The Vermont Poetry Newsletter • December 2 2009

[The Vermont Poetry Newsletter is not issued by me but by Ron Lewis , by whose permission I post this. PLEASE NOTE : I have edited his newsletter so that links are provided rather than text.]

Vermont Poetry Newsletter

Your Poetry & Spoken Word Gateway in the Green Mountain State

December 2, 2009 – In This Issue:

  1. About VPN/How To Print
  2. Newsletter Editor’s Note
  3. Writing Assignments/Suggestions/Exercises/Prompts
  4. Kingdom Books Poetry Room Closing Dec 10th
  5. Two Heads: New Book by David Parkinson/Judith Dow Moore
  6. NH Writer’s Project Poetry Event Calendar
  7. The Mountain Review Literary Magazine
  8. The Pleasures of Translation & Writing Off The Bible: Misrashic Poetry
  9. The Politics of Poetry
  10. Brighten the Barn – PSOV Anthology
  11. 2009 NH Writer’s Handbook
  12. Interview with Poet Kevin Pilkington
  13. Stanley Kunitz on The Poet’s Relationship to the Poem
  14. Anne Sexton 10-Minute Video
  15. On Revision
  16. Poet Craig Arnold Passing
  17. Robert Frost Farm Fund
  18. Lost Poetry Quotations Web Site
  19. 2009-10 Poetry Out Loud Registered Schools To-Date
  20. The Recession Confession of a Poetry Shopaholic
  21. Bloodroot Literary Magazine Winners
  22. Boys & Girls Club of Rutland County 350 Syllables Project
  23. Did You Know? Poetry Foundation Has Launched an Online Poetry Learning Lab
  24. Ponderings – $10,000 Poetry Film Prize
  25. Poetry Quote – Christian Wiman
  26. US Poets Laureate List
  27. Failbetter Poem
  28. Linebreak Poem
  29. Copper Canyon Press Poem
  30. American Life in Poetry Poems
  31. League of Vermont Writers
  32. Vermont Poet Laureates
  33. Contact Info for Publisher of VPN: Ron Lewis
  34. Vermont Literary Journals
  35. State Poetry Society (PSOV)
  36. Year-Round Poetry Workshops in Vermont
  37. Other Poetry Workshops in Vermont
  38. Year-Round Poetry Writing Centers in Vermont
  39. Poetry Event Calendar

1.) About the Vermont Poetry Newsletter Network

The Vermont Poetry Newsletter Network is made up of people of all backgrounds, ages and skills who appreciate the craft of poetry and want to promote it in the beautiful state of Vermont. The network consists of a free e-mail list, an eventual web site, workshops, open mics, poetry performances and other literary events.  The network provides opportunities to meet local poets, talk about and enjoy poetry, and motivate and inspire yourself in whatever writing projects you are involved.

The mission of the Vermont Poetry Newsletter is to foster the poetry arts community in the Green Mountain State.  Its goals are to serve as a resource for and about VT poets; to support the development of individual poets; and to encourage an audience for poetry in Vermont.


2.) Newsletter Editor’s Note

Dear Friends of Poetry:

My apologies for such a long “intermission” between newsletters.  One thing led to another, to another, and so forth.  I always seem to bite off more than I can chew at one sitting, as those who know me, know well how I live my life.  I can at least tell you I was busy, and not laying prone somewhere.  I thank you for your patience.  Now, to get on with the Newsletter . . .

Ron Lewis
VPN Publisher
247-5913

3.) WRITING ASSIGNMENT/SUGGESTION/EXERCISES
CURRENT WRITING PROMPT:

Write a poem that requests an apology.

Perhaps you have an old poem that is feeling a little bad about itself.  It requests a change, or if it had been changed, it asks, “Why did you want to change me?  Wasn’t I good enough for you?”

While that poem is still alive within your recall, play with it, make it ask, no beg for an apology.  You know it will forgive you!  It knows that it’s nothing personal.

Exercise by Ron Lewis
Good Luck!

4.) Change Happens: Our Poetry Room Is Closing

After December 10, Kingdom Books intends to only provide mysteries (Dave Kanell’s area of expertise) — their Poetry Room is under contract to leave us, en masse. That means there is just about one week to browse and purchase from their poetry collection.

Yes, they’ll still offer poetry news and reviews. Beth Kanell, the force and passion behind the poetry collection, says life without poetry would be colorless for her.  She is certainly one of us! She expects that a few current books of poems may slip into their listings from time to time.

Beth wishes to tell us that it’s been great getting to know the poetry lovers who’ve enjoyed their collection of 2,400 books of contemporary poetry. Their (Beth and Dave Kanell) thanks to you all.

You can access their books from the web site, http://www.KingdomBks.com — just click on Browse & Buy and you will be within their listings at ABE Books, where they list all of their holdings. The Search function allows you to click Signed, to narrow the list; also place the word POETRY in the Keywords box.

Kingdom Books
283 East Village Road, Waterford VT 05819
802 751 8374
Kingdombks@aol.com

5. )

My good friends, David Parkinson and Judith Dow Moore, both fellow members of the Otter Creek Poets, have published a book together, entitled “Two Heads.”

To promote the book of friends may be a bit unfair to whom you’re promoting, but in this case, the fact that this book of verse is enlightening is a “no-brainer.”  I have been attending the meetings of the Otter Creek Poets for many years now, and find myself delighted to learn that either David or Judith has a new poem to share with the group.  That I have selected one poem for each friend, means nothing.  I could well have merely cracked open the book and pointed to any poem; they’re all very, very good.

The book is available at Carol’s Hungry Mind Café in Middlebury, or through RA Press, 100 Kennedy Drive #53, S. Burlington, VT 05403.

6.) It seems our friends in New Hampshire also have very active literary lives.  If you’re interested in literary (not necessarily poetry) readings in the Granite State, then bookmark this web address: http://www.nhwritersproject.org/newfiles/calendar.html

7.) The Mountain Review

Colchester High School’s English Department has been publishing an interesting literary magazine: The Mountain Review.  The Mountain Review is sponsored by the Vermont Council of Teachers of English Language Arts (VCTELA).  Generally, the mission is to publish work from Vermont students, K-12.  The Mountain Review has published poems, essays, short stories, excerpts from larger works, and art work.  Wayland Cole and Katie Lenox have been the editors for several years; both teach at Colchester.  Before them, Shelia Mable, a South Burlington teacher, was the editor for many years.

2009’s Mountain Review is over 100 pages long!  Why don’t more high schools publish literary magazines?  When I went to high school (1964-68), having a literary magazine was a given.  Working on your school’s literary magazine was an impressive line in a student’s resumé.  It would seem to me that publishing an annual literary magazine should be part and parcel of every English teacher’s job.  If I were lucky enough to be an English teacher, it would be something that I would both look forward and love to do each school year, working with the literary and arts-blessed student body.

My sincere congratulations to Colchester High School on this impressive publication!  It has a special place of honor in my poetry library.

Students at all Vermont schools can enter the competition to be published in the Mountain Review.  If you have questions, feel free to call them at (802) 264-5700 or email at colew@csdvt.org or lenoxk@csdvt.org.  Send orders for copies of The Mountain Review to Katie Lenox at: Colchester High School, PO Box 900, Colchester, VT 05446.  Send $5 per book; $2 postage to ship 1-3 books.  Checks payable to the VCTELA.

8.) The Pleasures of Translation
By J. Kates

WHAT DO YOU WRITE when you’re not writing?  Many writers practice exercises like freewriting or journal keeping, which turn them in on themselves. Others turn away from the writing desk completely and bake a cake or walk in the woods. I turn to the rest of the world. When I’m not writing my own poems, I reach as far as I can around the globe and grab what I can catch. I translate poems from other languages…. {Click on image at right to read complete article.]

Also in the NH Writer Newsletter:

Writing Off the Bible: Misrashic Poetry
by Jeff Friedman

PASSED DOWN ORALLY from generation to generation, midrashic commentaries on the Bible were first collected in written form in the Talmud in the fifth century. According to the ancient rabbis, midrash derives its sacred power from the belief that God not only dictated the Torah to Moses during the day but also explained it to him at night. These oral explanations are believed to constitute a second Torah, an oral Torah. Through midrashic commentary, the rabbis investigate or search the Bible to uncover the deeper meaning of the text. The rabbis interpret what God intended through the words of scripture. The purpose of creating midrash is to keep scripture alive and vital in the present….

9.) The Politics of Poetry
BY DAVID ORR
Shortly before Ohio’s Democratic primary, Tom Buffenbarger, the head of the machinists’ union and a supporter of Hillary Clinton, took to the stage at a Clinton rally in Youngstown to lay the wood to Barack Obama. “Give me a break!” snarled Buffenbarger, “I’ve got news for all the latte-drinking, Prius-driving, Birkenstock-wearing, trust fund babies crowding in to hear him speak! This guy won’t last a round against the Republican attack machine.” And then the union rep delivered his coup de grace: “He’s a poet, not a fighter!”

Ouch.

Fortunately, this insult to the sacred mysteries of Poesie didn’t go unanswered(….)

10.) Brighten the Barn

60th Anniversary Anthology
Poetry Society of Vermont

Forget that I’m the Reporting Secretary of the PSOV, I believe this book, all 99 pages of it, is a poetry bargain!  I have several issues in my possession, and if you’d like to have one or more issues, please send me $10 per copy, and I’ll get it out to you; I’ll even swallow the cost of postage!  This is a book that every Vermont poet should have in their library, in support of their own state poetry society, the PSOV.

11.) The New Hampshire Writer’s Project has a new publication out, and if you live in NH, you should invest $14 into this booklet. 2009 NH Writer’s Handbook is a vital resource for Granite State writers. This 30 page booklet includes more than 400 listings covering information about conferences, retreats, directories of publishers and agents, young writers’ resources, and many other topics.  This new edition, published June 2009, also includes five articles about the business of writing, from creating your own Web site to promoting your book, and more.

12.) Exclusive Interview With Poet Kevin Pilkington

Like so many good poets, Kevin Pilkington also teaches writing–in his case, he’s a member of the writing faculty at Sarah Lawrence College and teaches a workshop in the graduate department at Manhattanville College. But he doesn’t consider teaching a means to an end. “I feel fortunate that I have always enjoyed teaching,” says Pilkington. “It’s something I do and not just something else I do besides write. I’ve been teaching writing workshops for most of my adult life and haven’t lost my enthusiasm for being in a classroom.”
After interviewing him, it’s easy to see Pilkington’s not just trying to say the right things. His writing informs his teaching, and his teaching informs his writing. And to great effect–he’s the author of five collections, including Spare Change, the La Jolla Poets Press National Book Award winner, and Ready to Eat the Sky (River City Publishing), a finalist for an Independent Publishers Book Award. A new chapbook, St. Andrew’s Head, was published by Camber Press. Over the years, he’s been nominated for four Pushcarts and has appeared in Verse Daily. His poems and reviews have appeared in numerous magazines, including Poetry, Ploughshares, Iowa Review, Boston Review, Yankee, Hayden’s Ferry, etc. (…)

13.) Stanley Kunitz on the Poet’s Relationship to the Poem

“After a certain period, the poem seems to have no maker at all. Poems gather their own momentum and you feel they’re moving on their own. You are part of the world in which they are born and come to maturity, but they have an identity beyond the person to whom they are confiding because the poem doesn’t really belong to anyone, it belongs to a great tradition. The great tradition includes what I think of as the essential spirit of the poem, which belongs to centuries, and not to any single moment in time.

“You cannot know completely what your obligation is in writing the poem. The primary responsibility is to speak the true word and to distill the complexity of sensitivity that enters into any human experience.

“The poem becomes a vehicle of this so-called persona or soul, whatever you want to call it; it is a crystallization of your unconscious life. It carries a big load!

“The poet doesn’t so much disappear into the poem as become the poem. It is a concentration of faculties, of everything you are or hope to be, and at that moment you have a focus not only on your conscious life, but your unconscious world, and it is as much an expression of your whole being as is conceivable.” —From The Wild Braid: A Poet Reflects on a Century in the Garden by Stanley Kunitz with Genine Lentine (W.W. Norton, 2005)

(Taken from a blog post by poet Edward Byrne)

14.) Anne Sexton

I live the wrong life for the person I am. —Anne Sexton

I am 36, fairly attractive, a mother, two girls are 10 and 12, a husband in the wool business. I live nine miles outside of Boston. I do not live a poet’s life. I look and act like a housewife. My daughter says to her friends “a mother is someone who types all day.” But still I cook. But still my desk is a mess of letters to be answered and poems that want to tear their way out of my soul and onto the typewriter keys. At that point I am a lousy cook, a lousy wife, a lousy mother, because I am too busy wrestling with the poem to remember that I am a normal (?) American housewife. (…)

15.) On Revision

I haven’t been writing many new poems lately, but doing a lot of revising.

I was talking with someone last night and she said that many times women revise more than men. Men will be more happy with what they originally come up with, where women will want to tweak things more and change things. I do have male poets who write like that, but a couple of guy friends does not make a rule, so I wanted to talk about how true this is.

I’m a crazy revisionist, so I can only speak for myself (and not other women, and esp. not men), so just curious, if you’re a man, how much time do you give to the revision process and when you finish a first draft, are you pretty much happy with what you have? And to the women–how often when you finish a first draft do you consider it done? (…)

16.) ‘There Will Be No More Poems From Him’
By DAVID ORR
Associated Press/Ausable Press, Amanda Abel

Craig Arnold

The poet Craig Arnold, who has been missing since May 2, is presumed dead. His family and friends have been attempting to reclaim his body from a ravine on the volcanic island he’d been exploring; if you’re interested in assisting with this effort, please visit the Facebook group devoted to this effort for updates.
Many people in the poetry world knew Arnold personally, but even those who didn’t will feel the sense of loss that comes from realizing, as the poet C. Dale Young recently put it, “there will be no more poems from him.” (….)

Frost Farm Fund17.)

Robert Frost Farm Fund

College establishes Frost-related funds 
to maintain farm, support writer in residence.

18.) Lost Poetry Quotations

In search of a long lost poem? Remember only a fragment? Post here!

Registering is something you must do before posting your request, or helping someone with their request.

Here’s an example of what can go on with a post; this makes for very interesting discussions or “threads.”

19.) Vermont 2009-10

POETRY OUT LOUD
Registered Schools to Date 11-09-09

Arlington Memorial High School
Bellows Free Academy, St. Albans
BFA, Fairfax
Brattleboro UHS
Burr & Burton Academy, Manchester
Cabot School
Champlain Valley UHS, Hinesburg
East Burke School
Fair Haven UHS
Green Mountain UHS, Chester
Hazen UHS, Hardwick
Lake Region UHS, Orleans
Leland & Gray UHS, Townshend
Lyndon Institute
Mill River UHS, North Clarendon
Milton HS
Montpelier HS
Mount Abraham, Bristol
Mount Anthony UHS, Bennington
Mount Mansfield UHS, Jericho
North Country UHS
Northfield HS
Otter Valley UHS, Brandon
Oxbow UHS, Bradford
Peoples Academy, Morrisville
Proctor HS
Randolph UHS
Rice Memorial HS, South Burlington
Rochester HS
Saint Johnsbury Academy
South Burlington HS
Spaulding HS, Barre
The Sharon Academy
Twin Valley HS, Wilmington
U-32 UHS, Montpelier
Williamstown HS
Woodstock UHS

20.) Absolute Necessities
The recession confession of a poetry shopaholic.
BY JEFF GORDINIER

In Port Angeles, Washington, it was Tess Gallagher.
I had stopped for a lunch of yogurt and fresh figs on the way to the coast, and, as so often happens, I wound up wandering into a local bookstore. This one was Port Book & News on First Street, and by the time I’d left, about five minutes later, the frayed strap of my shoulder bag was straining with the weight of three extra volumes: Gallagher’s Amplitude: New and Selected Poems, Moon Crossing Bridge, and Instructions to the Double.
Two days later, at the Elliott Bay Book Company in Seattle, it was Kim Addonizio’s What Is This Thing Called Love and Yusef Komunyakaa’s Dien Cai Dau. I had a flight back to New York the next morning, and by now my carry-on bag had become an instrument of vertebrae-crunching torture. I could tell that the march through the Delta terminal at Sea-Tac was going to be brutal. But that’s how it is when I travel, and I travel a lot. (….)

21.) BLOODROOT LITERARY MAGAZINE

Here’s the list of the contest winners in the 2010 (3rd edition) of Bloodroot:

1st place David A. Sullivan    Santa Cruz,CA
2nd place Danny Dover          Bethel, VT
3rd place Regina Brault         Burlington, VT

3 Honorable Mentions (in alphabetical order):

Scott Atkins        Stowe, VT
Eileen Malone     Broadmoor Village, CA
Ivy Schweitzer    Norwich, VT

Congratulations to everyone!

22.) The Boys & Girls Club of Rutland County is having a 350 Syllables Project.  If you drive by their building on Merchants Row in downtown Rutland, you’ll notice that the windows are covered with haikus. Staff worked with the club members (as young as 6 years old) on explaining the haiku form of 5/7/5 syllables and the connection with nature/environment.  Some of the kids really enjoyed writing the haiku, and wrote more than one.

I was provided 3 photos of this display, but since they took so long for me to open, I thought of our several poets who receive this Newsletter who are still on dial up – and it would have taken them several minutes to open each of these pictures, so I decided against displaying them here (my apologies to Linda MacFarlane).  I am trying my best to keep the VPN as image-free as possible, so that it can open easily for all of its readers.  If you’re really that interested, then please drive by their building and see the windows for yourself.

23.) Did You Know?
The Poetry Foundation has Launched an online Poetry Learning Lab?

New educational, media-rich poetry experience for teachers and students

CHICAGO — The Poetry Foundation invites teachers and students to tap into its new online resource, the Poetry Learning Lab. Hosted on http://www.poetryfoundation.org, the Poetry Learning Lab is designed for anyone who wants to learn more about poetry.

A dynamic resource for teachers, students, and learners of every age, the Poetry Learning Lab has been developed by the Poetry Foundation in conjunction with a team of education experts—including writing and literature teachers, librarians, and poets—to provide an immersive educational experience with poetry. (….)

24.) Ponderings – $10,000 Poetry Film Prize

The Poetry Foundation and Facets Multi-Media are proud to announce that Fear of Snakes, by filmmaker Andreas Mendritzki, is the winner of the second annual Poetry Film Prize. The prize awards $10,000 to a filmmaker whose use of verse in film opens new artistic vistas and inspires children to appreciate poetry.

Mendritzki’s film is based on the poem of the same name by Canadian poet Lorna Crozier. Unique to the field of poetry as well as to the film industry, the Poetry Film Prize celebrates the best film based on a poem or poet while also recognizing excellence in language and cinematography. Jury-selected from among more than 90 entrants, the award was presented on Sunday, November 1, at the closing night ceremony of the 26th Annual Chicago International Children’s Film Festival (CICFF). (…)

25.) “Let us remember that in the end we go to poetry for one reason, so that we might more fully inhabit our lives and the world in which we live them, and that if we more fully inhabit these things, we might be less apt to destroy both.”

Poetry Quote by Christian Wiman,
Editor, Poetry

26.) Poets Laureate of the U.S.A.

  • A Net-annotated list of all the poets who have served the Library of Congress as Consultant (the old title) or Poet Laureate Consultant (the new title). Biographies & general reference sites are linked to the poets’ names — for the recent Laureates these are our own poet profiles with book-buying links at the bottom. Many of the other linked biographies are pages from the Academy of American Poets’ Find a Poet archive, a growing & invaluable resource. If there is no general information site about the poet, we have searched the Net for sample poems or other writings or recordings & listed those below the poet’s name.

27.) Failbetter

Coconut
Natalie Shapero

Quit saying let’s get curry. Don’t you know
I don’t eat coconut? I have to watch
my waistline, and besides, there’s always the chance
of shipwreck, scuba honeymoon gone sour (….)

28.) LineBreak

Moravia
Nick McRae

In this city whose name you can’t pronounce —
where women pace barefoot in dry grass and rusting
bottle caps, sandals in hands, skirts trailing for days;
where old men pack grocery aisles, tens of them, alone (….)


29.) Copper Canyon Press

Volver/To Go Back…
Esther Allen

To go back to the distant country,
to go back to the forgotten country,
secretly deformed
by exile in this land (…)

30.)

American Life in Poetry: Column 238

Though some teacher may have made you think that all poetry is deadly serious, chock full of coded meanings and obscure symbols, poems, like other works of art, can be delightfully playful. Here Bruce Guernsey, who divides his time between Illinois and Maine, plays with a common yam.

Yam
Bruce Guernsey

The potato that ate all its carrots,
can see in the dark like a mole,
its eyes the scars
from centuries of shovels, tines (…)

American Life in Poetry: Column 240

We haven’t shown you many poems in which the poet enters another person and speaks through him or her, but it is, of course, an effective and respected way of writing. Here Philip Memmer of Deansboro, N.Y., enters the persona of a young woman having an unpleasant experience with a blind date.

The Paleontologist’s Blind Date
Philip Memmer

You have such lovely bones, he says,
holding my face in his hands,
and although I can almost feel
the stone and the sand
sifting away, his fingers
like the softest of brushes (…)

American Life in Poetry: Column 241

I love poems in which the central metaphors are fresh and original, and here’s a marvelous, coiny description of autumn by Elizabeth Klise von Zerneck, who lives in Illinois.

Like Coins, November
Elizabeth Klise von Zerneck

We drove past late fall fields as flat and cold
as sheets of tin and, in the distance, trees

were tossed like coins against the sky. Stunned gold
and bronze, oaks, maples stood in twos and threes:

some copper bright, a few dull brown and, now
and then, the shock of one so steeled with frost

American Life in Poetry: Column 242

There are lots of poems in which a poet expresses belated appreciation for a parent, and if you don’t know Robert Hayden’s poem, “Those Winter Sundays,” you ought to look it up sometime. In this lovely sonnet, Kathy Mangan, of Maryland, contributes to that respected tradition.

The Whistle
Robert Hayden

You could whistle me home from anywhere
in the neighborhood; avenues away,
I’d pick out your clear, alternating pair
of notes, the signal to quit my child’s play
and run back to our house for supper,
or a Saturday trip to the hardware store.(….)

31.) League of Vermont Writers

Annual Meeting – DoubleTree Hotel, South Burlington
Saturday, January 23, 2010
with Tim Brooks, David Dobbs and more

Information and registration coming soon.

32.) VERMONT POET LAUREATES

1) Robert Frost – 1961
2) Galway Kinnell
3) Louis Glück
4) Ellen Bryant Voigt
5) Grace Paley
6) Ruth Stone

33.) If you ever have a need to contact me, here’s how to go about doing so:

Ronald Lewis:
Phone: 802-247-5913
Cell: 802-779-5913
Home: 1211 Forest Dale Road, Brandon, VT 05733
Email: vtpoet@gmail.com

34.)

VERMONT LITERARY JOURNALS

1) The Queen City Review

Burlington College’s  The Queen City Review is a yearly journal of art and literature and accepts the work of new and established writers and artists in the areas of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, memoir, photography, and fine art, as well as essays and criticism on all aspects of the aforementioned. They seek to publish high quality work that ranges broadly in topic and genre.

The Queen City Review can be purchased by 2-year subscription or individually.  The price of one issue is $8 plus shipping charges ($1) for a total of $9.  Subscriptions can be purchased for #$14 plus shipping charges $2) and includes the Fall 2008 and upcoming 2009 issues.  They accept cash, check, and credit cards.  You can mail your payment to them or by calling (802) 862-9616 ext. 234 to place your order over the phone.  If mailing your payment, mail details to:

ATTN: Heidi Berkowitz
Burlington College
95 North Avenue
Burlington, VT  05401

2) Bloodroot

Bloodroot is a nonprofit literary magazine dedicated to publishing diverse voices through the adventure of poetry, short fiction, and creative nonfiction.  Their aim is to provide a platform for the free-spirited emerging and established writer.

The price of a single issue is $8.

Editor, “Do” Roberts
Bloodroot Literary Magazine
PO Box 322
Thetford Center, VT  05075
(802) 785-4916
email: bloodroot@wildblue.net

3) New England Review

A publication of Middlebury College, a high quality literary magazine that continues to uphold its reputation for publishing extraordinary, enduring work.  NER has been publishing now for over 30 years.

Cost: $8 for a single issue
$30 for a single year (4 issues)
$50 for two years (8 issues)

New England Review
Attn: Orders
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753

NEReview@middlebury.edu
(800) 450-9571

4) Willard & Maple

A Literary and Fine Art Magazine of Champlain College, Burlington.

Willard & Maple
163 South Willard Street
Freeman 302, Box 34
Burlington, VT  05401

email: willardandmaple@champlain.edu

Vermont Literary Review5) Vermont Literary Review

A Literary and Fine Art Magazine of Castleton State College, Castleton.

The first issue of Vermont Literary Review was published in 1994. The review is published once a year. Work featured in the review includes poetry, fiction, drama, and personal essays from and about New England.

From its inception until 2006, students and professors reviewed the work submitted and selected work to be published. They used to jointly edit and design the review as well. After a brief lapse, the Vermont Literary Review has resumed publication in 2008 as a journal edited and designed solely by English Department faculty. The Literary Club, which used to help create this journal, is now putting out a publication of student work. (….)

Green Mountains Review6) Green Mountains Review

A Literary and Fine Art Magazine of Johnson State College, Johnson; in publication since 1987.

The Green Mountains Review is an international journal publishing poems, stories, and creative nonfiction by both well-known authors and promising newcomers.  The magazine also features interviews, literary criticism, and book reviews.  Neil Shepard is the general editor and poetry editor of the Green Mountains Review.  The fiction editor is Leslie Daniels.

The editors are open to a wide range of styles and subject matter. If you would like to acquaint yourself with some of the work that we have accepted in the past, then we encourage you to order some of our back issues (….)

7) Burlington Poetry Journal

The Burlington Poetry Journal is a new nonprofit publication interested in creating a means for provoking opinions, ideas, and thoughtful responses for poets in the Greater Burlington area. While there are numerous outlets for writers to gather and share privately in Vermont, there is no publication that brings together poetry of all styles and writers of all ages for the enjoyment of the general public. It is our hope that this journal will inspire writers to share their work with others who may be unaware of their talent, and for those who have never considered themselves writers to try their hand at poetry. We invite you to submit your work and share with others your thoughts and abilities with the Burlington community. The work you share will produce a dialogue as writers become aware of each other and begin to expose themselves and others to new poetry. The eclectic nature of the Burlington Poetry Journal will serve to stimulate its readers and authors.

8) Tarpaulin Sky

Founded in 2002 as an online literary journal, Tarpaulin Sky took the form of 12.5 internet issues (see the archive) before its first paper edition in November 2007. The magazine continues to publish new work both online and in print, often curated by guest-editors.

Tarpaulin Sky focuses on cross-genre / trans-genre / hybrid forms as well as innovative poetry and prose. The journal emphasizes experiments with language and form, but holds no allegiance to any one style or school or network of writers (….)

9) The Mountain Review

Colchester High School’s English Department has been publishing an interesting literary magazine: The Mountain Review.  The Mountain Review is sponsored by the Vermont Council of Teachers of English Language Arts (VCTELA).  Generally, the mission is to publish work from Vermont students, K-12.  The Mountain Review has published poems, essays, short stories, excerpts from larger works, and art work.  Wayland Cole and Katie Lenox have been the editors for several years; both teach at Colchester.  Before them, Shelia Mable, a South Burlington teacher, was the editor for many years.

2009’s Mountain Review is over 100 pages long!

Students at all Vermont schools can enter the competition to be published in the Mountain Review.  If you have questions, feel free to call them at (802) 264-5700 or email at colew@csdvt.org or lenoxk@csdvt.org.  Send orders for copies of The Mountain Review to Katie Lenox at: Colchester High School, PO Box 900, Colchester, VT 05446.  Send $5 per book; $2 postage to ship 1-3 books.  Checks payable to the VCTELA.

Poetry Society of Vermont35.) STATE POETRY SOCIETY
Poetry Society of Vermont

The Poetry Society of Vermont, founded in 1947, is an association of poets and supporters who join in promoting an interest in poetry through meetings, workshops, readings, contests, and contributions to the society’s chapbook. Anyone may join the society including high school and college students and non-residents of Vermont. We welcome both writers and appreciative readers.

In September 2007, The Poetry Society of Vermont will celebrated its 60th Anniversary. (….)

36.)

YEAR-ROUND POETRY WORKSHOPS IN VERMONT

BELLOWS FALLS

1) Great River Arts Institute – See details elsewhere in this newsletter

2) Poetry Workshop at Village Square Booksellers with Jim Fowler (no relation to owner Pat).  The goal of this course is to introduce more people to the art of writing poetry and will include a discussion of modern poetry in various forms and styles. Each week, the course will provide time to share and discuss participant’s poetry. Poetry Workshops on Monday mornings (9:30-12:30 I believe)- Jim Fowler’s sessions continue, with periodic break for a few weeks between sessions.  Students should bring a poem and copies to the first class. The course will be limited to 5 to 8 students to allow adequate time to go through everyone’s poetry contributions and will meet in the cafe at Village Square Booksellers. James Fowler, of Charlestown, New Hampshire, has a Masters Degree in Environmental Science with a major in Nature Writing. He was the editor of Heartbeat of New England, a poetry anthology. Fowler has been widely published since 1998 in such journals as Connecticut Review, Quarterly of Light Verse, and Larcom Review. Fowler is a founding member of the *River Voices Writer’s Circle*, and a regular reader at Village Square Booksellers-River Voices Poetry Readings. The fee for this 6 week Workshop is $100, payable to Mr. Fowler at the first class. Pre-registration for the Poetry Workshop is suggested and may be made by calling Village Square Booksellers at 802-463-9404 or by email at vsbooks@sover.net or  jfowler177@comcast.net. <vsbooks@sover.net>

3) InkBlot Complex Poetry Workshop runs through the Vermont Independent Media’s Media Mentoring Project and is held at the Rockingham Public Library at 65 Westminster Street in Bellows Falls.  No previous writing or journalism experience or even class attendance is required.  Participants are invited to bring a project or share successful techniques.  The workshop aims to lift poetry from the page and reveal how it is a living force in daily life.  Originally taught at the University of Illinois at Chicago to great acclaim, its interactive nature and inclusion of multiple art forms leaves dry, academic notions of poetry behind.  It functions through three tenets: 1) Presentation of the art form as a living element of our daily world, 2) individualized, personal enrichment and free range of expression for each student, and 3) artistic ecultivation through unexpected means.  Taught by seasoned arts journalist, cultural critic and poet Clara Rose Thornton, this free event explores the poetry we encounter all around us – in songs we hear, the ways we express ourselves, even the advertisements we see.  In the final session students then create their own works with an increased sense of connection to the way words construct meaning.  All materials are provided.  Instructor Clara Rose Thornton is an internationally published film, wine and visual arts critic, music journalist, poet and former book and magazine editor.  Her writings on culture and the arts have appeared nationally in Stop Smiling: The Magazine for High-Minded Lowlifes, Honest Tune: The American Journal of Jam and Time Out Chicago.  Currently residing in an artists’ colony in Windham County, she acts as the biweekly arts columnist for the Rutland herald, staff writer for Southern Vermont Arts && Living and a regular contributor to The Commons.  A portfolio, bio and roster of writing and editing services can be found at http://www.clararosethornton.com.  For more information about the Media Mentoring Project, visit http://www.commonsnews.org or call 246-6397.  You can also write to Vermont Independent Media at P.O. Box 1212, Brattleboro, VT 05302.

BERLIN

The Wayside Poets, who share their poetry publicly from time to time, have been meeting irregularly for the past 25 years.  They used to be called The Academy Street Poets.  Membership is by invitation only.  They meet now at the Wayside Restaurant & Bakery in Berlin.  Members include Diane Swan, Sherry Olson, Carol Henrikson and Sarah Hooker.  You can contact them through Sherry Olson at: solsonvt@aol.com or 454-8026.

BURLINGTON

The Burlington Poets Society, a group of “stanza scribblers” that express their love of verse, made up of UVM students and professors, have recently organized, meeting at the Fleming Museum at UVM in Burlington for their periodic “The Painted Word” series of poetry readings. I hope to have additional information on this group in the coming months.

GUILFORD

The Guilford Poets Guild, formed in 1998, meets twice a month to critique and support each other’s work.  Their series of sponsored readings by well-known poets which began at the Dudley Farm, continues now at the Women and Family Life Center.

MIDDLEBURY

The Otter Creek Poets offer a poetry workshop every Thursday afternoon, from 1:00 to 3:00 in the basement meeting room of the Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main Street, Middlebury.  This workshop, the largest and oldest of its kind in the state, has been meeting weekly for 13 years.  Poets of all ages and styles come for peer feedback, encouragement, and optional weekly assignments to get the poetry flowing.  Bring a poem or two to share (plus 20 copies).  The workshops are led by David Weinstock.  There is considerable parking available behind the library, or further down the hill below that parking lot.  For more information, call David at 388-6939 or Ron Lewis at 247-5913.

NORWICH

This group meets on the first Sunday of every month at the Norwich Library, 6:30 p.m.

STOWE

There is another poetry workshop happening in Stowe, but unfortunately I know nothing much about this group.  If you do, contact me!

WAITSFIELD

The Mad River Poets consists of a handful of poets from the Route 100 corridor.  More on this group in the future.

Divider

37.)

OTHER POETRY WORKSHOPS IN VERMONT

BURLINGTON

Scribes in the making put pen to paper as part of an open verse-writing session at the Fletcher Free Library, 235 College Street.  Three consecutive Thursdays, starting January 8, 2009, 5:00-6:00 p.m.  Free.  Contact information: 862-1094.

WHITE RIVER JUNCTION

The Writer’s Center
58 Main Street
White River Junction, Vermont

Instructor: April Ossmann (author of Anxious Music, Four Way Books, 2007, writing, editing and publishing consultant, and former Executive Director of Alice James Books)

Info: (802)333-9597 or aprilossmann@hotmail.com and http://www.aprilossmann.com

Inkblot Poetry WorkshopANYWHERE, VERMONT

Revived for the 2009 academic year is the InkBlot Complex Poetry Workshop, designed for upper-elementary and high-school-age students, grades 7-12. The curriculum functions through three tenets:

  • Innovative presentation of the art form as a living element of our daily world
  • Individualized, personal enrichment and free range of expression for each student
  • Artistic cultivation through unexpected means

The workshop debuted at the University of Illinois at Chicago, during a three-week summer program, entitled Project C.H.A.N.C.E., for underprivileged sophomore and senior students from area high schools. It was a fantastic success, and the program director requested its return. With this encouragement, I decided to expand and adapt the workshop for various age levels, as an educational/arts supplement for after-school programs and enrichment programs and an arts elective for more traditional academic settings. The response has been wonderful. (…)

38.)

YEAR-ROUND POETRY WRITING CENTERS IN VERMONT

BURLINGTON

The Burlington Writer’s Group (BWG) meets on Tuesday evenings from 7-9 PM and has a new home at the Unitarian Church in the church’s little white house off of Clark St., 2nd floor. They’d like to let people know and also invite anyone interested to join them whenever folks are in town or as often as they’d like.

The Burlington Writer’s Group is a free drop-in group. They decide on a prompt and write for 20 minutes, followed by a go-around reading. They can usually get in two writes depending on group size. All genres and experience levels are welcome and there really are no rules other than demonstrating courtest while people are writing (don’t interrupt).  They don’t do much critiquing though some spontaneous reactions occur. Mainly it’s good practice to just show up and write for 40 minutes and share the writing, if so inclined…

BURLINGTON

Women Writing for (a) Change supports the authentic experience of women who honor themselves through creative writing.  Our community supports reflection as we move into our questions and awaken to change.  Participants enhance expressive skills, strengthen their voices, deepen themselves as women as writers for positive change in all spheres of life.  Creative writing in all genres is our shared vehicle.  Women Writing for (a) Change is for women who, 1) dream of writing for self-discovery, for personal or social healing, 2) hunger for creative process in their lives, 3) yearn to explore their feminine voice, 4) crave reflective, space, and 5) are in transition.  For more information, go to their web site or contact Sarah Bartlett at either 899-3772 or sarah@womenwritingvt.com.

SPRINGFIELD

A Writer’s Group has started to meet at the Springfield Town Library on the fourth Monday of each month, from 7 to 8 pm.  For more information, call 885-3108.

WHITE RIVER JUNCTION

The Writer’s Center is for serious writers and nervous beginners. It’s for procrastinators who could benefit from regular deadlines – and for the prolific who could benefit from quality feedback. It’s for anyone with a manuscript hidden in a drawer, or a life story or poem waiting to be written. It’s for people who don’t know where to start or how to end. And for writers who are doing just fine on their own, but would like the company of other writers.  The Writer’s Center is for anyone who is writing or wants to write.  One of the Center’s consultants is April Ossman ( http://www.aprilossmann.com).  Founded by Joni B. Cole and Sarah Stewart Taylor, the Writer’s Center offers instruction and inspiration through a selection of workshops, discussions, and community. We would love to see you – and your writing – at The Writer’s Center!

SPRINGFIELD

A Writer’s Group has started to meet at the Springfield Town Library on the fourth Monday of each month, from 7 to 8 pm.  For more information, call 885-3108.

39.)

POETRY EVENT CALENDAR

Below please find the most current list of poetry happenings in Vermont for the near future.  Please be aware that these events can be found on Poetz.com, but there is usually additional information that is typed here that would be cumbersome to place on Poetz.com.  Please note all events are Vermont-based unless they are of extreme importance or happen to lie just outside our borders.  If you would like to save on paper and ink, please just highlight what you need, or perhaps only events for the coming month, and print that information.  All events are advertised as free unless indicated otherwise.

Wed, Dec 9: Norwich Bookstore, 291 Main Street, Norwich, 7:00 p.m. Special Celebration Honoring Grace Paley. A special celebration of the life and writing of our dear friend…

Grace Paley was born on December 11, 1922 and we mark the date with readings of her poetry and stories. Grace gave much to our community and the society at large with her powerful use of words. She was wise and witty, tough and gentle, humble and strong – all at the same time.

Come hear a selection of her work read by members of her family and a few chosen friends.

(Reservations recommended.)  For info, 649-1114, Penny at penny@norwichbookstore.com.

Wed, Dec 9:  Jaquith Public Library, Old Schoolhouse Common, School Street, Marshfield, 7:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Poetry Reading with Robert and Charles Baraschh. Robert’s collection, Aging Gracefully, inspired one reviewer to write: “Not only does he possess the gift of understanding human beings, he possesses an old man’s wise mind, a young man’s enthusiasm for life, and a mighty pen.” Charles’s book, Dreams of the Presidents, contains 42 poems, each one a dream a U.S. president might have had. The book has received wide critical acclaim and has been described as “a brilliant concoction” and “surreal, funny, and even poignant”.  For info, Susan Green at 426-3581 or http://www.marshfield.lib.vt.us.

Thu, Dec 10: Briggs-Carriage Bookstore, 16 Park Street, Brandon, 7:00 p.m.  Open Mic. Come join us at the Ball and Chain Cafe and share your poetry and stories!  For info, 247-0050.

Fri, Dec 11:  Book King, 21 Center Street, Rutland, 5:30 p.m.  Poet Tom Smith.  Tom will be giving a reading from his new book, The Christmas Shopper, which won the 2009 A.E. Coppard Prize for a long story.  The small book is about a shopper who is on a quest to find presents for his family and in the process, explores the human condition through his many encounters.  Tom has been a teacher at Castleton State College and has published poetry and fiction since 1959.  He is also an actor and appeared in many roles in summer stock and has given readings throughout Vermont and the rest of the country.  This reading is part of Downtown Rutland’s Art Hop activities, and although not a true poetry reading, a chance to meet with the poet and perhaps get your Tom Smith poetry books signed by the illusive poet.

Sat, Dec 12: Village Square Booksellers, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, In the Café, 2:00p.m. – 4:00 p.m.  Open Mic River Voices Poetry Reading on the second Saturday of each month.  The session is usually open mic: hear local poets from the River Voices Writing Group, or bring your own original work to share or read from a favorite poet, or just come as a listener.  Sessions might be Open Mic Sessions, or Readings by published authors. The tables in the cafe are gathered together as each member of the group takes a turn reading poetry aloud in a fun environment.  Light refreshments are served.  To reserve a place at the table, e-mail vsbooks@sover.net or call (802) 463-9404.

Sat, Dec 12: Castleton Free Library, 638 Main Street, Castleton, 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.  Reading and Book Signing: Tom Smith. Tom Smith, long time professor at Castleton State College who has been publishing poetry and fiction since 1959, won the 2008 Long Story Contest, International and the 2009 A.E. Coppard Prize for Fiction for his novella, The Christmas Shopper. He will read excerpts, answer questions and sign copies of his book. Refreshments after the reading.  (See Dec 11th event for additional info.)  For info, Meg at 468-5574 or http://www.castletonfreelibrary.org.

Mon, Dec 14: Castleton Free Library, 638 Main Street, Castleton, 7:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.  Reading and Book Signing: Tom Smith. Tom Smith, long time professor at Castleton State College who has been publishing poetry and fiction since 1959, won the 2008 Long Story Contest, International and the 2009 A.E. Coppard Prize for Fiction for his novella, The Christmas Shopper. He will read excerpts, answer questions and sign copies of his book. Refreshments after the reading.  (See Dec 11th event for additional info.)  For info, Meg at 468-5574 or http://www.castletonfreelibrary.org.

2010:

Sat, Jan 9: Village Square Booksellers, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, In the Café, 2:00p.m. – 4:00 p.m.  Open Mic River Voices Poetry Reading on the second Saturday of each month.  The session is usually open mic: hear local poets from the River Voices Writing Group, or bring your own original work to share or read from a favorite poet, or just come as a listener.  Sessions might be Open Mic Sessions, or Readings by published authors. The tables in the cafe are gathered together as each member of the group takes a turn reading poetry aloud in a fun environment.  Light refreshments are served.  To reserve a place at the table, e-mail vsbooks@sover.net or call (802) 463-9404.

Sat, Feb 13: Village Square Booksellers, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, In the Café, 2:00p.m. – 4:00 p.m.  Open Mic River Voices Poetry Reading on the second Saturday of each month.  The session is usually open mic: hear local poets from the River Voices Writing Group, or bring your own original work to share or read from a favorite poet, or just come as a listener.  Sessions might be Open Mic Sessions, or Readings by published authors. The tables in the cafe are gathered together as each member of the group takes a turn reading poetry aloud in a fun environment.  Light refreshments are served.  To reserve a place at the table, e-mail vsbooks@sover.net or call (802) 463-9404.

Mon, Feb 22: Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, 8:00 p.m.  Poet David Shapiro to read.  David Shapiro (born January 2, 1947) is an American poet, literary critic, and art historian and . Shapiro has written some twenty volumes of poetry, literary, and art criticism. He was first published at the age of thirteen, and his first book was published at the age of eighteen. Shapiro has taught at Columbia, Bard College, Cooper Union, Princeton University, and William Paterson University. He wrote the first monograph on John Ashbery, the first book on Jim Dine’s paintings, the first book on Piet Mondrian’s flower studies, and the first book on Jasper Johns’ drawings. He has translated Rafael Alberti’s poems on Pablo Picasso, and the writings of the Sonia and Robert Delaunay. Shapiro has won National Endowment for the HumanitiesNational Endowment for the Arts fellowships, been nominated for a National Book Award, and been the recipient of numerous grants for his work. Shapiro lives in Riverdale, The Bronx, New York City, with his wife and son.

Mar 6: Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier. State semi-finals and Vermont State Poetry Out Loud Final competition.  I will have more specific times later, but likely it will be morning semi-finals and an afternoon final. Each school will also be having a final competition at their school to choose the competitor to go on to the state semi-finals — many of these are open to the public.  I will pass on those dates as I receive them. (March 13 snow date).

Sat, Mar 13: Village Square Booksellers, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, In the Café, 2:00p.m. – 4:00 p.m.  Open Mic River Voices Poetry Reading on the second Saturday of each month.  The session is usually open mic: hear local poets from the River Voices Writing Group, or bring your own original work to share or read from a favorite poet, or just come as a listener.  Sessions might be Open Mic Sessions, or Readings by published authors. The tables in the cafe are gathered together as each member of the group takes a turn reading poetry aloud in a fun environment.  Light refreshments are served.  To reserve a place at the table, e-mail vsbooks@sover.net or call (802) 463-9404.

Thu, Apr 1: Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Poet Carol Frost.  Carol Frost, director of Winter with the Writers, A Festival of the Literary Arts at Rollins College, is the author of ten books of poems. The Queen’s Desertion, I Will Say Beauty, Love and Scorn: New and Selected Poems, all from Northwestern University Press, are her recent volumes. Her poems have appeared in four Pushcart Prize anthologies, and she has been a recipient of two National Endowment for the Arts fellowships. The Poets’ Prize and Elliston Award committees have also honored her work.

Mon, Apr 19: Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Poet Alice Notley.  Alice Notley is the author of more than twenty books of poetry including The Descent of Alette and Mysteries of Small Houses. She was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and winner of the L.A. Times Book Award for Poetry. In 2001, she received an award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the Poetry Society of America’s Shelly Memorial Award. Born in Arizona, Notley grew up in California. She was an important force in the eclectic second generation of the New York school of poetry.

Thu, May 13: Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, 8:00 p.m.  Poet Fanny Howe. Fanny Howe has written numerous books of poetry including Gone, (University of California Press, 2003), Selected Poems (UC Press, 2000), On the Ground (Graywolf Press, 2004), and The Lyrics (Graywolf, 2007). She has also written novels, five of them collected in one volume called Radical Love. At seventeen Howe left her home in Boston for California and has since spent her life there and in England, Ireland, and Massachusetts. In recent years she has won the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize, a fellowship from the Guggenheim Foundation, and an award from the Academy of Arts and Letters. She has written two collections of essays, The Wedding Dress (UC Press, 2003) and The Winter Sun (Graywolf, 2009). Howe has three grown children and six little grandchildren; she currently lives on Martha’s Vineyard.

Mon May 31: Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, 8:00 p.m.  Poet and writer Anne Waldman. Waldman has written more than 40 books, including the legendary Fast Speaking Woman, the innovative Marriage: A Sentence; and the meditative Structure of the World Compared to a Bubble. Her most recent is Manatee Humanity (2009), a hybrid-poem that explores the nuances of inter-species communication and compassion. It draws on animal lore and encounters, dreams, evolutionary biology, neuroscience, and Buddhist ritual. Outrider, a collection of poems, essays, and interviews, is a look at what poetry and the role of the poet can be. Waldman is cofounder, with Allen Ginsberg, of the celebrated Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at Naropa University. Recipient of many awards, she is the Artistic Director for Naropa’s Summer Writing Program, and teaches in New England College’s MFA program.

Mon, Jul 26: Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, 8:00 p.m.  Poet Marilyn Hacker.  Marilyn Hacker is the author of a dozen collections of poems, including ESSAYS ON DEPARTURE (Carcanet, 2006) , DESESPERANTO, (Norton, 2003) and WINTER NUMBERS which received the Lenore Marshall Award of the Academy of American Poets.  NAMES will be published by W.W. Norton in the fall of 2009. She has also published ten collections of translations from the French, including Marie Etienne’s KING OF A HUNDRED HORSEMEN (Farrar Strauss and Giroux 2008) which received the Robert Fagles Translation Prize and the 2009 PEN Award for Poetry in Translation. She was elected a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets in 2008.

Thu, Aug 5: Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Poet Arthur Sze.  Arthur Sze is the author of nine books of poetry, including The Ginkgo Light (2009), Quipu (2005), The Silk Dragon: Translations from the Chinese (2001), and The Redshifting Web: Poems 1970-1998 (1998), all from Copper Canyon Press. He is also the editor of Chinese Writers on Writing (forthcoming from Trinity University Press in 2010). His poems have been translated into Albanian, Bosnian, Chinese, Dutch, Italian, Romanian, Spanish, and Turkish. He is a professor emeritus at the Institute of American Indian Arts and lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, where he served, from 2006-2008, as the city’s first poet laureate.

Mon, Aug 23: Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Poet Carol Moldaw. Carol Moldaw’s lyric novel, The Widening, was published by Etruscan Press last spring. She is the author of four books of poetry, The Lightning Field (2003), which won the 2002 FIELD Poetry Prize, Through the Window (2000), Chalkmarks on Stone (1998), and Taken from the River (1993). A recipient of a Lannan Foundation Marfa Writer’s Residency, an NEA Creative Writing Fellowship, and a Pushcart Prize, Moldaw was born in Oakland, California, and lives outside of Santa Fe, New Mexico. So Late, So New: New and Selected Poems is forthcoming from Etruscan Press in 2010.

Thu, Sep 2: Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Poet Carl Phillips. Carl Phillips is the author of ten books of poetry, most recently Speak Low (FSG, 2009) and Quiver of Arrows: Selected Poems 1986-2006 (FSG, 2007).  His awards and honors include the Kingsley Tufts Award and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the Academy of American Poets, to which he was named a Chancellor in 2006.  He teaches at Washington University in St. Louis.

Mon, Sep 20: Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Poet Adam Zagajewski. Adam Zagajewski was born in Lvov in 1945, a largely Polish city that became a part of the Soviet Ukraine shortly after his birth. A major figure of the Polish New Wave literary movement of the early 1970s and of the anti-Communist Solidarity movement of the 1980s, Zagajewski is today one of the most well-known and highly regarded contemporary Polish poets in Europe and the United States. Zagajewski’s most recent books in English are Eternal Enemies (Farrar, Straus, & Giroux, 2008) and Without End: New and Selected Poems (2002), which was nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award. He is also the author of a book of essays and literary sketches, Two Cities: On Exile, History and the Imagination (1995), and Solidarity, Solitude: Essays. When, after September 11, The New Yorker published his poem, “Try to Praise the Mutilated World,” on its back page—a rare departure from the cartoons and parodies that usually occupy that space—it resonated with many readers. He now spends part of the year in Krakow, the city he lived in during the 1960s and ’70s; and he teaches in Chicago.

Thu, Sep 30: Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Poet Rikki Ducornet. Rikki Ducornet is the author of seven novels, three collections of short fictions including The One Marvelous Thing (Dalkey Archive 2008), a collection of essays and five books of poetry. She has received a Lannan Fellowship and a Lannan Literary Award for Fiction and an Academy Award from the American Adademy of Arts and Letters. Her paintings have been exhibited widely, most recently at the Museo de la Solidaridad in Santiago, Chile.

Thu, Nov 25: Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Poet Forrest Gander. A translator, essayist, and the editor of two anthologies of Mexican poetry, Gander is the author of more than a dozen books, including collaborations with notable artists and photographers. His many books include his first novel As A Friend (2008); the poetry collections Eye Against Eye (with photographs by Sally Mann), Torn Awake, and Science & Steepleflower; and the essay collection, Faithful Existence: Reading, Memory & Transcendence. Translations include Firefly Under the Tongue: Selected Poems of Coral Bracho and, with Kent Johnson, The Night by Jaime Saenz. Gander’s essays have appeared in many national magazines including The Nation, The Boston Review, and American Poetry Review. Gander is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Guggenheim, Howard, and Whiting Foundations, and he has received two Gertrude Stein Awards for Innovative Poetry. With poet C.D. Wright, Gander lives in Rhode Island, where he is professor of English and Comparative Literature at Brown University.

Mon, Dec 13: Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Poet Susan Mitchell. Susan Mitchell has won many awards for her poetry, including fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Lannan Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts.  She has authored three books, most recently Erotikon and Rapture, which won the Kingsley Tufts Book Award and was a National Book Award finalist.  Her poems have been published in The New Yorker, The Atlantic Monthly, The American Poetry Review, The Yale Review, and Fence, as well as in seven volumes of the Best American Poetry series, and have been awarded three Pushcart prizes.  Mitchell lives in Boca Raton, and teaches in the MFA Writing Program at Florida Atlantic University.

Again, if you become aware of an event that isn’t posted above, please let me know. My apologies if I have left off anything of importance to any of you, but it can always be corrected in the next Vermont Poetry Newsletter.

To have great poets
there must be great audiences too

❧ Whitman

Your fellow Poet,

Ron Lewis

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