Another Poet & Children’s Writer

Just noticed a new netizen blogger – Karin Gustafson. I like her for three reasons. First, she writes traditional poetry, which is to say, she tests herself against the disciplines of rhyme, meter and form.  Second, she writes children’s stories. Subway SonnetI do too. In fact, I have a Master’s Degree in Children’s Literature. So.. I really do like this art form. Third, she writes fun posts and has the same last name as a favorite high school teacher (way back when). Her latest post is Subway Sonnet (as of Sept. 24, 2009).

She dispenses with meter, but almost keeps to the rhyme scheme of the typical Shakespearean Sonnet. What she experiments with (which is why I say almost to the rhyme scheme) is the number of lines. She adds a fifteenth “half line” to the sonnet. It’s only nominally a “half line”, since there’s no meter in the poem. If she had written the poem using Iambic Pentameter, for example, a half line, conventionally, would be Iambic Trimeter. As it is, the sonnet could either be a modified Shakespearean Sonnet (both because of the extra line and because there’s no meter) or a nonce sonnet (which is simply what you refer to a poem whose form is unique to the poem and the poem’s author). Here are the last lines:

Today, I’m by the sea,
and water, vaster than pools, sparkles
under light so immense it cannot be
broken down for parts, yet its particles
raise up the non-molecular part
of me, what refuses to lose heart,
no matter–

The sonnets volta (which not all sonnets have) is her shift between yesterday and today, between observation and a sort of philosophical summing up. Also, check out her sonnet Post-Eden, it’s quite good. As with the sonnet above, she dispenses with meter, but unlike that sonnet she retains the rhyme scheme of the Shakespearean Sonnet (there’s no half line).

For a poem written in 8 line stanzas of four rhyming couplets, check her post: The Burden of Specialness – Firely. She’s a new blogger. 1 MississippiShe’s a good poet. And did I mention she writes for children? A book she wrote and illustrated was published by Backstroke Books, called 1 Mississippi. So, if you’re looking for poetry, take a look at her blog. If you have kids learning to read, try out her book.

One last thing, if you love Robert Pattinson, the painfully soul-drenched vampire of Twilight, you will find a soul-mate in Gustafson. (She can be forgiven, my wife was also smitten by the smolder.)

I love Robert Pattinson.  I also love Walt Whitman, W.B. Yeats and Virginia Woolf, so please don’t judge me too harshly.   Though I’ve actually been quite amazed by my love for Pattinson.  It is not just his looks (okay, it’s his looks), but also an inherent, seeming, sweetness.   The casual smile, upturned lips, harassed hair, truly harassed self.

3 responses

  1. Dear UpinVermont, Thanks so much for your very kind words. I really appreciate your reading my blog and your thoughtful comments. I am eager to check out your stories and fables, and work on poems. (Your teacher seems to have spent her time well!)

    I do TRY for meter, but I’m afraid I tend towards the syllabic. In the formal poetry category, I’ve also posted several villanelles, and given instructions on how to write them, as they are kind of a fun form.

    At any rate, thanks again. Also, thanks for the kind comments re the counting book. Right now it is only available on Amazon, but BackStroke Books will soon have its own website where it will sell at discounted prices.

    Finally, I hope your wife enjoys Pattinson in New Moon! (Ha ha.)

    Take care, Karin Gustafson (ManicDDaily)

    • You are most welcome. I hope your book is successful.

      As to the meter of your sonnet. I thought it might be syllabic or accentual, but since neither was regular I supposed that you opted for a sort of rhyming “free verse” (which is how I first began writing sonnets). However, if syllabic was your intention, then I stand corrected. : )

  2. Pingback: No Rest For The Weary – Metered Feet « ManicDDaily

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