishing news, etc. If you haven’t already, be a part of the page by following the link below and clicking “like”. Write on!

53.)

OTHER WRITING GROUPS IN VERMONT

The League of Vermont Writers.

The League is open to all who make writing a part of their lives. We offer encouragement, motivation, and networking opportunities to writers with a broad range of writing experience.
You do not need to be published to join. Visit their Membership Page for more information about benefits and fees.
Founded in 1929, LVW’s mission is to:

  • Help writers develop their skills
  • Promote responsible and ethical writing and writing practices
  • Increase communication between professional writers and publishers
  • Promote an enduring appreciation for the power of the word

The LVW publishes Vermont Voices, An Anthology, at irregular times. They have published 3 separate volumes to date.

54.)

POETRY EVENT CALENDAR

Below please find the most current list of poetry happenings in Vermont for the near future.  Please be aware that these events can be found on Poetz.com, but there is usually additional information that is typed here that would be cumbersome to place on Poetz.com.  Please note all events are Vermont-based unless they are of extreme importance or happen to lie just outside our borders.  If you would like to save on paper and ink, please just highlight what you need, or perhaps only events for the coming month, and print that information.  All events are advertised as free unless indicated otherwise.

Fri, May 27: FlynnSpace, 153 Main Street, Burlington, 7:00 p.m..  Teen Slam.  Sponsored by Vermont’s Young Writers Project, this promises to be quite possibly to best slam you’ve ever attended, as many of the area’s best slammers will be in attendance.

Mon, May 30: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m..  Jane Hirshfield.  Jane Hirshfield is the author six poetry collections, most recently After (HarperCollins), named a best book of 2006 by The Washington Post, The San Francisco Chronicle, and England’s Financial Times. Other honors include major fellowships from the Academy of American Poets, National Endowment for the Arts, and the Guggenheim and Rockefeller foundations. Her seventh poetry collection will be published by Knopf in August, 2011. Hirshfield is also the author of a now-classic collection of essays, Nine Gates: Entering the Mind of Poetry and three equally classic books collecting the work of women poets of the past. Her work appears in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, the TLS, The New Republic, Poetry, and five editions of The Best American Poems. For more information on Jane Hirshfield, visit Barclay Agency’s website.

Wed, Jun 1: Rutland Free Library, 10 Court Street, Rutland, Nella Fox Room, 7:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m..  Poetry of the Earth: Re-imagining Nature. New Hampshire Poet Laureate and Dartmouth Professor Cynthia Huntington explores poetry’s changing language of nature and spirit in the contemporary works of Mary Oliver, Jane Kenyon, and Mark Doty.  Info, Dan Amsberry, programs@rutlandfree.org, http://www.rutlandfree.org.

Thu, Jun 9: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m..  Natasha Trethewey.  Natasha Trethewey is author of Native Guard (Houghton Mifflin), for which she won the 2007 Pulitzer Prize; Bellocq’s Ophelia (Graywolf, 2002) which was named a Notable Book for 2003 by the American Library Association; and Domestic Work (Graywolf, 2000). She is the recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Study Center, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Bunting Fellowship Program of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard. Her poems have appeared in such journals and anthologies as American Poetry Review, Callaloo, Kenyon Review, The Southern Review, New England Review, Gettysburg Review, and several volumes of Best American Poetry. At Emory University she is Professor of English and holds the Phillis Wheatley Distinguished Chair in Poetry.

Sat, Jun 11: Village Square Books, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.. 2nd Saturday Open Mic Poetry.

  • Hear local poets from the River Voices Writing Group
  • Bring your own original work to share or read from a favorite author
  • Listen to poetry

Once a month, we schedule Poetry readings.  These might be Open Mic Sessions, or Readings by published authors. The tables in the cafe are gathered together as each member of the group takes a turn reading poetry aloud in a fun environment.  Call (802-463-9404) or email us to participate as a reader or let us know that you’ll be attending as a listener.  Village Square Booksellers provides light refreshments during the event.

Mon, Jun 27: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m..  Ray Gonzalez.  Ray Gonzalez is the author of twelve books of poetry including Faith Run (University of Arizona Press, 2009), Cool Auditor: Prose Poems (BOA Editions, 2009) The Hawk Temple at Tierra Grande (2003 Minnesota Book Award for Poetry), and Consideration of the Guitar: New and Selected Poems (2005). Turtle Pictures (Arizona, 2000) received the 2001 Minnesota Book Award for Poetry. His poetry has appeared in the 1999, 2000, and 2003 editions of The Best American Poetry. He is Director of the MFA Creative Writing Program at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

Wed, Jun 29: Moore Free Library, 23 West Street, Newfane, 7:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m..  Local Voices.  The Library continues to host “Local Voices,” writers from our community reading from their unpublished works on the last Wednesday of each month. Sign up to read at 6:45 pm.  The event is organized by Deborah Lee Luskin and Elizabeth Macalaster.  Info, 365-7948 or newfanemoore@vals.state.vt.us.

Sat, Jul 9: Village Square Books, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.. 2nd Saturday Open Mic Poetry.

  • Hear local poets from the River Voices Writing Group
  • Bring your own original work to share or read from a favorite author
  • Listen to poetry

Once a month, we schedule Poetry readings.  These might be Open Mic Sessions, or Readings by published authors. The tables in the cafe are gathered together as each member of the group takes a turn reading poetry aloud in a fun environment.  Call (802-463-9404) or email us to participate as a reader or let us know that you’ll be attending as a listener.  Village Square Booksellers provides light refreshments during the event.

Mon, July 25: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m..  Marie Howe.  Marie Howe is the author of three volumes of poetry, The Kingdom of Ordinary Time (2008); The Good Thief (1998); and What the Living Do (1997), and is the co-editor of a book of essays, In the Company of My Solitude: American Writing from the AIDS Pandemic (1994). Stanley Kunitz selected Howe for a Lavan Younger Poets Prize from the American Academy of Poets. She has, in addition, been a fellow at the Bunting Institute at Radcliffe College and a recipient of NEA and Guggenheim fellowships. Her poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Poetry, Agni, Ploughsahres, Harvard Review, and The Partisan Review, among others. Currently, Howe teaches creative writing at Sarah Lawrence College, Columbia, and New York University.

Fri-Sun, Jul 29-31: Woodstock, at various locations (see below).  Bookstock. Bookstock, now in its third year, celebrates the written and spoken word for all ages and in all genres, free and open to the public.   Fiction, non-fiction and poetry authors of national and regional renown are included; in all, over 30 authors, actors, musicians and artists.   Workshops will be held on a variety of topics, as well as a show of book art.  Book sales, vendor exhibits (a large exhibitor tent for publishers and other vendors) and music will take place on the fabled town Green, as well as food concessions.  Also, there will be special offers from Woodstock’s retail merchants.

There will be 4 venues at Bookstock:

  1. The Town Hall for the 2 plenary sessions
  2. The Norman Williams Library Mezzanine and Library Reading Room for adult readings, its History Room for Workshops
  3. The Woodstock History Center for children’s and adult authors, its Barn Gallery for workshops
  4. The Courthouse for the Poetry readings (*All poetry readings to happen here, from noon to 4 or 5) (a finalized schedule of readings will be available in your next VPN)
  • All poetry readings will be held at the Courthouse on Saturday, July 30th, fron noon to 4:00 (or 5:00).  Readers will be David Budbill, Cleopatra Mathis, Wesley McNair, and Sharon Olds. Info, contact Peter Rousmaniere pfr@rousmaniere.com, 457-9149.

Sat, Aug 13: Village Square Books, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.. 2nd Saturday Open Mic Poetry.

  • Hear local poets from the River Voices Writing Group
  • Bring your own original work to share or read from a favorite author
  • Listen to poetry

Once a month, we schedule Poetry readings.  These might be Open Mic Sessions, or Readings by published authors. The tables in the cafe are gathered together as each member of the group takes a turn reading poetry aloud in a fun environment.  Call (802-463-9404) or email us to participate as a reader or let us know that you’ll be attending as a listener.  Village Square Booksellers provides light refreshments during the event.

Mon, Aug 22: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m..  Tim Seibles.  Tim Seibles is the author of several poetry collections including, Hurdy-Gurdy, Hammerlock, and Buffalo Head Solos. He was the poet-in-residence at Bucknell University in Pennsylvania for the spring semester of 2010. Most recently, his poems were featured in the Cortland Review and Ploughshares. His work was also published in the newly released anthologies, Black Nature and Seriously Funny. His next collection, Fast Animal, will be released from Cleveland State University Press in spring 2011. He lives in Virginia where he teaches writing at Old Dominion University. He is also visiting faculty for the Stonecoast MFA program in Maine.

Sat, Sep 10: Village Square Books, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.. 2nd Saturday Open Mic Poetry.

  • Hear local poets from the River Voices Writing Group
  • Bring your own original work to share or read from a favorite author
  • Listen to poetry

Once a month, we schedule Poetry readings.  These might be Open Mic Sessions, or Readings by published authors. The tables in the cafe are gathered together as each member of the group takes a turn reading poetry aloud in a fun environment.  Call (802-463-9404) or email us to participate as a reader or let us know that you’ll be attending as a listener.  Village Square Booksellers provides light refreshments during the event.

Thu, Sep 29: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m..  Patrizia Cavalli.  Patrizia Cavalli was born in Todi, Umbria, and lives in Rome. Since 1974, she has published five volumes of poetry with Einaudi, including Sempre aperto teatro, 1999 (Theatre Always Open) which won the prestigious Premio Viareggio Repaci and Pigre divinità e pigra sorte, 2006 (Lazy Gods and Lazy Fate) for which she received the Premio Internazionale Pasolini. Bilingual editions of her poems have been published in France, Canada, Mexico, and Germany. She has contributed to numerous magazines and reviews, including Poetry and The New Yorker. Describing her work in The Vintage Book of Contemporary World Verse (1996), J.D. McClatchy observed “her style is hard-bitten, on the edge. The circumstances of a poem, although private, are never merely personal, they reach out to larger, more abiding and vulnerable realities.” Giorgio Agamben has characterized her verses as “a prosody…expressed in the most fluent, seamless, and colloquial language of 20th century Italian poetry.” Cavalli also has translated Moliere’s Amphytrion, Wilde’s Salome, Shakespeare’s The Tempest, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Othello.

Mon, Oct 3: Sherburne Memorial Library, 7:00 p.m..Killington Arts Guild’s A Gathering of Poets.  This is always a lively group, usually about 15 poets reading for 2-3 minutes each, then repeating the order, reading for another 2-3 minutes.  Refreshments.

Sat, Oct 8: Village Square Books, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.. 2nd Saturday Open Mic Poetry.

  • Hear local poets from the River Voices Writing Group
  • Bring your own original work to share or read from a favorite author
  • Listen to poetry

Once a month, we schedule Poetry readings.  These might be Open Mic Sessions, or Readings by published authors. The tables in the cafe are gathered together as each member of the group takes a turn reading poetry aloud in a fun environment.  Call (802-463-9404) or email us to participate as a reader or let us know that you’ll be attending as a listener.  Village Square Booksellers provides light refreshments during the event.

Sat, Oct 15: Poetry Society of Vermont’s Annual Fall Meeting, Luncheon & Workshop.  Location TBD.  Info, http://www.poetrysocietyofvermont.org/.

Mon, Oct 17: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m..  D. A. Powell.  D. A. Powell is the author of Tea, Lunch and Cocktails. His most recent collection, Chronic, was a finalist for the Publishing Triangle and the National Book Critics Circle Awards. Along with David Trinidad and a cast of hundreds, he is the co-author of By Myself: An Autobiography (Turtle Point, 2009). Powell’s honors have included fellowships from the Millay Colony, the National Endowment for the Arts and the James Michener Foundation, as well as a Pushcart Prize, the Lyric Poetry Award from the Poetry Society of America and an Academy of American Poets Prize. In 2010, he received the Kingsley Tufts Prize from Claremont University. D. A. Powell’s work appears in numerous anthologies, including Norton’s American Hybrids, Legitimate Dangers: Poets of the New Century and Best American Poetry 1998. His recent poems appear in Kenyon Review, Quarterly West, American Poetry Review, New England Review and Virginia Quarterly Review. Powell has taught at Columbia University, the University of Iowa’s Iowa Writers’ Workshop and New England College. A former Briggs-Copeland Lecturer in Poetry at Harvard University, he now teaches full-time in the English Department at University of San Francisco.

Sat, Nov 12: Village Square Books, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.. 2nd Saturday Open Mic Poetry.

  • Hear local poets from the River Voices Writing Group
  • Bring your own original work to share or read from a favorite author
  • Listen to poetry

Once a month, we schedule Poetry readings.  These might be Open Mic Sessions, or Readings by published authors. The tables in the cafe are gathered together as each member of the group takes a turn reading poetry aloud in a fun environment.  Call (802-463-9404) or email us to participate as a reader or let us know that you’ll be attending as a listener.  Village Square Booksellers provides light refreshments during the event.

Sat, Dec 10: Village Square Books, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.. 2nd Saturday Open Mic Poetry.

  • Hear local poets from the River Voices Writing Group
  • Bring your own original work to share or read from a favorite author
  • Listen to poetry

Once a month, we schedule Poetry readings.  These might be Open Mic Sessions, or Readings by published authors. The tables in the cafe are gathered together as each member of the group takes a turn reading poetry aloud in a fun environment.  Call (802-463-9404) or email us to participate as a reader or let us know that you’ll be attending as a listener.  Village Square Booksellers provides light refreshments during the event.

Mon, Dec 12: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m..  Cyrus Cassells. Cyrus Cassells is the author of four acclaimed books of poetry: The Mud Actor, Soul Make a Path through Shouting, Beautiful Signor, and More Than Peace and Cypresses. His fifth book, The Crossed-Out Swastika, and a translation manuscript, Still Life with Children: Selected Poems of Francesc Parcerisas, are forthcoming. Among his honors are a Lannan Literary Award, a William Carlos Williams Award, a Pushcart Prize, two NEA grants, and a Lambda Literary Award. He is a tenured Professor of English at Texas State University-San Marcos and has served on the faculty of Cave Canem, the African American Poets Workshop. He divides his time between Austin, New York City, and Paris, and works on occasion in Barcelona as a translator of Catalan poetry.

  • Again, if you become aware of an event that isn’t posted above, please let me know. My apologies if I have left off anything of importance to any of you, but it can always be corrected in the next Vermont Poetry Newsletter.

La poesía
es la ruptura instantánea
instantáneamente cicatrizada
abierta de nuevo
por la mirada de los otros

Poetry
is a sudden rupture
suddenly healed
and torn open again
by the glances of the others

Octavio Paz

“One of the obligations of the writer, and
perhaps especially of the poet, is
to say or sing all that he or she can,
to deal with as much of the world as
becomes possible to him or her in language.”

Denise Levertov

Your Fellow Poet,

Ron Lewis

One response

  1. Pingback: Vermont Poetry Newsletter • July 28 2011 « PoemShape

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