Vermont Poetry Newsletter • March 22 2011

[The Vermont Poetry Newsletter is not issued by me but by Ron Lewis, by whose permission I post this. PLEASE NOTE: I have edited his newsletter so that links are provided rather than text. If I cannot find a link, I will either omit the relevant portion of the newsletter to avoid copyright violations, or I will provide an alternate link. Please contact Ron Lewis if you would like to receive his Newsletter in full. All images are linked.]

Vermont Poetry Newsletter

Your Poetry & Spoken Word Gateway
In The Green Mountain State

March 22, 2011 (Previous issue: 01/26) –
In This Issue:

  1. About VPN
  2. Newsletter Editor’s Note
  3. Writing Assignments/Suggestions/Exercises/Prompts
  4. Call for Nominations for New Vermont Poet Laureate
  5. Photo of Donald Hall Receiving National Medal of the Arts
  6. World Poetry Day – March 21st
  7. Messege from UNESCO, Founders of World Poetry Day
  8. A Poet’s Impluvium
  9. The Mountainous State of American Poetry
  10. The 2011 Chapbook Festival
  11. Fashion Extremes: Celebrate Your Unique Style
  12. Akilah Oliver (1961-2011)
  13. James Franco Talks Poetry
  14. James Copeland of Ugly Duckling Press
  15. Interview With Sam Hamill on Translating Poetry
  16. The Poetry of Catastrophe
  17. Irish Poets Who Live Off the Island
  18. Public Library in Detroit
  19. Why We Hate Poetry Readings
  20. Chapbook Archive: Ugly Duckling Press
  21. Suheir Hammad: Poems of War, Peace . . .
  22. Clara Rose Thorton: Vice & Verses
  23. Federal Funding for the Cowboy Poets
  24. Book Review: The Age of Auden by Aidan Wasley
  25. Lawrence Matsuda (Japanese-American)
  26. The 10 Best American Poems
  27. Elizabeth Bishop Paintings
  28. JamesSJaffeRareBooks.com
  29. Adrienne Rich on “Tonight No Poetry Will Serve”
  30. On Reviewing: David Orr
  31. Basic bard: Kooser’s accessible poetry maddens some
  32. In the Company of Amy Clampitt
  33. Book Review: Anthology of International Poetry
  34. Book Review: Carl Phillips latest
  35. Chase Twichell Wins $100,000
  36. Litany by David Budbill
  37. 31 Books in 31 Days: Clare Cavanagh
  38. Woodberry Poetry Room Collection @ Harvard
  39. Poetry Festival Teacher’s Guide
  40. Great Poetry Links: Badilisha Poetry Radio
  41. Poetry Quote – Richard Hugo
  42. Linebreak Poem
  43. American Life in Poetry Poems
  44. US Poets Laureate List
  45. Vermont Poet Laureates
  46. US Poet Laureates From Vermont
  47. New Hampshire Poet Laureates
  48. US Poet Laureates From New Hampshire
  49. Contact Info for Editor of VPN: Ron Lewis
  50. Vermont Literary Journals
  51. Vermont Literary Groups’ Anthologies
  52. Vermont Poetry Blogs
  53. State Poetry Society (PSOV)
  54. Year-Round Poetry Workshops in Vermont
  55. Other Poetry Workshops in Vermont
  56. Year-Round Poetry Writing Centers in Vermont
  57. Other Writing Groups in Vermont
  58. Poetry Event Calendar

1.) About the Vermont Poetry Newsletter Network

The Vermont Poetry Newsletter Network is made up of people of all backgrounds, ages and skills who appreciate the craft of poetry and want to promote it in the beautiful state of Vermont. The network consists of a free e-mail list, an eventual web site, workshops, open mics, poetry performances and other literary events. The network provides opportunities to meet local poets, talk about and enjoy poetry, and motivate and inspire yourself in whatever writing projects you are involved.

The mission of the Vermont Poetry Newsletter is to foster the poetry arts community in the Green Mountain State. Its goals are to serve as a resource for and about VT poets; to support the development of individual poets; and to encourage an audience for poetry in Vermont.
Dating from 2009, the Vermont Poetry Newsletters are being archived on a blog maintained by poet Patrick Gillespie at Poemshape.

2.) Dear Friends of Poetry:

I hope you’ve all been able to join a local group of poets, quite possibly finding a group through those listed in this newsletter, and have started workshopping your poems. Outside of reading my poems to people both familiar and unfamiliar with poetry readings, there is no greater personal reward for me.

One of the joys of assembling this newsletter is the discovery of stories from all over the world dealing with poetry. There are always more articles than I need for the newsletter, showing me that poetry is alive and well all over the globe.

As we enter National Poetry Month, be aware that there are more poetry readings than usual all over the state. I hope the Poetry Event Calendar attached to this newsletter is helpful for you to select some quality reads this month. (Can you believe Martin Espada on May 2nd?!) If you want to see the same data but in a “wall calendar” format, then go to http://poetz.com/, select Calendars Galore, then Vermont Poetry Calendar.

We’ve been asked by the Vermont Arts Council to enter the name of a poet for nomination for Vermont’s new Poet Laureate. The deadline for getting your nomination in is Friday, March 25th. See below for instructions.

Ron Lewis
VPN Publisher
(802) 247-5913
vtpoet@gmail.com

3.) WRITING ASSIGNMENT • SUGGESTION EXERCISES

  • OTTER CREEK POETS EXERCISES & ASSIGNMENTS

1) “Pray for the grace of accuracy” – Robert Lowell

Write a poem that begins with exact observation and continues in a rein of accuracy.

2) Write 12 haiku as unlike haiku as you can imagine. Forget everything you know about 5-7-5.

3) “Executive Summary”
Tell the story of your life, so far, in 30 lines or fewer.

4) Choose a Shakespeare sonnet. Steal all 14 rhyme words. Write a new sonnet.

5) Choose an animal species and study it. Write a poem in the animal’s voice.

  • Exercises given by David Weinstock for the Otter Creek Poets.

PREVIOUS WRITING ASSIGNMENT/SUGGESTION/EXERCISE/PROMPT:

See Previous Issue.

Good Luck!

4.) Call for Nominations for the appointment of Vermont’s Next Poet Laureate

DEADLINE: FRIDAY, MARCH 25, 2011

Governor Peter Shumlin and the Vermont Arts Council invite you to submit nominations for the appointment of a new Vermont Poet Laureate.

Criteria

This four-year appointment will be made by the Governor based on the recommendation of a distinguished panel. The panel will make its recommendation based upon how well the nominated poet meets the following criteria:

The Vermont Poet Laureate is a person who is a resident of Vermont; (Vermont being his/her primary residence) whose poetry manifests a high degree of excellence; who has produced a critically acclaimed body of work; who has a long association with Vermont.

The poet being nominated must agree to participate from time to time in official ceremonies and readings at the Vermont State House and other locations.

The poet selected shall receive an honorarium of $1000 provided by the Vermont Arts Council.

Estimated Timeline
Deadline for nominations: March 25, 2011
Nominations Reviewed & Finalists Selected: April 2011
Completed Works of Finalists reviewed: May/June 2011
Recommendation made to Governor: July 2011
Governor’s formal appointment ceremony for new Poet Laureate: August/September 2011

Nominations must be submitted online. The online nomination must include the name and contact information (mailing address, phone number, email) of the nominated poet along with a short explanation of not more than 250 words explaining why the particular poet should receive the appointment. Be sure to reference the name of at least one (preferably 2) published work(s) of the nominated poet including the name of the publisher and date published. Nominations must also include the name and address of the person making the nomination.

Nominations must be submitted through the Council’s online form on or before Friday, March 25, 2011.

Questions?

Questions regarding nominations should be directed to: Michele Bailey, Program Director at 802-828-3294 mbailey@vermontartscouncil.org

§

The online form to submit a nomination can be found here.

Historical List of Vermont Poets Laureate

July 26, 2007-Present: Ruth Stone, Goshen (b. June 8, 1915)
March 5, 2003 – July 25, 2007: Grace Paley, Thetford (b. December 11, 1922, d. August 22, 2007 of breast cancer)
1999-2002: Ellen Bryant Voigt, Cabot (b. May 9, 1943)
1994-1998: Louise Glück, Cambridge, MA (b. April 22, 1943)
1989-1993: Galway Kinnell, Sheffield (b. February 1, 1927)
July 22, 1961-1963: Robert Frost, Ripton (b. March 26, 1874, d. January 29, 1963 of pulmonary embolism)

Position History:
 According to a February 7, 2003 press release from the Vermont Arts Council, “Robert Frost was declared Poet Laureate in 1961 [upon the adoption of Joint House Resolution 54 by the General Assembly]. In 1988 Governor Kunin re-established the position. (Reference: Executive Order No 69, 1988) Galway Kinnell was the first State Poet named for a term of 4 years as a result of this order in 1989.” The Arts Council further notes that “at the direction of the Governor [it] conducts the selection process for the State Poet by convening an advisory/selection panel. The Vermont State Poet is a person whose primary residence is in Vermont; whose poetry manifests a high degree of excellence; who has produced a critically acclaimed body of work; and who has a long association with Vermont.”

  • I am going to be on the advisory/selection panel that reviews all the suggestions and makes a final recommendation to the Governor for Vermont’s next Poet Laureate. Ron Lewis

5.)

Here you have a photo of President Obama and National Medal of the Arts recipient and NH poet Donald Hall, who is not, in fact, a yeti, although from this photo, it may be hard to tell.

6.) World Poetry Day — 21 March

How Do I Love Thee? Count 140 Characters
By RANDY KENNEDY
Published: March 19, 2011

As literary coincidences go, it might not carry quite the same cosmic portent as Halley’s Comet appearing in the month of Mark Twain’s birth. But Monday happens to be both World Poetry Day and the fifth anniversary of the moment when a young American software designer named Jack Dorsey sent out to the world the first message using the service that soon became known as Twitter.

The ambrosial stuff of poesy it was not, except maybe to Dilbert fans: “inviting coworkers.” (….)

7.)

Poets convey a timeless message. They are often key witness to history’s great political and social changes. Their writings inspire us to build lasting peace in our minds, to rethink relations between man and nature and to establish humanism founded on the uniqueness and diversity of peoples. This is a difficult task, requiring the participation of all, whether in schools, libraries or cultural institutions. To quote the poet Tagore, the 150th anniversary of whose birth will be celebrated this year, “I have spent my days in stringing and unstringing my instrument.” (….)

8.)

A POET’S IMPLUVIUM
TriQuarterly Online
by Karen Zemanick on Mar 20, 2011

Today is World Poetry Day. On the Poetry Foundation’s website, a poetry novice describes her self-guided instruction in the genre. Memoirist Emily Gould read a random poem from the website each day for a month, then picked four favorites and read the books in which they were originally published. She writes:

It turns out that unless you make a concerted effort in the direction of reading poetry, poetry doesn’t just traipse into your mind by chance. You have to seek poetry out and, at least at first, you have force yourself to swallow it. Like a scratchy vitamin . . . . A poem requires full attention in a way that prose does not, and worse, a poem is much harder to like because every word matters. In a 5,000-word story or article, a reader will forgive or just not notice an off metaphor, unfunny joke, or annoying word. (….)

9.) Mining the Peaks and Digging the Slopes: 
the Mountainous State of American Poetry

“I think that what poets do is decipher silence.” — Ekiwah Adler Beléndez

I. Poetry: The Opposite of Silence?

In 1952, the experimental American musician John Cage produced the achievement for which he remains most famous: the composition 4′33″, an entire performance in which not a single note was played. This was, in short, a piece which compelled the audience to focus on their internal and surrounding environments — all the small noises of the audience, the silences, the fidgeting, the murmuring and talking, their own reactions and anxieties – rather than any sounds or actions emanating from the stage. That was the performance: all four minutes and thirty-three seconds of it. (….)

10.) The 2011 Chapbook Festival

If you were to envision the chapbook as star system, it might look a little something like this poster I dug out of a box of unwanted books and ephemera. Maybe not, but lets go with this for a second because this image is rad! Identities swirl around an androgynous central figure representing the sun. The sun is a stand-in for YOU. You are a reader of chapbooks! You try to make sense of everything with symbols. Get a haircut. Borrow some dark matter shears.

Ok Ok, the universe of the chapbook is hardly a heliocentric thing. But publishers of chapbooks are part of a larger (still smallish) community of makers interested in reaching out to a variety of specific readerships. Form and method vary greatly among them. What has been consistent is usually a limited page count and print run—anywhere from 1000 to a handful—a localized sphere of distribution, and an emphasis on the aesthetic and personal rather than the commercial value of products. (….)

11.) Fashion Extremes: Celebrate Your Unique Style
Spring Fashion Modeled by Rising Young Poets

Modeling the latest looks, eight rising poets express their dynamic personal styles—and show you how to cultivate your own.

The Look: Hemlines Go Long

Suheir Hammad, 37 

The author of Breaking Poems, and an original cast member of Russell Simmons Presents Def Poetry Jam on Broadway, Hammad writes about “how people maintain their humanity in difficult circumstances.” She likes her clothes to tell a story, too: “I don’t always look the way people expect a poet to look. Onstage, you’ll find me in sequins.” For spring, a to-the-ankle skirt and sweeping chiffon duster make for a dramatic entrance. “Materials and shape interest me,” Hammad says. “There are no rules—just, ‘How am I going to make this work?’” (….)

12.) Akilah Oliver (1961-2011)

We have just learned that our beloved friend, poet, teacher, performer, activist, mother, sister, Akilah Oliver passed away in her home in the Fort Greene section of Brooklyn, N.Y.

Akilah Oliver was born in 1961 in St. Louis and grew up in Los Angeles. In the 1990’s she founded and performed with the feminist performance collective Sacred Naked Nature Girls. For several years, Akilah lived in Boulder, Colorado, where she raised her son Oluchi McDonald (1982-2003) and was a teacher, activist and beloved member of the community at Naropa University’s Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Recently, in New York City, Akilah taught poetry and writing at The New School, Pratt Insitute and The Poetry Project, where she also served as Monday Night Readings Coordinator in 07-08. She was a PhD candidate at The European Graduate School and a member of the Belladonna* Collaborative. (click on image to read more….)

13.)

James Franco Talks Poetry
How the actor, director, Oscar host, performance artist, and PhD candidate became America’s most famous poetry geek.

JAMES FRANCO INTERVIEWED BY TRAVIS NICHOLS

A few days after the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced Franco would be hosting this Sunday’s Oscars, he took time out of his (insane) schedule to talk on the phone with us about his upcoming biopic of Hart Crane, the cinematic lyric, and how he came to love poetry.

§

Travis Nichols: You seem to read poetry that has a little more crunch to it than your standard “refrigerator door” poetry. I was wondering when you were able to make that leap—from historical, dorm room poetry like Neruda and Ginsberg to contemporary poets like Frank Bidart and Spencer Reece. Did you make the leap on your own?

James Franco: I came across Ginsberg and the Beats when I was in high school. And then I suppose my first intro to what I guess you’d call the opposite pole of the poetry world at the time—Lowell and Bishop and, in that tradition, Anthony Hecht—was when I went back to UCLA. I had a teacher named Jonathan Post who had been a student of Hecht, and so he taught a class that covered American poetry up until the ’60s or ’70s. But it really wasn’t until I went to Warren Wilson that I was exposed to contemporary poetry in a real expansive or in-depth way. (….)

14.) Join me on a walk to the recycling bin

I forget how I first met James Copeland. But the first I heard of him, or heard anything by him was a poetry/music event for the poetry collective, Ugly Duckling. in March of 2009. It was his first poetry reading, and by some strange cosmic coincidence, Holy Spirits’ first show. There were four poets reading that night, all well in their own right, but James’ reading stuck with me. Here was a man dressed in soft, forlorn clerk attire, with a relaxed book-on-tape voice reading work with memorable lines like “Danger spelled backwards doesn’t spell Undanger // that’s just not the way things operate // in this version of time”, and “somehow the moon looks just like a nostril.” (click on image to read more…)

15.)

Interview With Sam Hamill on Translating Poetry
by Grant of Poet Core

Once a month I meet with a group of other poets at a local restaurant to talk about poetry and to workshop some poems. At a recent meeting we were looking over translations of Japanese poems by Sam Hamill, and we began discussing the subject of translations and the challenges they create for the translator and the reader.

To help answer a few of the questions, I decided to go to the source himself.

Hamill has published at least 14 volumes of his own poetry and about two dozen collections of translations from Chinese, Japanese, ancient Greek and Latin and more. He co-founded Copper Canyon Press and created Poets Against War. (click on image to read more….)

16.)

The Poetry of Catastrophe
By SAM TANENHAUS

Even devoted followers of the news seem overwhelmed by the sheer volume of horrific events unfolding just now — in particular the continuing bloodshed in the Arab world and the ever-worsening story of the earthquake-tsunami-nuclear crisis in Japan. These headlines recall the most frightening chapters of antiquity, times of pestilence and war, a steady mood of darkening apocalypse.

Reports From the World of Books

To a great extent, literature has provided us with the imagery and vocabulary of disaster: whether the Bible, with its plagues and floods, its terrible judgments (“Ah sinful nation, a people laden with iniquity, a seed of evildoers, children that are corrupters”); or Greek tragedy, with its blood-crimes and murderous revenges.

What follows is a sampler of literary catastrophe. Don’t run away. It’s not as depressing as it sounds. One of the enduring paradoxes of great apocalyptic writing is that it consoles even as it alarms. (….)


17.)

  • Happy Patty’s Day, Greg Delanty! (Greg happens to be mentioned in this article.) ~ Ron L.

‘What daffodils were to Wordsworth, drains and backstreet pubs are to me’

ONE OF THE oldest and most argued-over maxims in literature is to write only about what you know. It raises the question of what happens when writers – in this instance poets – move to other countries and so encounter different places, cultures and sets of experiences? Do these new points of reference, both emotional and physical, influence their work? Or is the journey that really matters to poets the one they conduct in their heads, regardless of location or environment?
In his review of The View from Here , the most recent collection of Sara Berkeley, who lives and works in rural California, the critic Philip Coleman referred to a “contemporary Irish poetic diaspora”. And it is striking how many Irish poets now live off the island. (….)

18.)

Say it ain’t so! Is this what our books have to look forward to?

19.)

The Lighter Side: Five Lessons from AWP (Or, Why We Hate Poetry Readings)
From Contemporary Poetry Review

Five Lessons from AWP: Or, Why We Hate Poetry Readings

1) You should recite your poetry, not read it.

2) If you can’t recite your poetry, then you can’t remember your poetry. And if you can’t remember your poetry, why would anyone else?

3) A poetry recital should be a performance ( …)

20.) CHAPBOOK ARCHIVE

Ugly Ducking Presse

UDP’S Online Chapbook Archive allows out-of-print chapbooks to be read online. All of the below titles can be viewed in full—just click on the image—and many have additional content specially for the online edition. This is a work in progress, so check back soon for more titles from the backlist. UDP also has a series of Original Web Books.

21.)

“I count it as one of the great moments of my life when I first realized I
could walk out of a theatre.” —Philip Larkin

I keep that Larkin quote in mind whenever I go to a live performance. There is little obliging me to stay in my seat except for my engagement with the performance, but out of courtesy I will mosttimes sit on the aisle toward the back and wait for thunderous applause to mask my leaving. Poetry readings are espeially awkward, since it doesn’t matter much where I sit, a missing body will be noticed, and there is more often than not, a dearth of thunder.
The manifesto above says that it is the “lighter side,” but I think it is meant to be taken seriously. Why not recite your own poetry? Or if not, at least have a set list with notes of what you want to say between each poem, instead of the dreary chitchat that wanders until the poem is explained away before it is read. Even poetry that is not performance poetry should be a performance. It’s about the audience not the poet. (….)

22.)

Hi writers–

Clara Rose is young, a lot of fun, totally brilliant, and starting this really cool new reading series – Alice B. Fogel

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Contact:

Clara Rose Thornton: 802.275.7799 ~ clara@inkblotcomplex.com
The Starving Artist: 603.352.6900 ~ thestarvingartist@mindspring.com
Project Space 9/RAMP: 802.463.3252 ~ bf3rdfriday@gmail.com

Dates:

BELLOWS FALLS, Vt. KEENE, N.H.

March 18, 2011 ~ 6-8 p.m. March 19, 2011 ~ 6-8 p.m.
April 15, 2011 ~ 6-8 p.m. April 16, 2011 ~ 6-8 p.m.
May 20, 2011 ~ 6-8 p.m. May 21, 2011 ~ 6-8 p.m.
June 17, 2011 ~ 6-8 p.m. … June 18, 2011 ~ 6-8 p.m. …

VICE & VERSES

Brought to you by

This month, and continuing every third weekend that the masses have minds to perceive the world and words to share, comes VICE AND VERSES, a unique poetry open mic hosted by Chicago-born poet and arts critic Clara Rose Thornton. VICE AND VERSES takes its cue from Thornton’s popular and innovative InkBlot Complex Poetry Workshop, and adds the energy and bravado of a raucous concert in some dingy underground club, all glory intact. In addition to highlighting community voices, there will be occasional featured readers from around the country. Bring your shouts and hollers.

VICE AND VERSES occurs every third Friday and Saturday. Begins on Friday, March 18 in downtown Bellows Falls, Vt., at the RAMP Gallery, Project Space 9 at 9 Canal Street; and on Saturday, March 19 in downtown Keene, N.H., at The Starving Artist, 10 West Street.

* 6-8 p.m., $3-5 suggested donation, BYOB, no sign-up necessary, all insanities welcome *

WWW.CLARAROSETHORNTON.COM
WWW.THESTARVINGARTISTCOLLECTIVE.COM
WWW.RAMP-VT.ORG

23.)
Reid: Save federal funding for the cowboy poets!
File this under: Did Harry Reid just say that?

In the middle of his tirade against House Republicans’ “mean-spirited” budget bill on the Senate floor Tuesday, the Senate Majority Leader lamented that the GOP’s proposed budget cuts would eliminate the annual “cowboy poetry festival” in his home state of Nevada. (See also: Reid’s prostitution lecture bombs.) 

Reid clearly has a soft spot for the Baxter Blacks of the poetry world and thinks Republicans don’t. (….)

24.)

Book Review:

The Age of Auden
By Aidan Wasley 
Princeton, 258 pages, $35
Keeper of the Affirming Flame
By BRAD LEITHAUSER

The English poet W.H. Auden arrived in New York in January 1939. He was 32 and internationally famous. America was all but unknown to him, yet he took to it eagerly and steadfastly, becoming a U.S. citizen in 1946. Though he would always travel widely, New York remained his base until shortly before his death, in 1973. America had a transforming influence on Auden’s poetry, and he—in his role as teacher, essayist and leader of an informal, brilliant, drifting, often boozy literary salon—had a transforming effect on American poetry. The interlocking ways in which a vast country shaped an individual poet, even as he shaped its contentious, loosely confederated poets, is the subject of Aidan Wasley’s “The Age of Auden.”

At the time of his New York arrival, Auden was widely seen—and widely resented for being seen—as the heir apparent to T.S. Eliot. Auden was going to extend the Modernist revolution. It turned out that Eliot’s clipped, apocalyptic dispatches from the Waste Land, his haunting ruminations from the end of the world, hardly marked the end of poetry. Suddenly, Auden had emerged, with all his robust erudition, his unimpeachable command of poetic forms, his eclectic subject matter, his disarming willingness to risk silliness in pursuit of drollery. (click on image to read more….)

25.)

  • We’ll be unable to go to this reading, but I thought this article both timely and inspirational. – Ron L.

Japanese-American internment topic when Seattle poet reads in Port Angeles

By Diane Urbani de la Paz
Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Poet Tess Gallagher found a manuscript on her friend Alfredo Arreguin’s dining-room table — he wanted her to take just a quick look — and “two hours later, I was still reading,” she recalls.

“Alfredo said, ‘You didn’t have to do that,’ and I said, ‘Oh, yes, I did,’” Gallagher added.

In her hands was poet Lawrence Matsuda’s A Cold Wind from Idaho, an array of poems Gallagher calls both challenging and inspirational.

Matsuda, who lives in Seattle, will read from the slim volume at 12:35 p.m. Tuesday in the Little Theater at Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd. Admission is free to the public, and copies of Wind will be available.

‘Alchemy of the soul’

Gallagher, the renowned poet, teacher and daughter of Port Angeles, will be there, too, to witness something she describes as “an alchemy of the soul.” (….)

26.)

The 10 best American poems
By Jay Parini

The list could go on and on, but these are the poems that seem to me to have left the deepest mark on US literature – and me

For whatever reason, I woke up today with a list of the 10 greatest American poems in my head that had been accumulating through the night. Every list is subjective, and of course the use of “greatest” even more so – but these are not just “favorite” poems. I’ve been thinking about American poetry – and teaching it to university students – for nearly 40 years, and these are the 10 poems that, in my own reading life, have seemed the most durable; poems that shifted the course of poetry in the United States, as well as poems that I look forward to teaching every year because they represent something indelible. The list could go on and on, of course. I deeply regret leaving off Roethke’s “The Lost Son”, Adrienne Rich’s “Diving into the Wreck” and “The Asphodel, that Greeny Flower” by William Carlos Williams. But I guess I just sneaked them onto the list, didn’t I? (….)

27.)

Exhibition note
by David Yezzi

On “The Alice Methfessel Collection of Paintings by Elizabeth Bishop” at James S. Jaffe Rare Books, New York.

While it is now well known that Elizabeth Bishop (1911–79) was a gifted amateur painter as well as a poet, her lyrical watercolors (reminiscent of Charles E. Burchfield and Jane Freilicher) remained something of a secret during her lifetime and even for many years after her death. When plans were hatched in the early 1990s for a seminar on Bishop’s work in Key West (where Bishop lived for a decade beginning in 1938), the poet William Benton inquired whether her paintings would be shown as well. No one knew what he was talking about. In fact, Benton himself hardly knew Bishop’s artwork, but he had been struck by her paintings that had recently appeared on the dust jackets for her collected poems and prose—Mérida from the Roof and Tombstones for Sale. (Another watercolor, of flowers, from the collection of the artist Loren MacIver, is reproduced on the jacket for One Art, the edition of Bishop’s letters that appeared in 1994.) (….)

The paintings can be viewed here.

28.)

Have some extra cash in your pocket? Take a look at this baby for sale, Sylvia Plath’s The Colossus and other poems.”

29.)

Adrienne Rich on ‘Tonight No Poetry Will Serve”
by Kate Waldman

Adrienne Rich needs no introduction. One of the twentieth century’s most exhaustively celebrated poets and essayists, she counts among her many honors a National Book Award, a Book Critics Circle Award, and the Lannan Lifetime Achievement Award. Robert Hass has ascribed to her work the qualities of salt and darkness, praising its “relentless need to confront difficulty.” But Rich’s latest collection, Tonight No Poetry Will Serve, ranges from dismay to joy, the outraged to the erotic. Over e-mail, Rich shared her thoughts on poetry and power, the search for a more nuanced wartime aesthetic, and the meaning of the “woman citizen.”

Let’s start with the title, Tonight No Poetry Will Serve. (….)

30.)

On Reviewing: David Orr
By Lemon Hound

LH: What do you think the purpose of a review is? If you also write about books on a blog, why? What does blogging let you do differently?

DO: A good review is a persuasive judgment entertainingly delivered. Criticism itself is a broader category, and includes exploratory essays, polemics, advocacy, whither-the-poets-of-yesteryears and so forth. Poetry has plenty of critics, but fewer reviewers than it probably deserves.

LH: If you write reviews, how would you describe your approach, or method? Do you offer or engage in exegesis, theoretical, academic, reader response, close, contextual or evaluative readings? If you don’t write but read reviews, what aspects of reviewing do you notice?

DO: My method is coffee in the morning, liquor at night. If a piece is going badly, this procedure may be reversed. (click on image to read more….)

31.)

Basic bard: Kooser’s accessible poetry maddens some, delights others
By Clay Evans

For an insurance underwriter, Ted Kooser makes a pretty good poet.

“I knew very early that I would never be able to make a living as a poet,” says Kooser, talking on a cell phone from a highway shoulder somewhere in the middle of Missouri. “If I wanted to support my family, I knew I’d have to have a regular day job.”

So, for 40 years Kooser, who served as Poet Laureate of the United States from 2004-2006, rose in the pre-dawn hours to write poetry before heading to an office in Lincoln, Neb., where he spent eight hours evaluating applications of people who wanted to buy insurance. (….)

32.)

In the Company of Amy Clampitt
By POLLY ROSENWAIKE

Two years ago I spent some time in Lenox, Massachusetts, at a house once owned by the poet Amy Clampitt. I slept in her bed, rifled through her books, gazed out the kitchen window at the tree by which her ashes are buried. Since 2001, the house has served as a residency for poets; as the ninth Amy Clampitt Resident Fellow, my boyfriend was awarded a six-month stay. On a January weekend I helped him move into the grey clapboard house with blue-green shutters. Just down the road, The Mount, the mansion built by Edith Wharton, stood in baronial splendor. Everything about the more intimate Clampitt house struck me as perfect: the cozy living room with its comfy upholstered chairs; the loft bedroom and writing nook overlooking the snowy street; the spare bedroom crammed with boxes of Clampitt’s manuscripts, correspondence, and photographs. We found a bin stacked with copies of Clampitt’s own books of poetry, and my boyfriend noted how cool it would be to read Amy Clampitt’s The Kingfisher.

I reluctantly caught the bus back to New York, where I had an M.F.A. thesis to write. This meant churning out and polishing short stories, and also producing a critical essay. I decided to write about Clampitt. Now I had an excuse for riding the Greyhound to Lenox as often as possible: I had research to do. But I immediately ran into trouble. I wanted to write about both Clampitt’s poetry and her house, but what was the connection between the two?  (click on image to read more….)

33.) Book Review:

THE ECCO ANTHOLOGY OF INTERNATIONAL POETRY
EDITED BY ILYA KAMINSKY AND SUSAN HARRIS.
ECCO PRESS. 592 PP., $19.99.

WHERE IT IS TO BE HUMAN

“We love life if we find a way to it,” writes Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish in his poem, “And We Love Life”: “And we plant, where we settle, some fast growing plants, and harvest / the dead.”
Finding a way to it: a metaphor for the nationless, like Darwish, for all humankind struggling for a sense of place, or meaning, or community, or language—a metaphor for the writer and the reader as well. Indeed, this question of where we find ourselves is quite possibly the question of our current moment.

The Ecco Anthology of International Poetry ponders this question deeply. The poems included here are poems of translation and journey, of solitude and togetherness, of rage and fear and joy and humor. They are poems that inhabit what it is to be human. And, appropriately, they are poems that inhabit where it is to be human. (click on image to read more….)

34.)
Double Shadow: Poems by Carl Phillips

In Phillips’ delicately beautiful but highly unstable universe, both self and world are the sort of things that seem to fail.

By Troy Jollimore
Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 58 pages, $23.00

“We’re not what / either of us expected, / are we?” Carl Phillips asks in his new book, Double Shadow. It’s a good question, and it’s one that raises another question, not only in this particular poem but through much of the book: whom, precisely, is the speaker addressing? The reader, perhaps – in which case we feel, or ought to feel, implicated and challenged. Or, quite plausibly, the question is directed toward a friend or lover, or a parent or child. But the thought also crosses one’s mind – it’s bound to – that it is the world itself that is here being both addressed and accused. It is often claimed, after all, that a lyric poem is a record of an encounter between the self and the world. And in Phillips’ delicately beautiful but highly unstable universe, both self and world are the sort of things that seem to fail, more often than not, to behave as one might have expected. (click on image to read more….)

35.) No money in poetry?

Chase Twichell Wins Kingsley Tufts Award

Chase Twichell has received the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award of $100,000 for her book Horses Where the Answers Should Have Been. The Kingsley Tufts prize was established in 1992 to honor work by a mid career poet; it is the world’s largest monetary prize for a single collection of poetry.

36.)

In the days following the Three Mile Island accident in 1979,
I wrote the following poem. It seems relevant again.

 

LITANY FOR TODAY
A Response to the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant Accident

From Three Mile Island, from Vermont Yankee, from Seabrook,
from a hundred other places in the country
a cloud of fear has risen, floated, into our lives
and no commission or committee, no panel of experts,
no congressman or senator (….)

37.)

31 Books in 31 Days: Stephen Burt on Clare Cavanagh’s “Lyric Poetry and Modern Politics”
by stephen burt | Feb-08-2011

Each day leading up to the March 10 announcement of the 2010 NBCC award winners, Critical Mass highlights one of the thirty-one finalists (to read other entries in the series, click here). Today, NBCC board member Stephen Burt discusses criticism finalist Clare Cavanagh’s Lyric Poetry and Modern Politics: Russia, Poland, and the West (Yale University Press).
Don’t let Clare Cavanagh’s scholarly gravity scare you: erudite but always clear, aware of detail but never overwhelmed by it, this big book tells a dramatic story about a hundred years of poems in three languages, a story of revolutions, repressions, inventions, and mistakes, not least a big mistake in the way that we Americans have admired Russian and Polish poems. Often we have viewed the poets as martyrs, their writing and nonwriting lives spent resisting regimes, making their hard lives into symbols. Cavanagh thinks we should stop, and look at the poems. (click on image to read more….)

38.) Woodberry Poetry Room Collection

Welcome to the Woodberry Poetry Room, home to an unparalleled collection of 20th and 21st century English-language poetry books and serials, audio recordings, and rare materials. Founded in 1931, in honor of Harvard alumnus, poet and scholar George Edward Woodberry (1855-1930), the Poetry Room offers students, faculty, scholars and members of the public a comprehensive experience of the art-form: from written text, to audio and visual recordings, to live readings and events. (….)

39.)

For you teachers, here is a very valuable resource, the 1998 Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival Teacher’s Guide, Fooling With Words.

40.)

“Great Poetry Links”
Badilisha Poetry Radio

Badilisha Poetry Radio uniquely focuses on podcasts by poets from the African Continent and its Diaspora. This online platform creates a dynamic space in which to appreciate, celebrate and discover contemporary Pan-African poetry. The weekly podcasts feature a vast spectrum of voices across poetic genres.

Badilisha Poetry’s podcasts are presented by a range of presenters, which have included to-date Malika Ndlovu, Mbali Vilakazi and Khadija Heeger.

The podcasts can be listened to via live stream on individual podcast pages, downloaded or listened to on iTunes. If you like what you hear, visit our Artists database or click on the individual poet’s links to find out more about their work. All Pan-African poets are welcome to submit their work here.

Badilisha Poetry Radio is the only poetry podcast platform exclusively dedicated to the voices of Africa and its Diaspora.

Each week, we present a range of extraordinary new voices and poetic genres. Our intention is to platform who and what Africa has to say to itself and the rest of the world.

41.)

“You owe reality nothing and the truth about your feelings everything.

Poetry Quote by Richard Hugo

42.)

linebreak

  • Linebreak is an online journal with a bias for good poetry. Here is a poem from their web site this week:

Virginity
by Katrina Vandenberg

I knew it made me prized, helpless; that losing it
would make me bleed. Because the desires of boys
angered my father, so did I — though desire

seemed unconnected to the way they would, in a pack,
stand in a driveway and call out invitations.

If I could pass and seem unshaken,
they would shout at my back, You bitch! (….)

43.)
American Life in Poetry: Column 301
BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE, 2004-2006

Some of us are fortunate to find companions among the other creatures, and in this poem by T. Alan Broughton of Vermont, we sense a kind of friendship without dependency between our species and another.

Great Blue Heron

I drive past him each day in the swamp where he stands
on one leg, hunched as if dreaming of his own form
the surface reflects. Often I nearly forget to turn left,
buy fish and wine, be home in time to cook and chill.
Today the bird stays with me, as if I am moving through (….)
American Life in Poetry: Column 302
BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE, 2004-2006

In Iowa in the 1950’s, when we at last heard about pizza, my mother decided to make one for us. She rolled out bread dough, put catsup on it, and baked it. Voila! Pizza! And inexpensive, too. Here’s Grace Cavalieri, a poet and playwright who lives in Maryland, serving something similar and undoubtedly better.

Tomato Pies, 25 Cents

Tomato pies are what we called them, those days,
before Pizza came in,
at my Grandmother’s restaurant,
in Trenton New Jersey.
My grandfather is rolling meatballs (….)
American Life in Poetry: Column 303
BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE, 2004-2006

There’s something wonderfully sweet about a wife cutting a husband’s hair, and Bruce Guernsey, who lives in Illinois and Maine, captures it beautifully in this poem.

For My Wife Cutting My Hair

You move around me expertly like the good, round
Italian barber I went to in Florence,
years before we met, his scissors
a razor he sharpened on a belt.  (….)

American Life in Poetry: Column 304
BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE, 2004-2006

After my mother died, one of the most difficult tasks for my sister and me was to take the clothes she’d made for herself to a thrift shop. In this poem, Frannie Lindsay, a Massachusetts poet, remembers a similar experience.

The Thrift Shop Dresses

I slid the white louvers shut so I could stand in your closet
a little while among the throng of flowered dresses
you hadn’t worn in years, and touch the creases
on each of their sleeves that smelled of forgiveness
and even though you would still be alive a few more days (….)
American Life in Poetry: Column 305
BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE, 2004-2006

The great Spanish artist Pablo Picasso said that, in his subjects, he kept the joy of discovery, the pleasure of the unexpected. In this poem celebrating Picasso, Tim Nolan, an attorney in Minneapolis, says the world will disclose such pleasures to us, too, if only we pay close attention.

Picasso

How can we believe he did it—
every day—for all those years?

We remember how the musicians
gathered for him—and the prostitutes (….)

44.)

Poets Laureate of the U.S.A.

A Net-annotated list of all the poets who have served the Library of Congress as Consultant (the old title) or Poet Laureate Consultant (the new title). Biographies & general reference sites are linked to the poets’ names — for the recent Laureates these are our own poet profiles with book-buying links at the bottom. Many of the other linked biographies are pages from the Academy of American Poets’ Find a Poet archive, a growing & invaluable resource. If there is no general information site about the poet, we have searched the Net for sample poems or other writings or recordings & listed those below the poet’s name.

Joseph Auslander 1937-41
Allen Tate 1943-44
Robert Penn Warren 1944-45
Louise Bogan 1945-46
Karl Shapiro 1946-47
Robert Lowell 1947-48
Leonie Adams 1948-49
Elizabeth Bishop 1949-50
Conrad Aiken 1950-52 (First to serve two terms)
William Carlos WilliamsAppointed to serve two terms in 1952 but did not serve — for more on this & other Laureate controversies see the history in Jacket magazine.
Randall Jarrell 1957-58
Robert Frost 1958-59
Richard Eberhart 1959-61
Louis Untermeyer 1961-63
Howard Nemerov 1963-64
Reed Whittemore 1964-65
Stephen Spender 1965-66
James Dickey 1966-68
William Jay Smith 1968-70
William Stafford 1970-71
Josephine Jacobsen 1971-73
Daniel Hoffman 1973-74
Stanley Kunitz 1974-76
Robert Hayden 1976-78
William Meredith 1978-80
Maxine Kumin 1981-82
Anthony Hecht 1982-84
Robert Fitzgerald 1984-85 Appointed and served in a health-limited capacity, but did not come to the Library of Congress
Reed Whittemore 1984-85 Interim Consultant in Poetry
Gwendolyn Brooks 1985-86
Robert Penn Warren 1986-87 First to be designated Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry
Richard Wilbur 1987-88
Howard Nemerov 1988-90
Mark Strand 1990-91
Joseph Brodsky 1991-92
Mona Van Duyn 1992-93
Rita Dove 1993-95
Robert Hass 1995-97
Robert Pinsky 1997-2000
Stanley Kunitz 2000-2001
Billy Collins 2001-2003
Louise Glück 2003-2004
Ted Kooser 2004-2006
Donald Hall 2006-2007
Charles Simic 2007-2008
Kay Ryan 2008-2010
M.S. Merwin 2010-Present

45.)

Historical List of Vermont Poets Laureate

July 26, 2007-Present: Ruth Stone, Goshen (b. June 8, 1915)
March 5, 2003 – July 25, 2007: Grace Paley, Thetford (b. December 11, 1922, d. August 22, 2007 of breast cancer)
1999-2002: Ellen Bryant Voigt, Cabot (b. May 9, 1943)
1994-1998: Louise Glück, Cambridge, MA (b. April 22, 1943)
1989-1993: Galway Kinnell, Sheffield (b. February 1, 1927)
July 22, 1961-1963: Robert Frost, Ripton (b. March 26, 1874, d. January 29, 1963 of pulmonary embolism)

Position History:
 According to a February 7, 2003 press release from the Vermont Arts Council, “Robert Frost was declared Poet Laureate in 1961 [upon the adoption of Joint House Resolution 54 by the General Assembly]. In 1988 Governor Kunin re-established the position. (Reference: Executive Order No 69, 1988) Galway Kinnell was the first State Poet named for a term of 4 years as a result of this order in 1989.” The Arts Council further notes that “at the direction of the Governor [it] conducts the selection process for the State Poet by convening an advisory/selection panel. The Vermont State Poet is a person whose primary residence is in Vermont; whose poetry manifests a high degree of excellence; who has produced a critically acclaimed body of work; and who has a long association with Vermont.”

46.)

Historical list of United States Poets Laureate from Vermont

1958-1959: Robert Frost, Ripton (b. March 26, 1874, d. January 29, 1963 of pulmonary embolism)
August, 2003-2004: Louise Glück, Cambridge, MA (b. April 22, 1943)

47.)

Historical List of New Hampshire Poets Laureate

March 2004 – Present: Charles E. Butts
January 2006 – March 2009: Patricia Fargnoli
March 2004 – December 2005: Cynthia Huntington
October, 1999 – March 2004: Marie Harris, Barrington
December 1995 – March 1999: Donald Hall, Wilmot
January 1995 – March 1999: Jane Kenyon, Wilmot
March 1989 – March 1994: Maxine Kumin, Warner
June, 1984 – January 1989: Donald Hall, Danbury
January 1979 – January 1984: Richard G. Eberhart, Hanover
August 1972 – December 1978: Eleanor Vinton, Concord
September 1968 – July 1972: Paul Scott Mowrer

48.)

Historical list of United States Poets Laureate from New Hampshire

2007-2008: Charles Simic, Strafford
2006-2007: Donald Hall, Wilmot
1981-1982: Maxine Kumin, Warner
1959-1961: Richard Eberhart
1958-1959: Robert Frost, Derry

49.) If you ever have a need to contact me, here’s how to go about doing so:

Ronald Lewis:
Phone: 802-247-5913
Cell: 802-779-5913
Home: 1211 Forest Dale Road, Brandon, VT 05733
Email: vtpoet@gmail.com

50.) VERMONT LITERARY JOURNALS

1) The Queen City Review

The QCR is also on FacebookBurlington College’s  The Queen City Review is a yearly journal of art and literature and accepts the work of new and established writers and artists in the areas of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, memoir, photography, and fine art, as well as essays and criticism on all aspects of the aforementioned. They seek to publish high quality work that ranges 3) broadly in topic and genre.

The Queen City Review can be purchased by 2-year subscription or individually. The price of one issue is $8 plus shipping charges ($1) for a total of $9. Subscriptions can be purchased for $14 plus shipping charges ($2) and includes the Fall 2010 and upcoming 2011 issues. Copies can also be purchased in the Writing Center or at the front desk. They accept cash, check, and credit cards (Visa and Mastercard). You can mail your payment to them or by calling (802) 862-9616 ext. 234 to place your order over the phone. If mailing your payment, mail details to:

ATTN: Heidi Berkowitz Sadler
Faculty, Interdisciplinary Studies
Coordinator, The Writing Center
Editor, The Queen City Review
Burlington College
95 North Avenue
Burlington, VT 05401

If you have any further questions, you can contact Heidi at:
T: 802-862-9616
E: hsadler@burlington.edu

2) Bloodroot

Bloodroot is a nonprofit literary magazine dedicated to publishing diverse voices through the adventure of poetry, short fiction, and creative nonfiction. Their aim is to provide a platform for the free-spirited emerging and established writer.

The price of a single issue is $8.

Editor, “Do” Roberts
Bloodroot Literary Magazine
PO Box 322
Thetford Center, VT 05075
(802) 785-4916
email: bloodroot@wildblue.net

3) New England Review

A publication of Middlebury College, a high quality literary magazine that continues to uphold its reputation for publishing extraordinary, enduring work.  NER has been publishing now for over 30 years.

Cost: $10 for a single current issue
$30 for a single year (4 issues)
$50 for two years (8 issues)

New England Review
Attn: Orders
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753

Email: NEReview@middlebury.edu
(800) 450-95714) Willard & Maple

A Literary and Fine Art Magazine of Champlain College, Burlington.

Willard & Maple
163 South Willard Street
Freeman 302, Box 34
Burlington, VT 05401

email: willardandmaple@champlain.edu

5) Vermont Literary Review

A Literary and Fine Art Magazine of Castleton State College, Castleton.

The first issue of Vermont Literary Review was published in 1994. The review is published once a year. Work featured in the review includes poetry, fiction, drama, and personal essays from and about New England.

From its inception until 2006, students and professors reviewed the work submitted and selected work to be published. They used to jointly edit and design the review as well. After a brief lapse, the Vermont Literary Review has resumed publication in 2008 as a journal edited and designed solely by English Department faculty. The Literary Club, which used to help create this journal, is now putting out a publication of student work. (….)

6) Green Mountains Review


A Literary and Fine Art Magazine of Johnson State College, Johnson; in publication since 1987.  One of two literary journals published by the college, the other being The Gihon River Review (below).

The Green Mountains Review is an international journal publishing poems, stories, and creative nonfiction by both well-known authors and promising newcomers.  The magazine also features interviews, literary criticism, and book reviews.  Neil Shepard is the general editor and poetry editor of the Green Mountains Review.  The fiction editor is Leslie Daniels.

The editors are open to a wide range of styles and subject matter. If you would like to acquaint yourself with some of the work that we have accepted in the past, then we encourage you to order some of our back issues (….)

7) The Gihon River Review

“The name of the second river is Gihon. No sooner has it come out of Paradise than it vanishes beneath the depths of the sea . . .” -Moses Bar Cepha

The Gihon River Review, published biannually, was founded in the fall of 2001 as a production of the BFA program at Johnson State College. Issues are $5 each. Submissions in poetry, fiction, and nonfiction are read from September to May. Poetry submissions may not exceed five poems; fiction and nonfiction may not exceed twenty-five pages. Send all correspondence to The Gihon River Review, Johnson State College, Johnson, Vermont 05656. Please enclose a SASE. For further info by email, grr@jsc.vsc.edu.

8) Burlington Poetry Journal

The Burlington Poetry Journal is a new nonprofit publication interested in creating a means for provoking opinions, ideas, and thoughtful responses for poets in the Greater Burlington area. The Burlington Poetry Journal is an independent publication that is dedicated to the concept that art should be free and accessible to everyone. In a world with so many voices we believe in a community based, eclectic approach to the publication of poetry. Therefore, the BPJ will always welcome any form or style within its pages.While there are numerous outlets for writers to gather and share privately in Vermont, there is no publication that brings together poetry of all styles and writers of all ages for the enjoyment of the general public. It is our hope that this journal will inspire writers to share their work with others who may be unaware of their talent, and for those who have never considered themselves writers to try their hand at poetry. We invite you to submit your work and share with others your thoughts and abilities with the Burlington community. The work you share will produce a dialogue as writers become aware of each other and begin to expose themselves and others to new poetry. The eclectic nature of the Burlington Poetry Journal will serve to stimulate its readers and authors. They are currently working towards achieving a non-profit 501(c)3 status.

8) Tarpaulin Sky

Founded in 2002 as an online literary journal, Tarpaulin Sky took the form of 12.5 internet issues (see the archive) before its first paper edition in November 2007, and the magazine continues to publish new work both online and in print. In addition to these issues, Tarpaulin Sky publishes work by individual authors in its “chronic content” section, as well as online-only book reviews

Tarpaulin Sky focuses on cross-genre / trans-genre / hybrid forms as well as innovative poetry and prose. The journal is not allied with any one style or school or network of writers; rather, we try to avoid some of the defects associated with dipping too often into the same literary gene pool, and the diversity of our contributors is evidence of our eclectic interests (….)10) The Mountain Review

Colchester High School’s English Department has been publishing an interesting literary magazine: The Mountain Review. The Mountain Review is sponsored by the Vermont Council of Teachers of English Language Arts (VCTELA). Generally, the mission is to publish work from Vermont students, K-12. The Mountain Review has published poems, essays, short stories, excerpts from larger works, and art work. Wayland Cole and Katie Lenox have been the editors for several years; both teach at Colchester. Before them, Shelia Mable, a South Burlington teacher, was the editor for many years.

2009’s Mountain Review is over 100 pages long!

Students at all Vermont schools can enter the competition to be published in the Mountain Review. If you have questions, feel free to call them at (802) 264-5700 or email at colew@csdvt.org or lenoxk@csdvt.org. Send orders for copies of The Mountain Review to Katie Lenox at: Colchester High School, PO Box 900, Colchester, VT 05446. Send $5 per book; $2 postage to ship 1-3 books. Checks payable to the VCTELA.

11) The Salon: A Journal of Poetry & Fiction

The Honeybee Press is a brand-new writer’s cooperative based in Burlington, Vermont. The first book from the press is its bi-annual literary magazine, The Salon: A Journal of Poetry & Fiction. The goal of the press is to produce high-quality local literature and make it more affordable and visible to the public. To submit to The Salon, see the guidelines listed on its web address.

  • Click on link for submission guidelines.

12) Hunger Mountain

Hunger Mountain is both a print and online journal of the arts. We publish fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, visual art, young adult and children’s writing, writing for stage and screen, interviews, reviews, and craft essays. Our print issue comes out annually in the fall, and our online content changes on a regular basis. (….)

Hunger Mountain SubscriptionsVermont College of Fine Arts
36 College Street
Montpelier, VT 05602

Subscription Prices
One Year $12.00
Two Year $22.00
Four Year $40.00 (Save $8!)
Back issues $8.00

13) The Onion River Review

The Onion River Review is a literary journal whose annual edition features poetry, prose, and visual arts. The Onion River Review is edited by the students of Saint Michael’s College in Vermont, and is committed to publishing work from students, faculty, staff, alumni, and the greater community.

The Onion River ReviewWilliam Marquess, Advisor
One Winooski Park #171
Colchester, VT 05439

14) Route Seven – The St. Albans Literary Guild Magazine

The first issue of the Saint Albans Literary Guild’s magazine, Route Seven: A Vermont Literary Journal, is a 56-page publication featuring new and established writers and artists with an emphasis on Northwestern Vermont writers. Strong literary and non-fiction voices from other regions are also featured and are encouraged to submit to future issues.

ST. ALBANS: The Saint Albans Literary Guild is proud to announce the release of the premiere issue of Route 7, a new Vermont literary journal, on Sat., Feb. 20, at the STAART Gallery in St. Albans. The event will feature readings from contributing authors, as well as hors d’oeuvres and beverages.
Route 7 is a 56-page magazine featuring fiction, non-fiction, humor, poetry, and artwork. The first issue includes a wide range of moods, from the introspective and idyllic to the offbeat and humorous. The more than 20 contributors included hail from Franklin County, and across Vermont and New Hampshire. The magazine aims to highlight creative voices from across the region. (….)

15)

15) Vantage Point

Vantage Point is the arts and literary journal at the University of Vermont. VP is a student-run journal, supported by generous funding from the Student Government Association at UVM, which allows them to circulate the journal to students and the general public for free. They also receive funding from the Mary Brigham Buckham Fund, through UVM’s English Department.

Vantage Point was established in 2002 by a group of students in the Honors College who felt that UVM needed a literary journal. In the past, they have published strictly student work, however this past semester they opened up the submission pool to faculty and to the general public. They are continuing to go that route this semester as well.

51.)

VERMONT LITERARY GROUPS’ ANTHOLOGIES

1) Vermont Voices, An Anthology

Published by the League of Vermont Writers periodically. They have just published their 3rd anthology.

  • Vermont Voices I (published in 1991)
  • Vermont Voices II (published in 1995)
  • Vermont Voices III (published in 1999)

2) *See Below

Published by the Otter Creek Poets periodically. They have just published their 3rd volume.

  • By the Waterfall (published in 1999)
  • Maps and Voyages (published in 2004)
  • Line By Line (published in 2006)

No web site to date. All editions and issues out of print and no longer available.

3) League of Vermont Writers

Published by the Mad River Poets periodically. They have just published their 3rd volume.

  • Pebbles from the Stream (published in 2002)
  • Maps and Voyages (published in 2004)
  • Line By Line (published in 2006)

4) The Mountain Troubadour

  • Published by the Poetry Society of Vermont annually.

52.) VERMONT POETRY BLOGS

1) PoemShape

Patrick Gillespie maintains a bright, intelligent blog. There is a decided bias in favoring poetry that is written in meter, that uses form, or that plays with language in ways that separate poetry from prose – rhetoric, imagery, simile, metaphor, conceit, rhyme, meter — Traditional Poetry.

PoemShape is now the home of the Vermont Poetry Newsletter & Poetry Event Calendar.

One can subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new postings by email.

53.)

STATE POETRY SOCIETY

The Poetry Society of Vermont, founded in 1947, is an association of poets and supporters who join in promoting an interest in poetry through meetings, workshops, readings, contests, and contributions to the society’s chapbook. Anyone may join the society including high school and college students and non-residents of Vermont. We welcome both writers and appreciative readers. 

Membership in PSOV

Benefits:
  • 2 luncheon/ workshops a year where a professional poet critiques your poems
  • one hands- on writing workshop and reading under the direction of a professional poet
  • the opportunity to enter contests judged by professional poets and to win awards
  • fellowship with appreciative readers and writers of poetry
  • opportunity for publication in the PSOV chapbook, The Mountain Troubadour
How to join:
mail dues of $20.00 to Membership Chairman, P.O. Box 1215, Waitsfield, VT 05673
include your name, mailing address, telephone, and e-mail address for Membership List
memberships are renewed by January 1 of each year 

The PSOV has 2 current books available for sale:
1) The Mountain Troubadour – 2010 – Curl up with interesting, award-winning poetry from a wonderful group of poets.  This book is only $8 (+$1 to mail).  To get yourself a copy, call or write to Betty Gaechter, 134 Hitzel Terrace, Rutland, VT 05701, 773-8679.  This little booklet may be just the thing to get you involved with the PSOV for a lifetime of friendships.
2) Brighten the Barn – 60th Anniversary Anthology – 1947-2007 – An Anthology of Poems by Members of the Poetry Society of Vermont.  99 pages of quality poetry; that’s a lot of beautiful poetry for only $12.  If you get it through me (Ron Lewis), it’s only $12.  If you want it shipped to you, the PSOV wants an extra amount to cover tax and shipping ($0.72 + $3.00).  This book retails for $15, but a reduced price is now in play to unload the few remaining copies.

54.) YEAR-ROUND POETRY WORKSHOPS IN VERMONT


BELLOWS FALLS

1) Great River Arts Institute – See details elsewhere in this newsletter

2) Poetry Workshop at Village Square Booksellers with Jim Fowler (no relation to owner Pat).  The goal of this course is to introduce more people to the art of writing poetry and will include a discussion of modern poetry in various forms and styles. Each week, the course will provide time to share and discuss participant’s poetry. Poetry Workshops on Monday mornings (9:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m.) – Jim Fowler’s sessions continue, with periodic break for a few weeks between sessions.  Students should bring a poem and copies to the first class. The course will be limited to 5 to 8 students to allow adequate time to go through everyone’s poetry contributions and will meet in the café at Village Square Booksellers. James Fowler, of Charlestown, New Hampshire, has a Masters Degree in Environmental Science with a major in Nature Writing. He was the editor of Heartbeat of New England, a poetry anthology. Fowler has been widely published since 1998 in such journals as Connecticut Review, Quarterly of Light Verse, and Larcom Review. Fowler is a founding member of the River Voices Writer’s Circle, and a regular reader at Village Square Booksellers-River Voices Poetry Readings. The fee for this 6-week Workshop is $100, payable to Mr. Fowler at the first class. Pre-registration for the Poetry Workshop is suggested and may be made by calling Village Square Booksellers at 802-463-9404 or by email at vsbooks@sover.net or  jfowler177@comcast.net.

3) InkBlot Complex Poetry Workshop runs through the Vermont Independent Media’s Media Mentoring Project and is held at the Rockingham Public Library at 65 Westminster Street in Bellows Falls.  No previous writing or journalism experience or even class attendance is required.  Participants are invited to bring a project or share successful techniques.  The workshop aims to lift poetry from the page and reveal how it is a living force in daily life.  Originally taught at the University of Illinois at Chicago to great acclaim, its interactive nature and inclusion of multiple art forms leaves dry, academic notions of poetry behind.  It functions through three tenets: 1) Presentation of the art form as a living element of our daily world, 2) individualized, personal enrichment and free range of expression for each student, and 3) artistic cultivation through unexpected means.  Taught by seasoned arts journalist, cultural critic and poet Clara Rose Thornton, this free event explores the poetry we encounter all around us – in songs we hear, the ways we express ourselves, even the advertisements we see.  In the final session students then create their own works with an increased sense of connection to the way words construct meaning.  All materials are provided.  Instructor Clara Rose Thornton is an internationally published film, wine and visual arts critic, music journalist, poet and former book and magazine editor.  Her writings on culture and the arts have appeared nationally in Stop Smiling: The Magazine for High-Minded Lowlifes, Honest Tune: The American Journal of Jam and Time Out Chicago.  Currently residing in an artists’ colony in Windham County, she acts as the biweekly arts columnist for the Rutland Herald, staff writer for Southern Vermont Arts & Living and a regular contributor to The Commons.  A portfolio, bio and roster of writing and editing services can be found at www.clararosethornton.com.  For more information about the Media Mentoring Project, visit www.commonsnews.org or call 246-6397.  You can also write to Vermont Independent Media at P.O. Box 1212, Brattleboro, VT 05302.

For more on the InkBlot Complex Poetry Workshop, see description under Other Poetry Workshops in Vermont (Anywhere, VT).

BERLIN

The Wayside Poets, who share their poetry publicly from time to time, have been meeting irregularly for the past 25 years. They used to be called The Academy Street Poets. Membership is by invitation only. They meet now at the Wayside Restaurant & Bakery in Berlin. Members include Diane Swan, Sherry Olson, Carol Henrikson and Sarah Hooker. You can contact them through Sherry Olson at: solsonvt@aol.com or 454-8026.

BURLINGTON

The Cherry Lane Poets are a small group (7-8) of poets that meet on the first Thursday of every month. The membership has been kept to a minimum so that poets will have all the time they need during critiques. Each poet has been or is a member of another poetry critiquing group, so the information passed to each other is more professional than that of most poetry groups. The primary goal of this group is to polish their work, get it submitted, and have it published. Each member brings a new poem with them, with enough copies to pass around, and reads it aloud to the group; it gets critiqued by each member during the following month, and those critiques are presented at the next meeting. Regina Brault is the contact person, (802) 860-1018; membership is by invitation only.

The Burlington Poets Society, a group of “stanza scribblers” that express their love of verse, made up of UVM students and professors, have recently organized, meeting at the Fleming Museum at UVM in Burlington for their periodic “The Painted Word” series of poetry readings.

GUILFORD

The Johnson Writer’s Group, newly formed on January 26, 2011, meets weekly on Wednesday evenings from 7:00 to 9:00, at the Johnson Public Library on Railroad Street, in the front room. This is a free drop-in prompt writing group modeled after the Burlington Writing Group that’s been going strong for many years now. The writers themselves decide on a prompt and write for 20 minutes, followed by a go-around reading.  They usually get in two writes depending on the group’s size.  All genres and experience levels are welcomed and there really are no rules other than not interrupting folks while they are writing.  They don’t really do much critiquing though some spontaneous reactions do occur!  This group believes that it’s just good practice to show up and write for 40 minutes and share the writing if so inclined…  Feel free to join this group on a perpetual basis or whenever you’re in town.  Contact is Cynthia Hennard at (802) 363-5541 or (802) 730-8125.

JOHNSON

The Guilford Poets Guild, formed in 1998, meets twice a month to critique and support each other’s work.  Their series of sponsored readings by well-known poets which began at the Dudley Farm, continues now at the Women and Family Life Center.

MIDDLEBURY

1.) The Otter Creek Poets offer a poetry workshop every Thursday afternoon, from 1:00 to 3:00 in the basement meeting room of the Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main Street, Middlebury. This workshop, the largest and oldest of its kind in the state, has been meeting weekly for 13 years. Poets of all ages and styles come for peer feedback, encouragement, and optional weekly assignments to get the poetry flowing. Bring a poem or two to share (plus 20 copies). The workshops are led by David Weinstock. There is considerable parking available behind the library, or further down the hill below that parking lot. For more information, call David at 388-6939 or Ron Lewis at 247-5913.

2) The Spring Street Poets.  This group is by invite only and consists of six members, Jennifer Bates, Janet Fancher, Karin Gottshall, Ray Hudson, Mary Pratt and David Weinstock.

MONTPELIER: Vermont College of Fine Arts

Established in 1981, the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing Program was one of the first low-residency programs in the country. The Atlantic named it one of the top five low-residency programs nationwide. At each MFA in Writing residency, a renowned poetry or prose writer joins the program for a substantial portion of the residency. The author gives a reading and/or talk, meets with numerous students individually, and is available in many informal ways throughout the residency to interact with students. The College publishes Hunger Mountain: the VCFA Journal of the Arts and writers may choose to attend a summer residency in Slovenia, in lieu of Vermont.

PANTON

This town is the home of Leonard Gibbs and his Dead Creek Poets Society. Leonard Gibbs is a member of the Otter Creek Poets and Poetry Society of Vermont, is the Magister Ludi of The Dead Creek Poets’ Society.  Leonard invites visitors to his web site, Quibbles.com, and subsequent comments for discussion; send him some of your poetry for free critiques!  He’s really very good.  Leonard’s email address is: ML_Len@Quibbles.org.  Interesting responses to items Leonard has posed on his site may end up on the site itself.

Leonard also publishes the Poet’s Corner, a regular monthly column in the Addison Independent.  The newspaper has recently informed Len that they would like to have more poetry published in their newspaper, so Len is asking poets from anywhere in Vermont to send him material for him to review for future articles in Poet’s Corner.

NORWICH

This group meets on the first Sunday of every month at the Norwich Library, 6:30 p.m.

SAINT ALBANS

The Saint Albans Literary Guild organizes author readings, classes on writing and literature, and other book related events. The Guild is sponsoring a new literary magazine featuring local writers. Finally, it promotes Vermont authors, book groups, writing groups, and literary events held in Franklin County and northwestern Vermont. Contact us for more information or join the Guild to become involved with literary endeavors in your area.

The first issue of the Saint Albans Literary Guild’s magazine, Route Seven: A Vermont Literary Journal, is a 56-page publication featuring new and established writers and artists with an emphasis on Northwestern Vermont writers. Strong literary and non-fiction voices from other regions are also featured and are encouraged to submit to future issues.

Contact them through their web site or through Jay Fleury, Guild President.

SPRINGFIELD

A Writer’s Group has started to meet at the Springfield Town Library on the fourth Monday of each month, from 7 to 8 pm. For more information, call 885-3108.

STOWE

There is another poetry workshop happening in Stowe, but unfortunately I know nothing much about this group. If you do, contact me!

WAITSFIELD

The Mad River Poets consists of a handful of poets from the Route 100 corridor. More on this group in the future.


55.)

OTHER POETRY WORKSHOPS IN VERMONT

BURLINGTON

Scribes in the making put pen to paper as part of an open verse-writing session at the Fletcher Free Library, 235 College Street.  Contact information: 862-1094.

ANYWHERE, VERMONT

Revived for the 2009 academic year is the InkBlot Complex Poetry Workshop, designed for upper-elementary and high-school-age students, grades 7-12. The curriculum functions through three tenets:

  • Innovative presentation of the art form as a living element of our daily world
  • Individualized, personal enrichment and free range of expression for each student
  • Artistic cultivation through unexpected means

The workshop debuted at the University of Illinois at Chicago, during a three-week summer program, entitled Project C.H.A.N.C.E., for underprivileged sophomore and senior students from area high schools. It was a fantastic success, and the program director requested its return. With this encouragement, I decided to expand and adapt the workshop for various age levels, as an educational/arts supplement for after-school programs and enrichment programs and an arts elective for more traditional academic settings. The response has been wonderful. (…) Click on Typewriter for more…

WHITE RIVER JUNCTION

The Writer’s Center
58 Main Street, White River Junction, Vermont

Instructor: April Ossmann (author of Anxious Music, Four Way Books, 2007, writing, editing and publishing consultant, and former Executive Director of Alice James Books)

Info: (802)333-9597 or aprilossmann@hotmail.com and http://www.aprilossmann.com.

56.)

YEAR-ROUND POETRY WRITING CENTERS IN VERMONT

BURLINGTON

The Burlington Writer’s Group (BWG) meets on Tuesday evenings from 7-9 PM and has a new home at the Unitarian Church in the church’s little white house off of Clark St., 2nd floor. They’d like to let people know and also invite anyone interested to join them whenever folks are in town or as often as they’d like.

The Burlington Writer’s Group is a free drop-in group. They decide on a prompt and write for 20 minutes, followed by a go-around reading. They can usually get in two writes depending on group size. All genres and experience levels are welcome and there really are no rules other than demonstrating courtesy while people are writing (don’t interrupt). They don’t do much critiquing though some spontaneous reactions occur. Mainly it’s good practice to just show up and write for 40 minutes and share the writing, if so inclined…

BURLINGTON

Women Writing for (a) Change supports the authentic experience of women who honor themselves through creative writing. Our community supports reflection as we move into our questions and awaken to change. Participants enhance expressive skills, strengthen their voices, deepen themselves as women as writers for positive change in all spheres of life. Creative writing in all genres is our shared vehicle. Women Writing for (a) Change is for women who, 1) dream of writing for self-discovery, for personal or social healing, 2) hunger for creative process in their lives, 3) yearn to explore their feminine voice, 4) crave reflective, space, and 5) are in transition. For more information, go to their web site at www.leagueofvermontwriters.org or contact Sarah Bartlett at either 899-3772 or sarah@womenwritingvt.com.

JOHNSON

Vermont Studio Center

Founded by artists in 1984, the Vermont Studio Center is the largest international artists’ and writers’ Residency Program in the United States, hosting 50 visual artists and writers each month from across the country and around the world.

The Vermont Studio Center offers four-to-twelve-week studio residencies year-round to 600 painters, sculptors, printmakers, photographers, and writers (50 residents per month). VSC’s 30-building campus is set on the banks of the Gihon River in rural Johnson, Vermont, a town of 3,000 located in the heart of the northern Green Mountains. Each Studio Center residency features undistracted working time, the companionship of fifty artists and writers from across the country and around the world, and access to a roster of prominent Visiting Artists and Writers. All residencies include comfortable housing, private studio space, and excellent food. Two Visiting Writers per month are in residence for one week each to offer readings, a craft talk, and optional conferences with each of the 10-14 writers in residence each month.

MONTPELIER

Vermont College of Fine Arts

Established in 1981, the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing Program was one of the first low-residency programs in the country. The Atlantic named it one of the top five low-residency programs nationwide.  At each MFA in Writing residency, a renowned poetry or prose writer joins the program for a substantial portion of the residency. The author gives a reading and/or talk, meets with numerous students individually, and is available in many informal ways throughout the residency to interact with students. The College publishes Hunger Mountain: the VCFA Journal of the Arts and writers may choose to attend a summer residency in Slovenia, in lieu of Vermont.

SPRINGFIELD

A Writer’s Group has started to meet at the Springfield Town Library on the fourth Monday of each month, from 7 to 8 pm. For more information, call 885-3108.

WHITE RIVER JUNCTION

The Writer’s Center is for serious writers and nervous beginners. It’s for procrastinators who could benefit from regular deadlines – and for the prolific who could benefit from quality feedback. It’s for anyone with a manuscript hidden in a drawer, or a life story or poem waiting to be written. It’s for people who don’t know where to start or how to end. And for writers who are doing just fine on their own, but would like the company of other writers. The Writer’s Center is for anyone who is writing or wants to write. One of the Center’s consultants is April Ossman. Founded by Joni B. Cole and Sarah Stewart Taylor, the Writer’s Center offers instruction and inspiration through a selection of workshops, discussions, and community. We would love to see you – and your writing – at The Writer’s Center!

  • The Writer’s Center” has a new Facebook Page that we’re now using to spread the word about workshops, offer writing tips, share publishing news, etc. If you haven’t already, be a part of the page by following the link below and clicking “like”. Write on!

57.)

OTHER WRITING GROUPS IN VERMONT

The League of Vermont Writers.

The League is open to all who make writing a part of their lives. We offer encouragement, motivation, and networking opportunities to writers with a broad range of writing experience.
You do not need to be published to join. Visit their Membership Page for more information about benefits and fees.
Founded in 1929, LVW’s mission is to:

  • Help writers develop their skills
  • Promote responsible and ethical writing and writing practices
  • Increase communication between professional writers and publishers
  • Promote an enduring appreciation for the power of the word

The LVW publishes Vermont Voices, An Anthology, at irregular times. They have published 3 separate volumes to date.

58.)

POETRY EVENT CALENDAR

Below please find the most current list of poetry happenings in Vermont for the near future. Please be aware that these events can be found on Poetz.com, but there is usually additional information that is typed here that would be cumbersome to place on Poetz.com. Please note all events are Vermont-based unless they are of extreme importance or happen to lie just outside our borders. If you would like to save on paper and ink, please just highlight what you need, or perhaps only events for the coming month, and print that information. All events are advertised as free unless indicated otherwise.

Wed, Mar 30: Fleming Museum at the University of Vermont, 61 Colchester Avenue, Burlington, 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.. The Painted Word Poetry Series. The Fleming Museum presents a poetry series organized by Major Jackson, Professor, UVM Dept. of English. Todd Hearon and Maggie Dietz will be reading. The Painted Word poetry series highlights established and emergent New England poets whose work represents significant explorations into language, song, and art. The Painted Word poetry series is a collaboration of the Fleming Museum and the UVM Department of English with support from the James and Mary Brigham Buckman Fund.

Thu, Mar 31: The Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main Street, Montpelier, 7:00 p.m.. Poetry Alive! Kick-off with poet Baron Wormser. In 2000 Wormser was appointed Poet Laureate of Maine by Governor Angus King. He served in that capacity for six years and visited many libraries and schools throughout Maine. Wormser has received numerous awards for his poetry. He directs the Frost Place Conference on Poetry and Teaching at the Frost Place in Franconia, New Hampshire. He currently resides in Cabot, Vermont, with his wife. Info, 223-3338, Sallen@kellogghubbard.org, http://www.kellogghubbard.org.

Thu, Mar 31: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m.. Rosanna Warren. Rosanna Warren is the author of one chapbook of poems (Snow Day, Palaemon Press, 1981), and three collections of poems: Each Leaf Shines Separate (Norton, 1984), Stained Glass (Norton, 1993), and Departure (Norton, 2003). Her new book of poems, Ghost in a Red Hat, is due out from Norton in 2011. Fables of the Self: Studies in Lyric Poetry, a book of literary criticism, appeared from Norton in 2008. She edited and contributed to The Art of Translation: Voices From the Field (Northeastern, 1989), and has edited three chapbooks of poetry by prisoners.She has won fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, ACLS, The Ingram Merrill Foundation, and the Lila Wallace Readers’ Digest Fund, among others. Stained Glass won the Lamont Poetry Award from the Academy of American Poets. She has won the Witter Bynner Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Lavan Younger Poets’ Prize from the Academy of American Poets, and the Award of Merit in Poetry from The American Academy of Arts and Letters in 2004. She was a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets from 1999 – 2005. You can view some of her published books on the Norton website.

Fri-Sun, Apr 1-3: Various downtown Montpelier locations, all day. Poetry Alive! 2011. Montpelier celebrates National Poetry Month with a text display through downtown that lovers of lit can wander for a taste of contemporary Vermont poetry. Info, 223-3338, Rysenechal@kellogghubbard.org, http://www.kellogghubbard.org/poetryalive.html.

Sat, Apr 2: Richmond Free Library, 201 Bridge Street, Richmond, 7:30 p.m.. Social Band presents: Earthly Ground: VT Poetry & Song Project, Part 1. Burlington’s lively band of singers presents a program featuring works of VT composers using poetry of VT poets, in celebration of this place that is Vermont, with premieres of ten new works. Please note: $15 donation/$10 students/low income. Info, 658-8488, info@socialband.org, http://www.socialband.org.

Sun, Apr 3: Bristol First Baptist Church, 10 Park Street, Bristol, 4:00 p.m.. Social Band presents: Earthly Ground: VT Poetry & Song Project, Part 1. Burlington’s lively band of singers presents a program featuring works of VT composers using poetry of VT poets, in celebration of this place that is Vermont, with premieres of ten new works. Please note: $15 donation/$10 students/low income. Info, 658-8488, info@socialband.org, http://www.socialband.org.

Mon, Apr 4: Sherburne Memorial Library, River Road, Killington, 7:00 p.m..Killington Arts Guild’s A Gathering of Poets. This is always a lively group, usually about 15 poets reading original poetry (or favorite poems) for 2-3 minutes each, then repeating the order, reading for another 2-3 minutes. Refreshments. Info, Betty Little, 786-9920, Sambjl@aol.com, or Lauren Wilder, 299-1777.

Wed, Apr 6: The Savoy Theater, Montpelier, 26 Main Street, time unknown. Poetry Alive! Dead Poets Society. The Savoy Theater’s CineClub will host the screening of the 1989 movie, Dead Poets Society, featuring Robin Williams, followed by our own Dead poets night of elocution. Recite your favorite dead poets for the audience. Anthologies will be provided for those who have not memorized beforehand but would liek to read. PG 13. Free. Info, 223-3338.

Wed, Apr 6: Fletcher Free Library, 235 College Street, Burlington, 7:00p.m.. They Still Do Write Them The Way They Used To. Refuting the notion that modern poetry is formless and self-absorbed, poet Michael Palma considers contemporary poets who use rhyme, meter, and figurative language to explore timeless, universal themes. A program of the Vermont Humanities Council. Info, vermonthumanities.org, 262-2626, or 865-7211 (library).

Wed, Apr 6: Norwich Public Library, 368 Main Street, Norwich, 7:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m.. An Evening of Latin American Poetry. Amherst College professor Ilan Stavans reads poems by Rubén Darío, Jorge Luis Borges, Gabriela Mistral, Pablo Neruda, Octavio Paz, and others — parts of a tradition in which words are mechanisms of resistance against oppression. Part of the First Wednesdays series. A Vermont Humanities Council event. A program of the Vermont Humanities Council. Info, vermonthumanities.org, 262-2626, or 388-4095 (library).

Wed, Apr 6: Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main Street, Middlebury, 7:00p.m.-8:00 p.m.. Poems of Faith and Doubt. Dartmouth professor Peter Saccio discusses belief and disbelief and issues of moral choice and divine grace as they appear in one poem each y Wallace Stevens, Philip Larkin, W.H. Auden, and George Herbert. A program of the Vermont Humanities Council. Info, vermonthumanities.org, 262-2626, or 649-1184 (library).

Thu, Apr 7: The Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main Street, Montpelier,1:30 p.m.. Everyone Can Be a Poet. We think in poems. Our thoughts don’t come to us in well constructed sentences and paragraphs but in gorgeous and crazy images invoking all the senses. Surprising, colorful, seemingly unconnected images stream through our thoughts all the time. This is what poems are made of. Sherry Olson will bring some poems to inspire you to write your own poems. We will write, and then all writers who want to, will share their poems with the group. It is fun! This workshop is limited to 20 people – registration is required by calling 223-3338 or signing up at the adult circulation desk.
 Sherry Olson was born in Fargo, North Dakota, and has lived in Vermont for more than twenty-five years. She works as a literacy teacher and frequently leads poetry workshops and book discussion groups. She and her husband live in Plainfield, Vermont, and have one son. Info, Rysenechal@kellogghubbard.org, http://www.kellogghubbard.org/poetryalive.html.

Sat, Apr 9: First Baptist Church 81 St. Paul Street, Burlington, 7:30 p.m.. Social Band presents: Earthly Ground: VT Poetry & Song Project, Part 1. Burlington’s lively band of singers presents a program featuring works of VT composers using poetry of VT poets, in celebration of this place that is Vermont, with premieres of ten new works. Please note: $15 donation/$10 students/low income. Info, 658-8488, info@socialband.org, http://www.socialband.org.

Sun, Apr 10: Congregational Church, 403 Church Hill Road, Charlotte, 4:00 p.m.. Social Band presents: Earthly Ground: VT Poetry & Song Project, Part 1. Burlington’s lively band of singers presents a program featuring works of VT composers using poetry of VT poets, in celebration of this place that is Vermont, with premieres of ten new works. Please note: $15 donation/$10 students/low income. Info, 658-8488, info@socialband.org, http://www.socialband.org.

Mon, Apr 11: The Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main Street, Montpelier, 7:00 p.m.. Bob and Charles Barasch Poetry Reading. The father son poetic team join up again for a dynamic reading of their own works at the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Info, 223-3338, http://www.kellogghubbard.org.

Tue, Apr 12: Vermont History Museum, Snelling Room, 109 State Street, Montpelier, 2:00 p.m.. Making Poetry Memorable through Music with Burt Porter. This presentation explores the relationship between poetry and music, including the mnemonic aspects of rhyme, meter, and melody. Poet and musician Burt Porter sings musical settings of poems by Marlowe, Burns, Housman, Yeats, and others to illustrate the discussion, using the violin and mandolin as accompaniment. Info, http://www.kellogghubbard.org/poetryalive.html.

Tue, Apr 12: Vermont Humanities Council offices, 11 Loomis Street, Montpelier, 5:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m.. “You Come Too” Poetry Discussion: Billy Collins. Examine selected works of influential poets with Vermont Humanities Council Executive Director Peter Gilbert. The April 12 discussion will consider the poetry of Billy Collins: “Fishing on the Susquehanna in July,” “Morning,” “Her,” “Canada,” “Reading an Anthology of Chinese Poems…,” “Nostalgia,” “The Death of Allegory,” and “Creatures.” A Vermont Humanities Council event in presented in partnership with Poetry Alive! and the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Info, 262-2626 x307.

Wed, Apr 13: Norwich Bookstore, 291 Main Street, Norwich, 7:00 p.m.. Jeff Friedman. Please help us celebrate the publication of Keene State College Professor, Jeff Friedman’s fifth collection of poetry, Working in Flour. His poems, mini stories, and translations have appeared in many literary magazines, including American Poetry Review, Poetry, 5 AM, Margie, Agni Online, Poetry International, Prairie Schooner, Antioch Review, Quick Fiction, Nighttrain, and The New Republic. Free and open to the public. Reservations strongly suggested as seating is limited. Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com.

Thu, Apr 14: The Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main Street, Montpelier, 7:00 p.m.. Leland Kinsey. Acclaimed Vermont poet Leland Kinsey will read his original works at the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. In addition to his six books of poetry in print, he has published articles in magazines such as YANKEE and Vermont LIFE.Info, 223-3338, Rysenechal@kellogghubbard.org, http://www.kellogghubbard.org.

Mon, Apr 18: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m.. Stephen Dunn. Stephen Dunn is the author of sixteen collections of poetry, including Here and Now, which will be published by Norton in May, 2011. His Different Hours was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 2001. Among his many other awards are The Paterson Prize for Sustained Literary Achievement, an Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts & Letters, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. He is Distinguished Professor of Creative Writing at Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, but spends most of his time these days in Frostburg, Maryland, with his wife, the writer Barbara Hurd.

Tue, Apr 19: The Galaxy Bookshop, 7 Mill Street, Hardwick, 7:00 p.m.- 8:00 p.m.. Baron Wormser. Local poet, and former Maine poet laureate, Baron Wormser will read from his new book Impenitent Notes. Using forms from free verse to sestina, Wormser writes poems that ares emphatically about people—how they do and do not accommodate themselves to the ever present hand of time. Whether following the life of a rock band through its various incarnations or imagining the meeting of Rilke and Babe Ruth or speaking to a mother who has lost her soldier son in Iraq, Wormser gets inside his characters’ hearts and minds. Info, 472-5533.

Wed, Apr 20: Norwich Bookstore, 291 Main Street, Norwich, 7:00 p.m.. Sydney Lea and Page Starzinger will share the podium for the second of three Poetry Month readings at the Norwich Bookstore. Young of the Year — The poems in this new collection by long-time Upper Valley resident Sydney Lea range widely as they stretch out over considered, affective sentences that call to mind the heady “wail and whisper and funk” of musicians like Clifford Brown and Clyde McPhatter, the New England musings of Robert Frost, and Robert Penn Warren’s narratives and anecdotes. Casting a candid and contemplative look back at a life lived and out at a world alive with motion, Young of the Year shows us a poet who poignantly traces the intersection between the worlds of nature, science, and the spiritual. Unshelter — Winner of the 2008 national chapbook contest which was judged by Mary Jo Bang, Page Starzinger spends her days wrestling words for the commercial world. The daughter of Norwich Bookstore neighbors, she will read recent poetry and selections from Unshelter. Free and open to the public. Reservations strongly suggested as seating is limited. Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com.

Fri, Apr 22: The Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main Street, Montpelier, 7:00 p.m.. All-Ages Poetry Slam with Geof Hewitt. Join Vermont Slam Master Geof Hewitt in this fun all-ages poetry competition at the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Perform your poem (5 minutes of less) before an audience of your friends and neighbors..Info, 223-3338, Rysenechal@kellogghubbard.org, http://www.kellogghubbard.org.

Wed, Apr 27: Norwich Bookstore, 291 Main Street, Norwich, 7:00 p.m.. Phyllis Beck Katz and Ewa Chrusciel will share the podium for the final evening of poetry during Poetry Month at the Norwich Bookstore. All Roads Go Where They Will — In her first book, Norwich writer, Phyllis Katz has selected poems expressing joy in the natural world and the world of art. The book has a dark underside in which death, peril, and loss are faced head on. In the great Romantic tradition of Frost and Kunitz, Katz counters grief and despair with her ability to look beyond dark moments and treasure the gifts that life offers. As she says in the book’s final poem addressed to her husband of many years, “to have held each other through times of / pain and darkness / will have been enough.” Early readers of the book have been delighted by its unpretentious sagacity. Strata — A hybrid text, Strata incorporates letters and poems, it investigates issues of identity, mediation, protest, Central European politics, and the Sublime. Strata, which means “loss” in Polish, “accumulations” in English, is Ewa Chrusciel’s longest work originally written in English, with Polish and other languages interwoven sporadically. She was born in southern Poland and currently teaches literature at Colby-Sawyer College. Free and open to the public. Reservations strongly suggested as seating is limited. Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com.

Mon, May 2: Marlboro College, South Road, Ragle Hall, Windham, 7:00 p.m.. An Evening of Poetry – Martin Espada. Called “the Latino poet of his generation” and the “Pablo Neruda of North American authors,” Martín Espada was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1957. He has published more than fifteen books as a poet, editor, essayist and translator. His new collection of poems is called The Trouble Ball (Norton, 2011). The Republic of Poetry, a collection published by Norton in 2006, received the Paterson Award for Sustained Literary Achievement and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Info, Chris Lenois, 251-7644, pr@marlboro.edu, http://www.marlboro.edu.

Wed, May 4: Fletcher Free Library, 235 College Street, Burlington, 7:00 p.m.. The Passages of Herman Melville. College professor Jay Parini reflects on Melville’s various voyages and how each led to a particular book or series of books.. A program of the Vermont Humanities Council. Info, vermonthumanities.org, 262-2626, or 865-7211 (library).

Wed, May 11: Vermont Humanities Council offices, 11 Loomis Street, Montpelier, 5:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m.. “You Come Too” Poetry Discussion: Seamus Heaney. Examine selected works of influential poets with Vermont Humanities Council Executive Director Peter Gilbert. The May 11 discussion will consider the poetry of Seamus Heaney: “Mid-Term Break,” “Digging,” and others. A Vermont Humanities Council event in presented in partnership with Poetry Alive! and the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Info, 262-2626 x307.

Thu, May 12: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m.. David Ferry. David Ferry is Sophie Chantal Hart Professor of English, Emeritus, Wellesley College; Visiting Lecturer, Graduate Creative Writing Program, Boston University. His most recent book of poems is Of No Country I Know: New and Selected Poems (University of Chicago Press, 1999). His translations are (all of them published by Farrar Straus and Giroux): Gilgamesh: A New Rendering in English Verse (1992), The Odes of Horace (1997), The Eclogues of Virgil (1999), The Epistles of Horace (2001), The Georgics of Virgil (2005). Currently, he is completing a new set of collected poems and is translating The Aeneid of Virgil. Of No Country I Know received the Lenmore Marshall Prize, Academy of American Poets, and the Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry, Library of Congress. For The Epistles of Horace, Ferry was awarded the Harold Morton Landon Translation Award. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and Honorary Fellow, Academy of American Poets, and has received an Academy Award for Literature, American Academy of Arts and Letters. He has received an honorary degree, D.Litt, from Amherst College.

Mon, May 30: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m.. Jane Hirshfield. Jane Hirshfield is the author six poetry collections, most recently After (HarperCollins), named a best book of 2006 by The Washington Post, The San Francisco Chronicle, and England’s Financial Times. Other honors include major fellowships from the Academy of American Poets, National Endowment for the Arts, and the Guggenheim and Rockefeller foundations. Her seventh poetry collection will be published by Knopf in August, 2011. Hirshfield is also the author of a now-classic collection of essays, Nine Gates: Entering the Mind of Poetry and three equally classic books collecting the work of women poets of the past. Her work appears in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, the TLS, The New Republic, Poetry, and five editions of The Best American Poems. For more information on Jane Hirshfield, visit Barclay Agency’s website.

Thu, Jun 9: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m.. Natasha Trethewey. Natasha Trethewey is author of Native Guard (Houghton Mifflin), for which she won the 2007 Pulitzer Prize; Bellocq’s Ophelia (Graywolf, 2002) which was named a Notable Book for 2003 by the American Library Association; and Domestic Work (Graywolf, 2000). She is the recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Study Center, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Bunting Fellowship Program of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard. Her poems have appeared in such journals and anthologies as American Poetry Review, Callaloo, Kenyon Review, The Southern Review, New England Review, Gettysburg Review, and several volumes of Best American Poetry. At Emory University she is Professor of English and holds the Phillis Wheatley Distinguished Chair in Poetry.

Mon, Jun 27: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m.. Ray Gonzalez. Ray Gonzalez is the author of twelve books of poetry including Faith Run (University of Arizona Press, 2009), Cool Auditor: Prose Poems (BOA Editions, 2009) The Hawk Temple at Tierra Grande (2003 Minnesota Book Award for Poetry), and Consideration of the Guitar: New and Selected Poems (2005). Turtle Pictures (Arizona, 2000) received the 2001 Minnesota Book Award for Poetry. His poetry has appeared in the 1999, 2000, and 2003 editions of The Best American Poetry. He is Director of the MFA Creative Writing Program at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

Mon, July 25: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m.. Marie Howe. Marie Howe is the author of three volumes of poetry, The Kingdom of Ordinary Time (2008); The Good Thief (1998); and What the Living Do (1997), and is the co-editor of a book of essays, In the Company of My Solitude: American Writing from the AIDS Pandemic (1994). Stanley Kunitz selected Howe for a Lavan Younger Poets Prize from the American Academy of Poets. She has, in addition, been a fellow at the Bunting Institute at Radcliffe College and a recipient of NEA and Guggenheim fellowships. Her poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Poetry, Agni, Ploughsahres, Harvard Review, and The Partisan Review, among others. Currently, Howe teaches creative writing at Sarah Lawrence College, Columbia, and New York University.

Mon, Aug 22: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m.. Tim Seibles. Tim Seibles is the author of several poetry collections including, Hurdy-Gurdy, Hammerlock, and Buffalo Head Solos. He was the poet-in-residence at Bucknell University in Pennsylvania for the spring semester of 2010. Most recently, his poems were featured in the Cortland Review and Ploughshares. His work was also published in the newly released anthologies, Black Nature and Seriously Funny. His next collection, Fast Animal, will be released from Cleveland State University Press in spring 2011. He lives in Virginia where he teaches writing at Old Dominion University. He is also visiting faculty for the Stonecoast MFA program in Maine.

Thu, Sep 29: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m.. Patrizia Cavalli. Patrizia Cavalli was born in Todi, Umbria, and lives in Rome. Since 1974, she has published five volumes of poetry with Einaudi, including Sempre aperto teatro, 1999 (Theatre Always Open) which won the prestigious Premio Viareggio Repaci and Pigre divinità e pigra sorte, 2006 (Lazy Gods and Lazy Fate) for which she received the Premio Internazionale Pasolini. Bilingual editions of her poems have been published in France, Canada, Mexico, and Germany. She has contributed to numerous magazines and reviews, including Poetry and The New Yorker. Describing her work in The Vintage Book of Contemporary World Verse (1996), J.D. McClatchy observed “her style is hard-bitten, on the edge. The circumstances of a poem, although private, are never merely personal, they reach out to larger, more abiding and vulnerable realities.” Giorgio Agamben has characterized her verses as “a prosody…expressed in the most fluent, seamless, and colloquial language of 20th century Italian poetry.” Cavalli also has translated Moliere’s Amphytrion, Wilde’s Salome, Shakespeare’s The Tempest, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Othello.

Mon, Oct 3: Sherburne Memorial Library, 7:00 p.m..Killington Arts Guild’s A Gathering of Poets. This is always a lively group, usually about 15 poets reading for 2-3 minutes each, then repeating the order, reading for another 2-3 minutes. Refreshments.

Sat, Oct 15: Poetry Society of Vermont’s Annual Fall Meeting, Luncheon & Workshop. Location TBD. Info, http://www.poetrysocietyofvermont.org/.

Mon, Oct 17: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m.. D. A. Powell. D. A. Powell is the author of Tea, Lunch and Cocktails. His most recent collection, Chronic, was a finalist for the Publishing Triangle and the National Book Critics Circle Awards. Along with David Trinidad and a cast of hundreds, he is the co-author of By Myself: An Autobiography (Turtle Point, 2009). Powell’s honors have included fellowships from the Millay Colony, the National Endowment for the Arts and the James Michener Foundation, as well as a Pushcart Prize, the Lyric Poetry Award from the Poetry Society of America and an Academy of American Poets Prize. In 2010, he received the Kingsley Tufts Prize from Claremont University. D. A. Powell’s work appears in numerous anthologies, including Norton’s American Hybrids, Legitimate Dangers: Poets of the New Century and Best American Poetry 1998. His recent poems appear in Kenyon Review, Quarterly West, American Poetry Review, New England Review and Virginia Quarterly Review. Powell has taught at Columbia University, the University of Iowa’s Iowa Writers’ Workshop and New England College. A former Briggs-Copeland Lecturer in Poetry at Harvard University, he now teaches full-time in the English Department at University of San Francisco.

Mon, Dec 12: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m.. Cyrus Cassells. Cyrus Cassells is the author of four acclaimed books of poetry: The Mud Actor, Soul Make a Path through Shouting, Beautiful Signor, and More Than Peace and Cypresses. His fifth book, The Crossed-Out Swastika, and a translation manuscript, Still Life with Children: Selected Poems of Francesc Parcerisas, are forthcoming. Among his honors are a Lannan Literary Award, a William Carlos Williams Award, a Pushcart Prize, two NEA grants, and a Lambda Literary Award. He is a tenured Professor of English at Texas State University-San Marcos and has served on the faculty of Cave Canem, the African American Poets Workshop. He divides his time between Austin, New York City, and Paris, and works on occasion in Barcelona as a translator of Catalan poetry.

  • Again, if you become aware of an event that isn’t posted above, please let me know. My apologies if I have left off anything of importance to any of you, but it can always be corrected in the next Vermont Poetry Newsletter.

La poesía
es la ruptura instantánea
instantáneamente cicatrizada
abierta de nuevo
por la mirada de los otros

Poetry
is a sudden rupture
suddenly healed
and torn open again
by the glances of the others

Octavio Paz

“One of the obligations of the writer, and
perhaps especially of the poet, is
to say or sing all that he or she can,
to deal with as much of the world as
becomes possible to him or her in language.”

Denise Levertov

Your Fellow Poet,
Ron Lewis

The Queen City Review

 

http://www.burlington.edu/content/queen-city-review

The QCR is also on Facebook

 

Burlington College’s The Queen City Review is a yearly journal of art and literature and accepts the work of new and established writers and artists in the areas of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, memoir, photography, and fine art, as well as essays and criticism on all aspects of the aforementioned. They seek to publish high quality work that ranges 3) broadly in topic and genre.

 

The Queen City Review can be purchased by 2-year subscription or individually. The price of one issue is $8 plus shipping charges ($1) for a total of $9. Subscriptions can be purchased for $14 plus shipping charges ($2) and includes the Fall 2010 and upcoming 2011 issues. Copies can also be purchased in the Writing Center or at the front desk. They accept cash, check, and credit cards (Visa and Mastercard). You can mail your payment to them or by calling (802) 862-9616 ext. 234 to place your order over the phone. If mailing your payment, mail details to:

 

ATTN: Heidi Berkowitz Sadler

Faculty, Interdisciplinary Studies

Coordinator, The Writing Center

Editor, The Queen City Review

Burlington College

95 North Avenue

Burlington, VT 05401

 

If you have any further questions, you can contact Heidi at:

T: 802-862-9616

E: hsadler@burlington.edu

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2 responses

    • Thanks Scott. I checked out your website, scottegreen.com, but didn’t immediately find a link to your blog. Get me some more info and I will forward it to Ron Lewis. I can also write up a post about you and your site.

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