Opening Book: The Ghost at High Tide Page 10-12

[This is an old poem, written in 1989. I wrote it for an actress wanting a soliloquy for an audition. I still wasn’t writing blank verse up to this point.]

page-10-the-ghost-at-high-tide-nautilus1

page-11-the-ghost-at-high-tide-nautilus1

page-12-the-ghost-at-high-tide-nautilus1

4 responses

  1. Backward Vermont Poet, did I exhaust your interest in Yeats? I’ve not seen you reply either here or on Amazon classical-music discussion forums. I would glad to pursue this with you and have a yarn about music and poetry, as you proposed. I even foolishly ventured to leave a poor sonnet on the Do You Dare board.

    –Edgar Self

  2. Hello Edgar!

    You did not exhaust my interest in Yeats. It’s 6:30 in the morning and I’m racing to get to work! My favorite form is blank verse, and though Yeats’ work in the form is uneven, his powerful diction, built on rhetorical patterning, is to me the most compelling since Marlowe. I read him for that.

    He rarely brings me to a stop, though, with the beauty or originality of an image. In that sense, he reminds me more of Massinger. There’s rarely an image that makes the reader want to stop, linger over it, turn it in the hand like a finely cut gem.

    The other facet of Yeats is his willful nationality – his references to myths and topical subjects that no one without annotation could ever appreciate or comprehend. I don’t have patience for that. I leave those pleasures to the Irish which, in fact, is exactly what Yeats wanted.

    Tell me though, what you enjoy about Yeats. I want to hear more.

  3. You must live near the ocean. You are truly inspired by it. I lost a son 2002 and your poem “the ghost at high tide nautilus” reminds me of him. Lovely poem. We’re still banging away at the Keats-Dickinson essay. It’s coming along. Have a gerat day!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: