Vermont Poetry Newsletter • April 7 2012

[The Vermont Poetry Newsletter is not issued by me but by Ron Lewis, by whose permission I post this. PLEASE NOTE: I have edited his newsletter so that links are provided rather than text. If I cannot find a link, I will either omit the relevant portion of the newsletter to avoid copyright violations, or I will provide an alternate link. Please contact Ron Lewis if you would like to receive his Newsletter in full. All images are linked.]

Vermont Poetry Newsletter

Your Poetry & Spoken Word Gateway
In The Green Mountain State

April 7, 2012 (Previous issue: 01/28) –
In This Issue:

  1. About VPN
  2. Newsletter Editor/Publisher’s Note
  3. Writing Assignments/Suggestions/Exercises/Prompts
  4. Jerry Johnson/Jon Gailmor/Pete Sutherland CD
  5. Thinking Like An Editor: How to Order Your Poetry Manuscript
  6. FAQ’s re: Paperbacks
  7. Need to Create? Get a Constraint
  8. The Importance of Mind-Wandering
  9. Spoken Word Poetry Booms at Middlebury College
  10. Karin Gottshall: Visiting Lecturer in Eng. & Am. Studies
  11. The Adirondack Review
  12. The Triolet Verse Form
  13. Poem-A-Day Challenge
  14. Poetry FAQ
  15. I’m Comic Sans, A-Hole
  16. How To Read Poetry
  17. PoemCity Montpelier 2012
  18. Adrienne Rich, 1929-2012
  19. Vermont State Poet Laureate Sydney Lea’s Calendar
  20. AWP Conference 2012, Chicago
  21. Do Male Poets Have Crushes on Female Poets?
  22. Public Responsibilities of Known American Poets
  23. Poet, Editor, Mentor
  24. A Timeout: Bomono
  25. Literary Competition, League of Vermont Writers
  26. Burlington Poet, Sue D. Burton, Wins Prize
  27. The Otter Creek Poets April Poetry Series
  28. Poetry In The News
  29. Newburyport Literary Festival, MA
  30. More Broken Line
  31. Great Poetry Links: Toto Poetry
  32. Poetry Quote – Robert Frost
  33. Poetry Foundation’s Inaugural President Retires
  34. Copper Canyon Press Poem
  35. Linebreak Poem
  36. American Life in Poetry Poem
  37. US Poets Laureate List
  38. Vermont Poet Laureates
  39. US Poet Laureates From Vermont
  40. New Hampshire Poet Laureates
  41. US Poet Laureates From New Hampshire
  42. All Past National Book Critics Circle Award Winners and Finalists
  43. Contact Info for Editor/Publisher of VPN: Ron Lewis
  44. Vermont Literary Journals
  45. Vermont Literary Groups’ Anthologies
  46. Vermont Poetry Blogs
  47. State Poetry Society (PSOV)
  48. Year-Round Poetry Workshops in Vermont
  49. Other Poetry Workshops in Vermont
  50. Year-Round Poetry Writing Centers in Vermont
  51. Other Writing Groups in Vermont
  52. Poetry Event Calendar

1.) About the Vermont Poetry Newsletter Network

The Vermont Poetry Newsletter Network is made up of people of all backgrounds, ages and skills who appreciate the craft of poetry and want to promote it in the beautiful state of Vermont. The network consists of a free e-mail list, an eventual web site, workshops, open mics, poetry performances and other literary events. The network provides opportunities to meet local poets, talk about and enjoy poetry, and motivate and inspire yourself in whatever writing projects you are involved.

The mission of the Vermont Poetry Newsletter is to foster the poetry arts community in the Green Mountain State, home to more writers and poets per capita than any other state in the nation. Its goals are to serve as a resource for and about VT poets; to support the development of individual poets; and to encourage an audience for poetry in Vermont.

Dating from 2009, the Vermont Poetry Newsletters are being archived on a blog maintained by poet Patrick Gillespie at PoemShape.

2.) Dear Friends of Poetry:

We’re now in the thick of National Poetry Month (April), aka National Let’s-Have-Every-Poetry-Event-Stacked-On-Top-of-Each-Other Month, so you should begin, if you haven’t been already, looking more closely at the second half of this newsletter, the Poetry Event Calendar (PEC). I think this is the month that encourages more poetry from us, as there are many more poetry readings in every corner of our state. And, it’s not my imagination, but there are many more readings than say, five or ten years ago. Poetry is becoming more “hip,” more accessible, and more valuable to the average person. Of course, the PEC promotes and announces poetry readings to the audience most likely to attend them, thus encourages more venues and poets to provide readings. One stimulates the other, stimulates another, and so on.

I’ve often wondered what the state of poetry would be like here in Vermont without the Vermont Poetry Newsletter. Poets point out how much the VPN means to them, and really, that is all I need to know. I think it provides our community of poets a valuable, free resource, a free literary journal, if you will. Vermont is full of “neighbor helping neighbor” instances – take Tropical Storm Irene as an example – and the VPN is just another of these wonderful things about living in this state. I’m editing each new VPN as my way of giving something to my poet friends.

I hope you enjoy this new issue!

Ron Lewis
VPN Editor/Publisher
(802) 247-5913
vtpoet@gmail.com

3.) WRITING ASSIGNMENT • SUGGESTION EXERCISES

  • Here’s one for you, right from my own writing desk.

Letter to the Forgotten/Never Too Late

Sure, many of us have had legendary poets as their mentors, or can visualize them as becoming legendary by the time they’re left to memory. If you didn’t get the chance to say something to them, even to say your goodbyes, what would that be? Conjure up those thoughts, pretend what you have to say to them is what you forgot to say to them while you had the chance. It could be in the form of a letter, a phone call, an email, even telepathy, I suppose. Pretend that it might be the last thing they’ll ever read or hear, something they’ll have to take to the grave, or take back to the grave, if they have to be resurrected in order to get your message. Make it the culmination of what you learned from them. Make them proud they had you in their classroom, that you were listening.

Previous Writing Assignment

Good Luck!

4.)

  • I’d like to make a personal recommendation of a bright, witty CD put together by a dear friend of mine, Jerry Johnson, the Creek Road Poet from Irasburg, VT. Stitched together with Johnson’s lyrics and Jon Gailmor’s and Pete Sutherland’s terrific melodies, every song in this compilation will have you humming, singing, and if you’re home alone by yourself, dancing around the house! These songs are great for kids and, admittedly, for adults as well (I confess they bring out the kid in me!). There’s nothing here you won’t like, and if you purchase more than one CD, the price is just a measly twelve and a half bucks; you can’t even buy a book a single book of poems for that anymore, let alone two! You have my personal guarantee of satisfaction.Ron Lewis, VPN Editor

Music CD (Poems into Music)
Jerry Johnson (Lyrics)
Jon Gailmor (Melodies)
Pete Sutherland (Melodies)

“Jerry Johnson has the true songwriter’s gift: his lyrics seem so simple, but that’s a deception. The more one listens — and the tunes are brilliantly served by the excellent Jon Gailmor and Pete Sutherland — the deeper they get. What a pleasure this album is!”
—Sydney Lea, Poet Laureate of Vermont

“Jerry Johnson’s poems and the music of Jon Gailmor and Pete Sutherland are a lyrical celebration of the ‘Vermont Tradition’ at its best.” —Howard Frank Mosher, award-winning Vermont author

“Jerry Johnson turned tunesmiths Jon Gailmor and Pete Sutherland loose on sixteen of his best Vermont poems: the result is a joyful blend of meditations and hoopla, with guitars, piano, banjo, fiddle, and melodies as original as the poems they celebrate.”
—Geof Hewitt, author of The Perfect Heart: Selected & New Poems

  • Jerry is nearing completion of his terrific new web site.  If you’re interested in purchasing his CD, you can go there to find out all the particulars.  In addition, you can even hear small snippets of some of the songs from the CD, just by rolling over the song titles with your mouse.  What are you waiting for?  Get on over to Jerry’s web site and have a listen! Ron Lewis, VPN Editor

5.) Thinking Like an Editor: How to Order Your Poetry Manuscript

by April Ossmann

In my experience as a book editor, the biggest mystery to emerging and sometimes even established poets is how to effectively order a poetry manuscript. As a poet working on revising and re-revising my graduate thesis toward book publication, I didn’t have much idea either. Here’s why: Ordering a manuscript requires a different kind of thinking than line editing or revising your poems—a kind of thinking I hadn’t been taught. A poet I work with calls it “the helicopter view,” which I love. I think of ordering as a kind of three-dimensional thinking, as opposed to the two-dimensional thinking (like using tweezers under a microscope) necessary for line editing poems. Ordering requires seeing each poem from a distance, so that all its sides are visible; it also requires seeing the manuscript as a whole, so that you can decide how each poem and its parts might connect with others in a series.

“If the poem doesn’t fit the criteria, save it for a future manuscript, for rereading, for framing as a broadside and hanging on the living room wall—but don’t leave it in the manuscript. Strength, not length, makes a good book.”

It wasn’t until the beginning of my tenure as executive director of Alice James Books, in 2000, that I really learned how to order poetry manuscripts. I challenged myself to suggest an ordering strategy particular to the poetic style, themes, subjects, obsessions, strengths, and weaknesses of each book I edited. Excited as I was to be entrusted with the task, I was profoundly anxious. Since I hadn’t yet published my first book, all the poets I edited had accomplished something that was still a goal of mine. At the very least they had had their first book accepted, and many had published multiple books. But performance anxiety was a good teaching tool; I was determined to give my best to those poets, and to make sure my best got better. The method I developed is the one I still use, ninety-plus edited books later. (….)

6.) Frequently Asked Questions

Q. Why do paperback books come out in two different sizes?

A. The two formats are called mass market paperback and trade paperback. The mass market version is small, usually non-illustrated and a less expensive bookbinding format. Books in this format are often sold in non-traditional locations such as airports, drug stores, and supermarkets, as well as bookstores.

Some titles, especially fiction by new authors, are issued as first editions in the mass market paperback format.

Trade paperbacks have thicker paper covers and paper similar to hardcovers. They are often about the same size as a hardcover, but slightly smaller because the binding is done differently. Some trade paperbacks look the same as mass market paperbacks, but with better quality paper and covers.

Some readers prefer the trade versions because they will withstand more readings due to the higher quality binding. It can be a matter of taste, but sometimes you will find the book you want is only available in one paperback version.

7.) Need to Create? Get a Constraint
By Jonah Lehrer
November 13, 2011

One of the many paradoxes of human creativity is that it seems to benefit from constraints. Although we imagine the imagination as requiring total freedom, the reality of the creative process is that it’s often entangled with strict conventions and formal requirements. Pop songs have choruses and refrains; symphonies have four movements; plays have five acts; painters still rely on the tropes of portraiture.

Perhaps the best example of this phenomenon is poetry. At first glance, the art seems to be defined by its liberation from ordinary language – poets don’t have to obey the rules of syntax and punctuation. And yet, most poetry still depends on literary forms with exacting requirements, such as haikus, sestets and sonnets. This writing method seems to make little sense, since it makes the creative act much more difficult. Instead of composing free verse, poets frustrate themselves with structural constraints. Why?

A new study led by Janina Marguc at the University of Amsterdam, and published in The Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, provides an interesting answer. It turns out that the obstacles of form come with an unexpected psychological perk, allowing people to think in a more all-encompassing fashion. The introduction of the paper sets up the mystery. (….)

8.) The Importance of Mind-Wandering
By Jonah Lehrer
October 25, 2011

It’s easy to underestimate boredom. The mental condition, after all, is defined by its lack of stimulation; it’s the mind at its most apathetic. This is why the poet Joseph Brodsky described boredom as a “psychological Sahara,” a cognitive desert “that starts right in your bedroom and spurns the horizon.” The hands of the clock seem to stop; the stream of consciousness slows to a drip. We want to be anywhere but here.

However, as Brodsky also noted, boredom and its synonyms can also become a crucial tool of creativity. “Boredom is your window,” the poet declared. “Once this window opens, don’t try to shut it; on the contrary, throw it wide open.”

Brodsky was right. The secret isn’t boredom per se: It’s how boredom makes us think. When people are immersed in monotony, they automatically lapse into a very special form of brain activity: mind-wandering. In a culture obsessed with efficiency, mind-wandering is often derided as a lazy habit, the kind of thinking we rely on when we don’t really want to think. (Freud regarded mind-wandering as an example of “infantile” thinking.) It’s a sign of procrastination, not productivity.

In recent years, however, neuroscience has dramatically revised our views of mind-wandering. For one thing, it turns out that the mind wanders a ridiculous amount. Last year, the Harvard psychologists Daniel Gilbert and Matthew A. Killingsworth published a fascinating paper in Science documenting our penchant for disappearing down the rabbit hole of our own mind. The scientists developed an iPhone app that contacted 2,250 volunteers at random intervals, asking them about their current activity and levels of happiness. It turns out that people were engaged in mind-wandering 46.9 percent of the time. In fact, the only activity in which their minds were not constantly wandering was love making. They were able to focus for that. (….)

9.) Spoken Word Poetry Booms at Midd

By Emily Scarisbrick
02/16/2012

Spoken word poetry is taking over Middlebury, with groups like Poor Form Poetry and Middslam joining the established ranks of Verbal Onslaught. Last year, Night Kite Revival and Andrea Gibson both performed at 51 Main and Poor Form Poetry went to the National Championships for spoken word. This January, Poor Form reached the finals of the New England Regional Tournament. Middslam held their first poetry slam on campus at Crossroads Cafe. The presence and impact of these creative groups on campus will continue to grow in the spring as Middslam continues to hold open slams and workshops and again takes a team to nationals.
Spoken word at Middlebury has its roots in Verbal Onslaught, which began in 2008 and has been lead variously by Dane Verret ’12, Chris de la Cruz ’13, Day Williams ’14 and Laura Shabb ’15.
“Verbal was started as a way to bring an urban flavor to Midd,” said Verret. “We always wanted Verbal to be a space for people to share who they were openly and in safety.” (….)

10.) Karin Gottshall: Visiting Lecturer in English and American Literatures
Emily Scarisbrick
09/15/2011

As we scuttle around campus at the beginning of the semester, it’s hard to remember that we go to a school rich in literary history. Every few years, the Department of English and American Literatures sponsors a poet to teach on campus, hold workshops and contribute to the literary life of the school. We spoke to its newest appointment, Karin Gottshall, about her work as a poet and her role at the College.
The Middlebury Campus: Can you tell us a little bit about what you like to write and what kind of projects you have taken on in the past? What do you plan to work on in the future?

Karin Gottshall: I write both poetry and short stories. My first poetry book, Crocus, came out in 2007 with Fordham University Press, and that was a collection of poems that were written over a few years, including the years that I was in graduate school. I have a chapbook called Flood Letters, which just came out this spring with a beautiful little press in Brooklyn, Argos Books, and that is much more of a “project” book — it’s a series of poems about a catastrophic flood, told in the voice of a woman who has been isolated in her home by the rising waters. Right now I’m finishing up another full-length manuscript of poems. (….)

11.) The Adirondack Review

The Adirondack Review is an independent online quarterly magazine of literature and the arts dedicated to publishing poetry, fiction, artwork, and photography, as well as interviews, articles, book reviews, and translations. Recently named a “great online literary magazine” by Esquire and a “top online journal” by The Huffington Post, TAR was established in the spring of 2000, with its first issue appearing that summer.

We maintain a successful internship program in which the student combines practical editorial experience with an individualized focus that meets the needs of both the student and the magazine. Interns may arrange to receive academic credit for their work at TAR.

If you are considering submitting your work to the Review, please be sure to look over the guidelines before doing so.

Although we continue to publish established and emerging writers, we are very open to unpublished poets and writers. It is always a thrill to discover and encourage new talent. Each issue tends to reflect this commitment to publishing both those with extensive publication credits in widely respected journals as well as writers for whom TAR is their first publication.

~ Colleen Ryor, Founding Editor

Note: The Adirondack Review, an online-only literary journal, has some of the finest artwork of all the literary journals. Lately, they’ve been featuring some of the work of Beatrice Coron, who does something known as “papercuts.” Look at the wonderful piece she did for the cover of Volume XII, No. 3, Winter 2011: http://www.theadirondackreview.com/archives.html.

12.) The Triolet Verse Form

The Triolet (“triplet”), a French verse form, is a poem or a stanza of eight lines that include two rhymes and two refrains.

One refrain is the repetition of the first line at the fourth line and the seventh line; this triple appearance of one line gives the Triolet its name.

Read more at: http://www.baymoon.com/~ariadne/form/triolet.htm

13.) Poem-A-Day Challenge

  • Yes, it’s National Poetry Month, and you’re anxious to write something. Here is Robert Lee Brewer’s challenge to you, the guidelines, the contest! Take a look, then get poeming!

Click here.

14.) POETRY FAQ

By Wendy MacLeod

What is poetry?

Poetry is clumps of words that make people feel something.

- – -
Was poetry meant to be read silently or aloud?

Yes and yes! Rhyme began circa 367 B.C. or A.D. when somebody, Homer, I think, wanted to tell a famous story about a Greek guy and have people remember it. Later, in the schoolyard, rhyme developed into jump-rope songs before there were phones to look at. Soon rhyme was used to tout a company’s products and services for an ironic effect after natural disasters, i.e.. “Nationwide is on your side.” Rhyme is still alive “in the hood,” where rappers use it to urge their fellow “gangstas” to kill policemen. But African-American poets have contributed more than rap; they also wrote many Harlem Renaissances.

- – -
Why do people go to poetry readings?

Some go to get signed copies of books that may one day be worth something on eBay. Some go because it makes them look arty and deep. But most use poetry readings as a gentle, non-addictive sleep aid.

15.) I’M COMIC SANS, ASSHOLE.
BY Mike Lacher

Listen up. I know the shit you’ve been saying behind my back. You think I’m stupid. You think I’m immature. You think I’m a malformed, pathetic excuse for a font. Well think again, nerdhole, because I’m Comic Sans, and I’m the best thing to happen to typography since Johannes fucking Gutenberg.

You don’t like that your coworker used me on that note about stealing her yogurt from the break room fridge? You don’t like that I’m all over your sister-in-law’s blog? You don’t like that I’m on the sign for that new Thai place? You think I’m pedestrian and tacky? Guess the fuck what, Picasso. We don’t all have seventy-three weights of stick-up-my-ass Helvetica sitting on our seventeen-inch MacBook Pros. Sorry the entire world can’t all be done in stark Eurotrash Swiss type. Sorry some people like to have fun. Sorry I’m standing in the way of your minimalist Bauhaus-esque fascist snoozefest. Maybe sometime you should take off your black turtleneck, stop compulsively adjusting your Tumblr theme, and lighten the fuck up for once. (….)

16.) How To Read Poetry

17.) Poems & Locations

  • We have got such a great line up for you! Our main text display features 224 poets–almost 100 more than last year! Come by in April 2012 to read, write, and share your poems with us.

Go to: http://www.montpelieralive.org/poemcity

If you can’t make a reading, Goddard College radio station WGDR may be offering it live via a stream to your computer. Go here to see what’s on the program and to go online: http://www.wgdr.org/listen-live/

From listening to our new Vermont State Poet Laureate (!) to participating in a broadside workshop (!) to learning the intricacies of delivering poems from the podium, led by actor and poetry performer Morgan Irons (!), this month-long list of activities is the most ambitious poetry event of the year!Ron Lewis, VPN Editor

18.) ADRIENNE RICH, 1929-2012
A Poet of Unswerving Vision at the Forefront of Feminism
By Margalit Fox

NY Times, March 28, 2012

Adrienne Rich, a poet of towering reputation and towering rage, whose work — distinguished by an unswerving progressive vision and a dazzling, empathic ferocity — brought the oppression of women and lesbians to the forefront of poetic discourse and kept it there for nearly a half-century, died on Tuesday at her home in Santa Cruz, Calif. She was 82.

The cause was complications of rheumatoid arthritis, with which she had lived for most of her adult life, her family said.

Widely read, widely anthologized, widely interviewed and widely taught, Ms. Rich was for decades among the most influential writers of the feminist movement and one of the best-known American public intellectuals. She wrote two dozen volumes of poetry and more than a half-dozen of prose; the poetry alone has sold nearly 800,000 copies, according to W. W. Norton & Company, her publisher since the mid-1960s.

Triply marginalized — as a woman, a lesbian and a Jew — Ms. Rich was concerned in her poetry, and in her many essays, with identity politics long before the term was coined. (….)

19.) Vermont State Poet Laureate

Sydney Lea
Go to: http://www.sydneylea.net/

Calendar 2012

April 6 – Newbury Elementary School (with Jay Parini) 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. Newbury, Vermont

April 10 – Kimball Public Library 7:00 p.m. Randolph, Vermont

April 26 – Norwich Public Library 7:00 p.m. Norwich, Vermont

May 10 – Deborah Rawson Memorial Library 6:30 p.m. Jericho, Vermont

May 16-20 – International P.E.N Conference Bled, Slovenia

May 28 – Woodlands Retirement Community APD Hospital Lebanon, New Hampshire

June 10 – Frost Stone House Museum 2:00 p.m. Shaftsbury, Vermont

June 14 – Bent Northrup Library 7 p.m. Fairfield, Vermont

June 15 – Celebration of Expressive Arts Montgomery, Vermont

June 22 – Riverwood Poetry Series 7 p.m. Wadsworth Athenaeum Hartford, Connecticut

June 28 – Old Town Hall 7 p.m. Brookfield, Vermont

August 9 – Vermont Festival of the Arts Joslin Memorial Library Waitsfield, Vermont

August 23 – Strafford Meeting House Strafford, Vermont

September 21 – Burlington Book Festival 7 p.m.

September 26 – Newfane Library 7 p.m. Newfane, Vermont

November 9 – Next Stage Theater (w/Victoria Redel) 7 p.m. Putney, Vermont

20.) AWP CONFERENCE – CHICAGO – 2012

By Jim Cummins

Along with approximately 10,999 other registrants, I attended the recent AWP Conference in Chicago earlier this month. I also attended the first Woodstock, in August, 1969. They were similar events, minus the rock bands and the loudspeaker announcements about bad acid. On the other hand, Chicago had poetry in the elevators; a tape loop of poets reading their own poems played continuously in the elevators throughout the conference. This was obviously a social-networking device on the Hilton’s part to help people break the ice, in lieu of mud, good vibes, and the aforementioned bad acid. As I understand it, a few years ago the Poetry Foundation made a number of tape loops of poets collaborating with visual artists; the one that played in the elevators at this year’s AWP was also available in its entirety on the in-house channel 44, on our room TVs. I remember poems by Mark Strand, Todd Boss, our own DL, a number of others. I thought the tape loop was wonderful, sort of the equivalent of the rock groups at Woodstock–the background sounds of human contact, interaction. In the morning I’d get on an elevator crammed with poets, and Mark Strand would say, “I don’t want to be an American poet anymore,” or something like that. (….)

21.) Do Male Poets Have Crushes on Female Poems? [by DL]

Maybe, but the reverse is also true, and the old canard that male poetry editors like it when the women talk dirty implies bad faith on the part of the males and bad morals on the part of the females and is as reductive as concluding from a man’s appreciation of, say, Marianne Moore’s poems that the chap likes scholarly and quaint. There’s more to Moore than that, and a poem with the tits to start “Fuck me” is daring not so much because of the grab-you opening but because that’s a high standard of intensity for the rest of the poem to live up to.

Do (some) male poets have a weakness (or a yen) for lustful poems by women on the order of Olena Kalytiak Davis, Jill Alexander Essbaum, Kim Addonizio, Jennifer L. Knox, Nin Andrews, Deborah Landau, Moira Egan, Cynthia Hungtington, Sharon Olds? Sure, but the length of that list and the fact that it could be twice as long lead to a different explanation, and I would argue that female sexuality is an area of experience that had not until recently been explored quite as candidly and with language as frank and sometimes even deliberately crude as you find in the best American erotic poetry. After the 1960s you could tell there was a void in the literature and you knew you could do something about it. Taking advantage of the opportunity, talented women have given us some wonderful erotic poems. (….)

22.) The Public Responsibilities of Known American Poets

BY EUGENE SCHLANGER

Recently, Forbes magazine attempted to measure the effect of Ruth Lilly’s $185 million bequest to the Poetry Foundation. That foundation, which publishes Poetry magazine, claims that it reached 19 million new poetry readers last year. John Barr, its president, a poet and a former investment banker, suggested this was positive evidence of the growth of the public’s awareness and reception of this art form. Quantitatively, the market for poetry may have increased. Qualitatively, the results are far less clear.

In 1943 T. S. Eliot addressed the British-Norwegian Institute and attempted to measure the social function of poetry. He asked whether a poem could serve a public purpose. In addition to the pleasure of reading, can a poem expand the public’s awareness of non-literary issues, such as those in the social, political, economic, or religious arenas? Noting his inability to read Norwegian, Eliot said that if hypothetically no new Norwegian poetry were ever to be written again, he still understood that was a global loss because it would affect the ability of all people to express themselves. In other words, although civilizations and nations differ, poetic language has a universal purpose. (….)

23.) Poet, Editor, Mentor
Interview with Lissa Kiernan, Editor of Arsenic Lobster

Lissa Kiernan is poetry editor for Arsenic Lobster and founding director of The Rooster Moans Poetry Cooperative, a provider of online poetry workshops. She holds an MFA from the Stonecoast program at the University of Southern Maine, and her work can be found in Albatross, Canary, Whale Sound, and elsewhere.

Interview by Renee Beauregard Lute

Lissa, you founded The Rooster Moans in 2007. What is the creation story? How did it get its name?

Following my father’s death from complications of a brain tumor in 2003, I started to write poetry, after a long hiatus. I’d stopped around the time I moved to New York City after graduating from UMass/Amherst with my English degree. For better or worse, I back-burnered poetic ambitions in favor of embarking on a long personal and professional journey, which included obtaining my MA in Media Arts at The New School at a time when the Web was just beginning to burgeon, and meeting and marrying my husband Chris. (….)

24.) A Timeout: Bomono

  • In the event you need a break from writing poetry (hey, we all need a time out!), here is a very cool interactive art tool.
  • And here are some saved finished works of art using Bomono.

25.) ANNOUNCING THE LEAGUE OF VERMONT WRITERS’ LITERARY COMPETITION 2012, THE VERMONT PRIZE

The League of Vermont Writers has launched a new literary competition in 2012 with the award of The Vermont Prize and a $1,000 award given in each of three genres. The theme for the inaugural year’s competition is “My New England.” Submissions will be accepted in three categories:

  • Fiction
  • Personal Essay
  • Poetry

Fee: $15 per submission, non-refundable.

Submissions may include up to 3000 words for fiction (adult only); up to 1500 words for personal essay; up to 5 poems of no more than one page in length each.

Writers may submit to one or more categories; only one entry per category is permitted. Multiple submissions in a single category will not be accepted.

The LVW Literary Competition 2012 is open to all writers, whether League members or nonmembers. Submissions will be accepted beginning February 1, 2012. Deadline for submissions is May 15, 2012.

Winners of The Vermont Prize will be announced in July.

Grand Prize Winners in each category will receive $1,000 and guaranteed appearance in the League’s Vermont Prize Anthology for 2012. Fifteen finalists in each category will also be considered for inclusion in the anthology, at the discretion of the editors.

26.)

  • Congratulations to Vermonter Sue D. Burton for winning second prize in the Hill-Stead Museum’s (Farmington, CT) 2012 Sunken Garden Poetry Prize annual chapbook competition—for “Canticle to Self’s Jewelry, Lincoln Way West”. The poem was also published in Sou’wester Magazine, Vol. 36, No. 2. Spring 2008. Sue is a physician’s assistant specializing in women’s health care. Her poetry has appeared in Beloit Poetry Journal, Green Mountains Review, Harvard Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Hunger Mountain, New Ohio Review, and on Verse Daily. She has been awarded a Vermont Arts Council grant and nominated for a Pushcart. She earned an MFA from Vermont College and lives in Burlington, Vermont.

CANTICLE TO SELF’S JEWELRY, LINCOLN WAY W., CANTON, OHIO

& to Heggy’s Homemade Candies up the road & to the mural,
whatever its title, in downtown Massillon, of a Greek temple
with football players subbing for the gods, & a faux marble
frieze of the high school band.
I sing to you, my Oddities, my Wonders who have
withstood Wal-Mart & the mall, & to my mother
who has moved from house to house,
& to South Beach & the Art Deco pink Cadillac of a hotel
where surely the widow Self is wintering,
her store, Antiques & Jewelry — huff & puff –
all boarded up “For the Month.”& I sing to you, Lord, if that’s who you are — Word
like as a fire — who lived in her jewelry drawer, in
the black onyx rosary beads. Tigereyes, rhinestones,
tiny rocks that opened, flecks of gold inside
& after the fire a still, small voice. Where does she go,
Lord, strapped all day in her wheelchair
staring, nodding. Evaporating –
like the blue knit suit I kept
folded in her bureau at the previous home,
for the funeral. O, the nurses were so
sorry they sent along a walker in its plac.(I must remember not to say, Do you remember?)

Lord, when I was a child, I begged you
to take her. But now I sing, Hi, Moo,
& she sings, Hi, Sue. Now,
in Word or Whatever, tell me:
What brings her back sometimes,
that glimmer, the fading she
she is now?

I say, Dotty called. She brightens.
Oh, I should write her. I get in such a slump.
She dozes. I lullaby. There once was
a dance, & there you met Daddy. There once was
a school, & you were the teacher.
She opens one eye.
Sue, Sue, you’re getting nostalgic.
Eye closes.

Lord, break out the loot from Self’s Jewelry –
toe rings, ruby brooches, rose topaz tiaras,
truckloads of garnets & sparkles & facets & glitter, sweet
self bespangled, a blushing bride in a ten-gallon hat
studded with carnelians like those
pink birds I saw once in the Everglades, big,
way bigger than turkey vultures, thirty
perched in a tree, pink &
outrageous like the six-winged Seraph in Giotto’s
panel of St. Francis, O
Lord, remember how the Seraph beamed down
a Sign, how the fire-tipped Seraph
made visible your Love.

Author: Sue D. Burton

Sue Burton will be reading on Wednesday, July 11th.

27.) LIVES OF THE POETS: THE OTTER CREEK POETS ANNUAL NATIONAL POETRY MONTH SERIES
April 5, 12, 19 & 26, 2012

  • Please join the Otter Creek Poets on four Thursday afternoons for a series of readings and informal talks about poetry and poets. All are welcome.

Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main Street, Middlebury
Admission: Free. Parking available behind the library.

For additional information, call David Weinstock 989-4314, or david.weinstock@gmail.com

April 5, 1-2 pm
Poet and singer/songwriter Laura Heaberlin will read from the discuss her new collection of poems for her Middlebury College thesis.

April 5, 2-3 pm
Brett Millier, Cook Professor of American Literature at Middlebury College, will discuss her new book, Jean Garrigue: A Critical Biography, about the 20th century American expatriate poet Jean Garrigue (1914-1972).

April 12, 1-3 pm
James Hayford, Jr., son of Vermont poet Jim Hayford (1913-1993), a protégé of Robert Frost, will discuss his father’s life and work and take questions.

April 19, 1-3 pm
Playwright Noah Mease will speak about “Green Eden,” which he debuted at Middlebury’s Hepburn Zoo Theater in 2011. The play is inspired by the true story of Spanish poet Federico García Lorca’s 10-day visit with Philip Cummings at Lake Eden, Vermont, in august 1929, and the repercussions of that visit on Cumming’s later life.

April 26, 1-3 pm
Chloë Joan López, author of the chapbook Quodlibet and the upcoming Elixir Press prize volume Quelled Communiqués, will read and discuss her work.

28.) POETRY IN THE NEWS

Fitting Poetry to the Screen: How one press is working to solve poetry’s e-book problems
By Craig Morgan Teicher

The same problem persists—e-books and poetry just don’t get along as well as e-books and prose. It’s those line breaks, poetry’s defining feature. The problem is a simple sounding one, but really tough to solve. Because the same e-book has to work on many different screens and devices on which readers can change the font and size of the text, it’s impossible to guarantee the line will display as the poet intended.

Of course, poetry publishers have the same problem with print books—sometimes poets’ lines are wider than a book’s trim size (take Walt Whitman or Allen Ginsberg), but there’s a convention to solve this: when a poetic line continues over the edge of a printed page, it’s indented on the next line. It’s been surprisingly hard to reliably recreate this indenting in an e-book, to make sure poems keep the integrity of their lines when they appear on screen.

An Ambitious Plan

Last year we told you about one possible solution: Bookmobile’s Ampersand poetry app and store front, a project that seems, sadly, to have been shelved in the wake of Apple’s changing in-app purchase rules, though Bookmobile’s Don Leeper told PW that the development work on Ampersand has been used to create custom book apps and e-book storefronts for publishers. This year, Copper Canyon Press, one of the biggest exclusive poetry publishers, received a $100,000 grant from the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation specifically for the purpose of launching an e-book line and working on some of the difficulties of getting poetry on screen. Copper Canyon has been working with its distributor, Consortium (as well as the rest of Perseus), to create a better poetry e-book. (….)

29.)

  • Don’t forget about the Newburyport Literary Festival, in Newburyport, MA, April 27-28. It’s only 3 hours from Rutland, VT. There are tons of poetry readings, musical collaborations, and workshops. Take a look for yourself (perhaps you can go with a poet friend).

30.) More Broken Lines
by Mike Snyder
(From Mike Snider’s Formal Blog)

So what happens when you do write a long narrative in verse and someone else tries to read it?

The key question, it seems to me, is what happens at the line breaks. If you looked a little at the miscellany at the bottom of yesterday’s post, you’ll know I think line breaks in free verse must be acknowledged by a pause when reading, while line breaks in metrical verse shouldn’t be. (….)

  • You won’t be surprised to read that I’ve chosen to tell my ghost story murder mystery in rhymed metrical verse. But in what form? I’ve previously podcast terza rima versions of the “Invocation” and an opening fragment of “Canto I,” and I did rewrite a fragment of that fragment into ottava rima. Today, I’ve podcast the latter, as well — why not give a listen and tell me what you think? (podcast no longer available – Ron, VPN Editor) (It’s OK to think I’m crazy and tell me that, too.)

31.) Great Poetry Links

“Toto Poetry”

Mission: If English dictionaries define the word poetry, perhaps we can define all English words with poetry. Using experimentation and new media, this project heavily relies on the mathematics of language to create didactic digital poems – one or more for virtually all words in the dictionary.

History: With origins dating back to the 1990s, the poems posted here were created for educational or didactic purposes. They are designed to mostly benefit non-English speakers (by far the largest users of a dictionary project I am working on, and who can click on words in the poems for translations if they are using non-English browsers). In addition to illustrating various English-language poetic forms (especially the forms used to teach English), in many “English for non-English speakers” courses, poetry exercises are used to allow learners to explore the complexities of English, and to help students retain vocabulary (some persons benefit reading didactic poetry as a form of learning). (….)

  • If you don’t understand what’s going on here, just drop a word, words, or a line into the blank box found at the address above. What pops up next is truly amazing!Ron Lewis, VPN Editor

32.)

“A poem begins as a lump in the throat, a sense of wrong, a homesickness, a lovesickness.”

Poetry Quote by Robert Frost

33.) FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

March 15, 2012

Poetry Foundation’s Inaugural President, John Barr, Announces Retirement
Led Organization Dedicated to Strengthening Poetry’s Role in American Culture

CHICAGO—John Barr announced today that he will retire as the Poetry Foundation’s inaugural president at the end of 2012, after nearly a decade of leading the organization. The Poetry Foundation is dedicated to increasing the art form’s presence in American culture by bringing quality poetry to the largest possible audience.

Under Barr’s leadership, the Foundation has greatly increased the national audience for poetry. The combined outreach of Poetry magazine, public programming and events, the Foundation website, and media partnerships now places poetry of the highest quality before 20 million people annually. (….)

34.)

Here’s a poem from Copper Canyon Press.

Equinox
By Adrienne Rich

Time split like a fruit between dark and light
and a usual fog drags
over this landfall
I’ve walked September end to end
barefoot room to room
carrying in hand a knife well-honed for cutting stem or root
or wick eyes open
to abalone shells memorial candle flames
split lemons roses laid
along charring logs Gorgeous things
: : dull acres of developed land as we had named it: Nowhere
wetland burnt garbage looming at its heart
gen-metal thicket midnightblue blood and
tricking masks I thought I knew
history was not a novel (….)

35.)

Shipwreck
By Michelle Chan Brown

What we heard about thirst was true.
Everywhere, water. Everywhere, salt.
And we drank it. We learned to love
our crumpling bones. Each sunspot
on our skin deserved a christening.
Distance gifted the world a shimmer. (….)

36.)

American Life in Poetry: Column 367

BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE

I’ve lived on the Great Plains all my life, and if I ever left this region for too long, I would dearly miss it. This lovely poem by Carol Light, who lives in Washington state, reminds me of that.

Prairie Sure

Would I miss the way a breeze dimples
the butter-colored curtains on Sunday mornings,
or nights gnashed by cicadas and thunderstorms?
The leaning gossip, the half-alive ripple
of sunflowers, sagging eternities of corn (….)

37.) Poets Laureate of the U.S.A.

A Net-annotated list of all the poets who have served the Library of Congress as Consultant (the old title) or Poet Laureate Consultant (the new title). Biographies & general reference sites are linked to the poets’ names — for the recent Laureates these are our own poet profiles with book-buying links at the bottom. Many of the other linked biographies are pages from the Academy of American Poets’ Find a Poet archive, a growing & invaluable resource. If there is no general information site about the poet, we have searched the Net for sample poems or other writings or recordings & listed those below the poet’s name.

Joseph Auslander 1937-41
Allen Tate 1943-44
Robert Penn Warren 1944-45
Louise Bogan 1945-46
Karl Shapiro 1946-47
Robert Lowell 1947-48
Leonie Adams 1948-49
Elizabeth Bishop 1949-50
Conrad Aiken 1950-52 (First to serve two terms)
William Carlos WilliamsAppointed to serve two terms in 1952 but did not serve — for more on this & other Laureate controversies see the history in Jacket magazine.
Randall Jarrell 1957-58
Robert Frost 1958-59
Richard Eberhart 1959-61
Louis Untermeyer 1961-63
Howard Nemerov 1963-64
Reed Whittemore 1964-65
Stephen Spender 1965-66
James Dickey 1966-68
William Jay Smith 1968-70
William Stafford 1970-71
Josephine Jacobsen 1971-73
Daniel Hoffman 1973-74
Stanley Kunitz 1974-76
Robert Hayden 1976-78
William Meredith 1978-80
Maxine Kumin 1981-82
Anthony Hecht 1982-84
Robert Fitzgerald 1984-85 Appointed and served in a health-limited capacity, but did not come to the Library of Congress
Reed Whittemore 1984-85 Interim Consultant in Poetry
Gwendolyn Brooks 1985-86
Robert Penn Warren 1986-87 First to be designated Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry
Richard Wilbur 1987-88
Howard Nemerov 1988-90
Mark Strand 1990-91
Joseph Brodsky 1991-92
Mona Van Duyn 1992-93
Rita Dove 1993-95
Robert Hass 1995-97
Robert Pinsky 1997-2000
Stanley Kunitz 2000-2001
Billy Collins 2001-2003
Louise Glück 2003-2004
Ted Kooser 2004-2006
Donald Hall 2006-2007
Charles Simic 2007-2008
Kay Ryan 2008-2010
M.S. Merwin 2010-Present

38.)

Historical List of Vermont Poets Laureate

November 4, 2011-Present: Sydney Lea, Newbury (b. December 22, 1942)
July 26, 2007-November 3, 2011:
Ruth Stone, Goshen (b. June 8, 1915)
March 5, 2003 – July 25, 2007: Grace Paley, Thetford (b. December 11, 1922, d. August 22, 2007 of breast cancer)
1999-2002: Ellen Bryant Voigt, Cabot (b. May 9, 1943)
1994-1998: Louise Glück, Cambridge, MA (b. April 22, 1943)
1989-1993: Galway Kinnell, Sheffield (b. February 1, 1927)
July 22, 1961-1963: Robert Frost, Ripton (b. March 26, 1874, d. January 29, 1963 of pulmonary embolism)

Position History:
 According to a February 7, 2003 press release from the Vermont Arts Council, “Robert Frost was declared Poet Laureate in 1961 [upon the adoption of Joint House Resolution 54 by the General Assembly]. In 1988 Governor Kunin re-established the position. (Reference: Executive Order No 69, 1988) Galway Kinnell was the first State Poet named for a term of 4 years as a result of this order in 1989.” The Arts Council further notes that “at the direction of the Governor [it] conducts the selection process for the State Poet by convening an advisory/selection panel. The Vermont State Poet is a person whose primary residence is in Vermont; whose poetry manifests a high degree of excellence; who has produced a critically acclaimed body of work; and who has a long association with Vermont.”

39.)

Historical list of United States Poets Laureate from Vermont

1958-1959: Robert Frost, Ripton (b. March 26, 1874, d. January 29, 1963 of pulmonary embolism)
August, 2003-2004: Louise Glück, Cambridge, MA (b. April 22, 1943)

40.)

Historical List of New Hampshire Poets Laureate

March 2004 – Present: Charles E. Butts
January 2006 – March 2009: Patricia Fargnoli
March 2004 – December 2005: Cynthia Huntington
October, 1999 – March 2004: Marie Harris, Barrington
December 1995 – March 1999: Donald Hall, Wilmot
January 1995 – March 1999: Jane Kenyon, Wilmot
March 1989 – March 1994: Maxine Kumin, Warner
June, 1984 – January 1989: Donald Hall, Danbury
January 1979 – January 1984: Richard G. Eberhart, Hanover
August 1972 – December 1978: Eleanor Vinton, Concord
September 1968 – July 1972: Paul Scott Mowrer

41.)

Historical list of United States Poets Laureate from New Hampshire

2007-2008: Charles Simic, Strafford
2006-2007: Donald Hall, Wilmot
1981-1982: Maxine Kumin, Warner
1959-1961: Richard Eberhart
1958-1959: Robert Frost, Derry

42.)

All Past National Book Critics Circle Award Winners and Finalists

Every year, the National Book Critics Circle presents awards for the finest books published in English. Below are the past winners and finalists for all National Book Critics Circle annual awards, from 1975 to present.

43.) If you ever have a need to contact me, here’s how to go about doing so:

Ronald Lewis:
Phone: 802-247-5913
Cell: 802-779-5913
Home: 1211 Forest Dale Road, Brandon, VT 05733
Email: vtpoet@gmail.com

44.) VERMONT LITERARY JOURNALS

1) The Queen City Review

The QCR is also on FacebookBurlington College’s The Queen City Review is a yearly journal of art and literature and accepts the work of new and established writers and artists in the areas of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, memoir, photography, and fine art, as well as essays and criticism on all aspects of the aforementioned. They seek to publish high quality work that ranges 3) broadly in topic and genre.

The Queen City Review can be purchased by 2-year subscription or individually. The price of one issue is $8 plus shipping charges ($1) for a total of $9. Subscriptions can be purchased for $14 plus shipping charges ($2) and includes the Fall 2010 and upcoming 2011 issues. Copies can also be purchased in the Writing Center or at the front desk. They accept cash, check, and credit cards (Visa and Mastercard). You can mail your payment to them or by calling (802) 862-9616 ext. 234 to place your order over the phone. If mailing your payment, mail details to:

ATTN: Heidi Berkowitz Sadler
Faculty, Interdisciplinary Studies
Coordinator, The Writing Center
Editor, The Queen City Review
Burlington College
95 North Avenue
Burlington, VT 05401

If you have any further questions, you can contact Heidi at:
T: 802-862-9616
E: hsadler@burlington.edu

2) Bloodroot

Bloodroot is a nonprofit literary magazine dedicated to publishing diverse voices through the adventure of poetry, short fiction, and creative nonfiction. Their aim is to provide a platform for the free-spirited emerging and established writer.

The price of a single issue is $8.

Editor, “Do” Roberts
Bloodroot Literary Magazine
PO Box 322
Thetford Center, VT 05075
(802) 785-4916
email: bloodroot@wildblue.net

3) New England Review

A publication of Middlebury College, a high quality literary magazine that continues to uphold its reputation for publishing extraordinary, enduring work. NER has been publishing now for over 30 years.

Cost: $10 for a single current issue
$30 for a single year (4 issues)
$50 for two years (8 issues)

New England Review
Attn: Orders
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753

Email: NEReview@middlebury.edu
(800) 450-9571

4) Willard & Maple

A Literary and Fine Art Magazine of Champlain College, Burlington.

Willard & Maple
163 South Willard Street
Freeman 302, Box 34
Burlington, VT 05401

email: willardandmaple@champlain.edu

5) Vermont Literary Review

A Literary and Fine Art Magazine of Castleton State College, Castleton.

The first issue of Vermont Literary Review was published in 1994. The review is published once a year. Work featured in the review includes poetry, fiction, drama, and personal essays from and about New England.

From its inception until 2006, students and professors reviewed the work submitted and selected work to be published. They used to jointly edit and design the review as well. After a brief lapse, the Vermont Literary Review has resumed publication in 2008 as a journal edited and designed solely by English Department faculty. The Literary Club, which used to help create this journal, is now putting out a publication of student work. (….)

6) Green Mountains Review


A Literary and Fine Art Magazine of Johnson State College, Johnson; in publication since 1987. One of two literary journals published by the college, the other being The Gihon River Review (below).

The Green Mountains Review is an international journal publishing poems, stories, and creative nonfiction by both well-known authors and promising newcomers. The magazine also features interviews, literary criticism, and book reviews. Neil Shepard is the general editor and poetry editor of the Green Mountains Review. The fiction editor is Leslie Daniels.

The editors are open to a wide range of styles and subject matter. If you would like to acquaint yourself with some of the work that we have accepted in the past, then we encourage you to order some of our back issues (….)

7) The Gihon River Review

“The name of the second river is Gihon. No sooner has it come out of Paradise than it vanishes beneath the depths of the sea . . .” -Moses Bar Cepha

The Gihon River Review, published biannually, was founded in the fall of 2001 as a production of the BFA program at Johnson State College. Issues are $5 each. Submissions in poetry, fiction, and nonfiction are read from September to May. Poetry submissions may not exceed five poems; fiction and nonfiction may not exceed twenty-five pages. Send all correspondence to The Gihon River Review, Johnson State College, Johnson, Vermont 05656. Please enclose a SASE. For further info by email, grr@jsc.vsc.edu.

8) Burlington Poetry Journal

The Burlington Poetry Journal is a new nonprofit publication interested in creating a means for provoking opinions, ideas, and thoughtful responses for poets in the Greater Burlington area. The Burlington Poetry Journal is an independent publication that is dedicated to the concept that art should be free and accessible to everyone. In a world with so many voices we believe in a community based, eclectic approach to the publication of poetry. Therefore, the BPJ will always welcome any form or style within its pages.

While there are numerous outlets for writers to gather and share privately in Vermont, there is no publication that brings together poetry of all styles and writers of all ages for the enjoyment of the general public. It is our hope that this journal will inspire writers to share their work with others who may be unaware of their talent, and for those who have never considered themselves writers to try their hand at poetry. We invite you to submit your work and share with others your thoughts and abilities with the Burlington community. The work you share will produce a dialogue as writers become aware of each other and begin to expose themselves and others to new poetry. The eclectic nature of the Burlington Poetry Journal will serve to stimulate its readers and authors. They are currently working towards achieving a non-profit 501(c)3 status.

9) Tarpaulin Sky

Founded in 2002 as an online literary journal, Tarpaulin Sky took the form of 12.5 internet issues (see the archive) before its first paper edition in November 2007, and the magazine continues to publish new work both online and in print. In addition to these issues, Tarpaulin Sky publishes work by individual authors in its “chronic content” section, as well as online-only book reviews

Tarpaulin Sky focuses on cross-genre / trans-genre / hybrid forms as well as innovative poetry and prose. The journal is not allied with any one style or school or network of writers; rather, we try to avoid some of the defects associated with dipping too often into the same literary gene pool, and the diversity of our contributors is evidence of our eclectic interests (….)

10) The Mountain Review

Colchester High School’s English Department has been publishing an interesting literary magazine: The Mountain Review. The Mountain Review is sponsored by the Vermont Council of Teachers of English Language Arts (VCTELA). Generally, the mission is to publish work from Vermont students, K-12. The Mountain Review has published poems, essays, short stories, excerpts from larger works, and art work. Wayland Cole and Katie Lenox have been the editors for several years; both teach at Colchester. Before them, Shelia Mable, a South Burlington teacher, was the editor for many years.

2009’s Mountain Review is over 100 pages long!

Students at all Vermont schools can enter the competition to be published in the Mountain Review. If you have questions, feel free to call them at (802) 264-5700 or email at colew@csdvt.org or lenoxk@csdvt.org. Send orders for copies of The Mountain Review to Katie Lenox at: Colchester High School, PO Box 900, Colchester, VT 05446. Send $5 per book; $2 postage to ship 1-3 books. Checks payable to the VCTELA.

11) The Salon: A Journal of Poetry & Fiction

The Honeybee Press is a brand-new writer’s cooperative based in Burlington, Vermont. The first book from the press is its bi-annual literary magazine, The Salon: A Journal of Poetry & Fiction. The goal of the press is to produce high-quality local literature and make it more affordable and visible to the public. To submit to The Salon, see the guidelines listed on its web address.

  • Click on link for submission guidelines.

12) Hunger Mountain

Hunger Mountain is both a print and online journal of the arts. We publish fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, visual art, young adult and children’s writing, writing for stage and screen, interviews, reviews, and craft essays. Our print issue comes out annually in the fall, and our online content changes on a regular basis. (….)

Hunger Mountain Subscriptions

Vermont College of Fine Arts
36 College Street
Montpelier, VT 05602

Subscription Prices
One Year $12.00
Two Year $22.00
Four Year $40.00 (Save $8!)
Back issues $8.00

13) The Onion River Review

The Onion River Review is a literary journal whose annual edition features poetry, prose, and visual arts. The Onion River Review is edited by the students of Saint Michael’s College in Vermont, and is committed to publishing work from students, faculty, staff, alumni, and the greater community.

The Onion River ReviewWilliam Marquess, Advisor
One Winooski Park #171
Colchester, VT 05439

14) Route Seven – The St. Albans Literary Guild Magazine

The first issue of the Saint Albans Literary Guild’s magazine, Route Seven: A Vermont Literary Journal, is a 56-page publication featuring new and established writers and artists with an emphasis on Northwestern Vermont writers. Strong literary and non-fiction voices from other regions are also featured and are encouraged to submit to future issues.

ST. ALBANS: The Saint Albans Literary Guild is proud to announce the release of the premiere issue of Route 7, a new Vermont literary journal, on Sat., Feb. 20, at the STAART Gallery in St. Albans. The event will feature readings from contributing authors, as well as hors d’oeuvres and beverages.
Route 7 is a 56-page magazine featuring fiction, non-fiction, humor, poetry, and artwork. The first issue includes a wide range of moods, from the introspective and idyllic to the offbeat and humorous. The more than 20 contributors included hail from Franklin County, and across Vermont and New Hampshire. The magazine aims to highlight creative voices from across the region. (….)

15) Vantage Point

Vantage Point is the arts and literary journal at the University of Vermont. VP is a student-run journal, supported by generous funding from the Student Government Association at UVM, which allows them to circulate the journal to students and the general public for free. They also receive funding from the Mary Brigham Buckham Fund, through UVM’s English Department.

Vantage Point was established in 2002 by a group of students in the Honors College who felt that UVM needed a literary journal. In the past, they have published strictly student work, however this past semester they opened up the submission pool to faculty and to the general public. They are continuing to go that route this semester as well.

16) est

est is a publication of literary and visual art.

It serves as an outlet for creative people to share their work freely with others.

With technology affirming its ever-present role in media and communication, it can be difficult to find an alternative that is as accessible and timely. Contrary to the endless supply of self proclaimed material from bloggers and youtubers, est works to sustain the precious art form of a handmade publication. All issues are of a limited edition and offer a unique perspective on the fears, humor and sensitivities of our world. Peer revision and interactive projects at the release events also help introduce and network contributors with each other. Past issues of est feature poetry, short fiction, drawing, photography, comics, DIY instructions and interactive projects. Each edition of 100 zines are hand numbered and bound by a pamphlet stitch.

Hard copies are available at select retailers as well as online via mail order. 
Subscriptions are also available.

est is available for viewing and purchase at these locations:

Speaking Volumes – Burlington, VT
Boutilier’s – Burlington, VT
Battery Street Jeans – Burlington, VT
Earth Prime Comics – Burlington, VT
Village Wine & Coffee – Shelburne, VT
Brown Dog Books – Hinesburg, VT

Direct correspondence to Heather Bischoff, Solicitor/Editor, at estpress@gmail.com

45.)

VERMONT LITERARY GROUPS’ ANTHOLOGIES

1) Vermont Voices, An Anthology

Published by the League of Vermont Writers periodically. They have just published their 3rd anthology.

  • Vermont Voices I (published in 1991)
  • Vermont Voices II (published in 1995)
  • Vermont Voices III (published in 1999)

2) *See Below

Published by the Otter Creek Poets periodically. They have just published their 3rd volume.

  • By the Waterfall (published in 1999)
  • Maps and Voyages (published in 2004)
  • Line By Line (published in 2006)

No web site to date. All editions and issues out of print and no longer available.

3) League of Vermont Writers

Published by the Mad River Poets periodically. They have just published their 3rd volume.

  • Pebbles from the Stream (published in 2002)
  • Maps and Voyages (published in 2004)
  • Line By Line (published in 2006)

4) The Mountain Troubadour

  • Published by the Poetry Society of Vermont annually.

46.) VERMONT POETRY BLOGS

1) PoemShape

Patrick Gillespie maintains a bright, intelligent blog. There is a decided bias in favoring poetry that is written in meter, that uses form, or that plays with language in ways that separate poetry from prose – rhetoric, imagery, simile, metaphor, conceit, rhyme, meter — Traditional Poetry.

PoemShape is now the home of the Vermont Poetry Newsletter & Poetry Event Calendar.

One can subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new postings by email.

47.)

STATE POETRY SOCIETY

The Poetry Society of Vermont, founded in 1947, is an association of poets and supporters who join in promoting an interest in poetry through meetings, workshops, readings, contests, and contributions to the society’s chapbook. Anyone may join the society including high school and college students and non-residents of Vermont. We welcome both writers and appreciative readers.Membership in PSOV

Benefits:
  • 2 luncheon/ workshops a year where a professional poet critiques your poems
  • one hands- on writing workshop and reading under the direction of a professional poet
  • the opportunity to enter contests judged by professional poets and to win awards
  • fellowship with appreciative readers and writers of poetry
  • opportunity for publication in the PSOV chapbook, The Mountain Troubadour
How to join:
mail dues of $20.00 to Membership Chairman, P.O. Box 1215, Waitsfield, VT 05673
include your name, mailing address, telephone, and e-mail address for Membership List
memberships are renewed by January 1 of each year
The PSOV has 2 current books available for sale:
1) The Mountain Troubadour – 2010 – Curl up with interesting, award-winning poetry from a wonderful group of poets. This book is only $8 (+$1 to mail). To get yourself a copy, call or write to Betty Gaechter, 134 Hitzel Terrace, Rutland, VT 05701, 773-8679. This little booklet may be just the thing to get you involved with the PSOV for a lifetime of friendships.
2) Brighten the Barn – 60th Anniversary Anthology – 1947-2007 – An Anthology of Poems by Members of the Poetry Society of Vermont. 99 pages of quality poetry; that’s a lot of beautiful poetry for only $12. If you get it through me (Ron Lewis), it’s only $12. If you want it shipped to you, the PSOV wants an extra amount to cover tax and shipping ($0.72 + $3.00). This book retails for $15, but a reduced price is now in play to unload the few remaining copies.

48.) YEAR-ROUND POETRY WORKSHOPS IN VERMONT


BELLOWS FALLS

1) Great River Arts Institute – See details elsewhere in this newsletter

2) Poetry Workshop at Village Square Booksellers with Jim Fowler (no relation to owner Pat). The goal of this course is to introduce more people to the art of writing poetry and will include a discussion of modern poetry in various forms and styles. Each week, the course will provide time to share and discuss participant’s poetry. Poetry Workshops on Monday mornings (9:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m.) – Jim Fowler’s sessions continue, with periodic break for a few weeks between sessions. Students should bring a poem and copies to the first class. The course will be limited to 5 to 8 students to allow adequate time to go through everyone’s poetry contributions and will meet in the café at Village Square Booksellers. James Fowler, of Charlestown, New Hampshire, has a Masters Degree in Environmental Science with a major in Nature Writing. He was the editor of Heartbeat of New England, a poetry anthology. Fowler has been widely published since 1998 in such journals as Connecticut Review, Quarterly of Light Verse, and Larcom Review. Fowler is a founding member of the River Voices Writer’s Circle, and a regular reader at Village Square Booksellers-River Voices Poetry Readings. The fee for this 6-week Workshop is $100, payable to Mr. Fowler at the first class. Pre-registration for the Poetry Workshop is suggested and may be made by calling Village Square Booksellers at 802-463-9404 or by email at vsbooks@sover.net or jfowler177@comcast.net.

3) InkBlot Complex Poetry Workshop runs through the Vermont Independent Media’s Media Mentoring Project and is held at the Rockingham Public Library at 65 Westminster Street in Bellows Falls. No previous writing or journalism experience or even class attendance is required. Participants are invited to bring a project or share successful techniques. The workshop aims to lift poetry from the page and reveal how it is a living force in daily life. Originally taught at the University of Illinois at Chicago to great acclaim, its interactive nature and inclusion of multiple art forms leaves dry, academic notions of poetry behind. It functions through three tenets: 1) Presentation of the art form as a living element of our daily world, 2) individualized, personal enrichment and free range of expression for each student, and 3) artistic cultivation through unexpected means. Taught by seasoned arts journalist, cultural critic and poet Clara Rose Thornton, this free event explores the poetry we encounter all around us – in songs we hear, the ways we express ourselves, even the advertisements we see. In the final session students then create their own works with an increased sense of connection to the way words construct meaning. All materials are provided. Instructor Clara Rose Thornton is an internationally published film, wine and visual arts critic, music journalist, poet and former book and magazine editor. Her writings on culture and the arts have appeared nationally in Stop Smiling: The Magazine for High-Minded Lowlifes, Honest Tune: The American Journal of Jam and Time Out Chicago. Currently residing in an artists’ colony in Windham County, she acts as the biweekly arts columnist for the Rutland Herald, staff writer for Southern Vermont Arts & Living and a regular contributor to The Commons. A portfolio, bio and roster of writing and editing services can be found at www.clararosethornton.com. For more information about the Media Mentoring Project, visit www.commonsnews.org or call 246-6397. You can also write to Vermont Independent Media at P.O. Box 1212, Brattleboro, VT 05302.

For more on the InkBlot Complex Poetry Workshop, see description under Other Poetry Workshops in Vermont (Anywhere, VT).

BERLIN

The Wayside Poets, who share their poetry publicly from time to time, have been meeting irregularly for the past 25 years. They used to be called The Academy Street Poets. Membership is by invitation only. They meet now at the Wayside Restaurant & Bakery in Berlin. Members include Diane Swan, Sherry Olson, Carol Henrikson and Sarah Hooker. You can contact them through Sherry Olson at: solsonvt@aol.com or 454-8026.

BURLINGTON

The Cherry Lane Poets are a small group (7-8) of poets that meet on the first Thursday of every month. The membership has been kept to a minimum so that poets will have all the time they need during critiques. Each poet has been or is a member of another poetry critiquing group, so the information passed to each other is more professional than that of most poetry groups. The primary goal of this group is to polish their work, get it submitted, and have it published. Each member brings a new poem with them, with enough copies to pass around, and reads it aloud to the group; it gets critiqued by each member during the following month, and those critiques are presented at the next meeting. Regina Brault is the contact person, (802) 860-1018; membership is by invitation only.

The Burlington Poets Society, a group of “stanza scribblers” that express their love of verse, made up of UVM students and professors, have recently organized, meeting at the Fleming Museum at UVM in Burlington for their periodic “The Painted Word” series of poetry readings.

GUILFORD

The Johnson Writer’s Group, newly formed on January 26, 2011, meets weekly on Wednesday evenings from 7:00 to 9:00, at the Johnson Public Library on Railroad Street, in the front room. This is a free drop-in prompt writing group modeled after the Burlington Writing Group that’s been going strong for many years now. The writers themselves decide on a prompt and write for 20 minutes, followed by a go-around reading. They usually get in two writes depending on the group’s size. All genres and experience levels are welcomed and there really are no rules other than not interrupting folks while they are writing. They don’t really do much critiquing though some spontaneous reactions do occur! This group believes that it’s just good practice to show up and write for 40 minutes and share the writing if so inclined… Feel free to join this group on a perpetual basis or whenever you’re in town. Contact is Cynthia Hennard at (802) 363-5541 or (802) 730-8125.

JOHNSON

The Guilford Poets Guild, formed in 1998, meets twice a month to critique and support each other’s work. Their series of sponsored readings by well-known poets which began at the Dudley Farm, continues now at the Women and Family Life Center.

MIDDLEBURY

1.) The Otter Creek Poets offer a poetry workshop every Thursday afternoon, from 1:00 to 3:00 in the basement meeting room of the Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main Street, Middlebury. This workshop, the largest and oldest of its kind in the state, has been meeting weekly for 13 years. Poets of all ages and styles come for peer feedback, encouragement, and optional weekly assignments to get the poetry flowing. Bring a poem or two to share (plus 20 copies). The workshops are led by David Weinstock. There is considerable parking available behind the library, or further down the hill below that parking lot. For more information, call David at 388-6939 or Ron Lewis at 247-5913.

2) The Spring Street Poets. This group is by invite only and consists of six members, Jennifer Bates, Janet Fancher, Karin Gottshall, Ray Hudson, Mary Pratt and David Weinstock.

MONTPELIER: Vermont College of Fine Arts

Established in 1981, the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing Program was one of the first low-residency programs in the country. The Atlantic named it one of the top five low-residency programs nationwide. At each MFA in Writing residency, a renowned poetry or prose writer joins the program for a substantial portion of the residency. The author gives a reading and/or talk, meets with numerous students individually, and is available in many informal ways throughout the residency to interact with students. The College publishes Hunger Mountain: the VCFA Journal of the Arts and writers may choose to attend a summer residency in Slovenia, in lieu of Vermont.

PANTON

This town is the home of Leonard Gibbs and his Dead Creek Poets Society. Leonard Gibbs is a member of the Otter Creek Poets and Poetry Society of Vermont, is the Magister Ludi of The Dead Creek Poets’ Society. Leonard invites visitors to his web site, Quibbles.com, and subsequent comments for discussion; send him some of your poetry for free critiques! He’s really very good. Leonard’s email address is: ML_Len@Quibbles.org. Interesting responses to items Leonard has posed on his site may end up on the site itself.

Leonard also publishes the Poet’s Corner, a regular monthly column in the Addison Independent. The newspaper has recently informed Len that they would like to have more poetry published in their newspaper, so Len is asking poets from anywhere in Vermont to send him material for him to review for future articles in Poet’s Corner.

NORWICH

This group meets on the first Sunday of every month at the Norwich Library, 6:30 p.m.

SAINT ALBANS

The Saint Albans Literary Guild organizes author readings, classes on writing and literature, and other book related events. The Guild is sponsoring a new literary magazine featuring local writers. Finally, it promotes Vermont authors, book groups, writing groups, and literary events held in Franklin County and northwestern Vermont. Contact us for more information or join the Guild to become involved with literary endeavors in your area.

The first issue of the Saint Albans Literary Guild’s magazine, Route Seven: A Vermont Literary Journal, is a 56-page publication featuring new and established writers and artists with an emphasis on Northwestern Vermont writers. Strong literary and non-fiction voices from other regions are also featured and are encouraged to submit to future issues.

Contact them through their web site or through Jay Fleury, Guild President.

SPRINGFIELD

A Writer’s Group has started to meet at the Springfield Town Library on the fourth Monday of each month, from 7 to 8 pm. For more information, call 885-3108.

STOWE

There is another poetry workshop happening in Stowe, but unfortunately I know nothing much about this group. If you do, contact me!

WAITSFIELD

The Mad River Poets consists of a handful of poets from the Route 100 corridor. More on this group in the future.


49.)

OTHER POETRY WORKSHOPS IN VERMONT

BURLINGTON

Scribes in the making put pen to paper as part of an open verse-writing session at the Fletcher Free Library, 235 College Street. Contact information: 862-1094.

ANYWHERE, VERMONT

Revived for the 2009 academic year is the InkBlot Complex Poetry Workshop, designed for upper-elementary and high-school-age students, grades 7-12. The curriculum functions through three tenets:

  • Innovative presentation of the art form as a living element of our daily world
  • Individualized, personal enrichment and free range of expression for each student
  • Artistic cultivation through unexpected means

The workshop debuted at the University of Illinois at Chicago, during a three-week summer program, entitled Project C.H.A.N.C.E., for underprivileged sophomore and senior students from area high schools. It was a fantastic success, and the program director requested its return. With this encouragement, I decided to expand and adapt the workshop for various age levels, as an educational/arts supplement for after-school programs and enrichment programs and an arts elective for more traditional academic settings. The response has been wonderful. (…) Click on Typewriter for more…

WHITE RIVER JUNCTION

The Writer’s Center
58 Main Street, White River Junction, Vermont

Instructor: April Ossmann (author of Anxious Music, Four Way Books, 2007, writing, editing and publishing consultant, and former Executive Director of Alice James Books)

Info: (802)333-9597 or aprilossmann@hotmail.com and http://www.aprilossmann.com.

50.)

YEAR-ROUND POETRY WRITING CENTERS IN VERMONT

BURLINGTON

The Burlington Writer’s Group (BWG) meets on Tuesday evenings from 7-9 PM and has a new home at the Unitarian Church in the church’s little white house off of Clark St., 2nd floor. They’d like to let people know and also invite anyone interested to join them whenever folks are in town or as often as they’d like.

The Burlington Writer’s Group is a free drop-in group. They decide on a prompt and write for 20 minutes, followed by a go-around reading. They can usually get in two writes depending on group size. All genres and experience levels are welcome and there really are no rules other than demonstrating courtesy while people are writing (don’t interrupt). They don’t do much critiquing though some spontaneous reactions occur. Mainly it’s good practice to just show up and write for 40 minutes and share the writing, if so inclined…

BURLINGTON

Women Writing for (a) Change supports the authentic experience of women who honor themselves through creative writing. Our community supports reflection as we move into our questions and awaken to change. Participants enhance expressive skills, strengthen their voices, deepen themselves as women as writers for positive change in all spheres of life. Creative writing in all genres is our shared vehicle. Women Writing for (a) Change is for women who, 1) dream of writing for self-discovery, for personal or social healing, 2) hunger for creative process in their lives, 3) yearn to explore their feminine voice, 4) crave reflective, space, and 5) are in transition. For more information, go to their web site at www.leagueofvermontwriters.org or contact Sarah Bartlett at either 899-3772 or sarah@womenwritingvt.com.

JOHNSON

Vermont Studio Center

Founded by artists in 1984, the Vermont Studio Center is the largest international artists’ and writers’ Residency Program in the United States, hosting 50 visual artists and writers each month from across the country and around the world.

The Vermont Studio Center offers four-to-twelve-week studio residencies year-round to 600 painters, sculptors, printmakers, photographers, and writers (50 residents per month). VSC’s 30-building campus is set on the banks of the Gihon River in rural Johnson, Vermont, a town of 3,000 located in the heart of the northern Green Mountains. Each Studio Center residency features undistracted working time, the companionship of fifty artists and writers from across the country and around the world, and access to a roster of prominent Visiting Artists and Writers. All residencies include comfortable housing, private studio space, and excellent food. Two Visiting Writers per month are in residence for one week each to offer readings, a craft talk, and optional conferences with each of the 10-14 writers in residence each month.

MONTPELIER

Vermont College of Fine Arts

Established in 1981, the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing Program was one of the first low-residency programs in the country. The Atlantic named it one of the top five low-residency programs nationwide. At each MFA in Writing residency, a renowned poetry or prose writer joins the program for a substantial portion of the residency. The author gives a reading and/or talk, meets with numerous students individually, and is available in many informal ways throughout the residency to interact with students. The College publishes Hunger Mountain: the VCFA Journal of the Arts and writers may choose to attend a summer residency in Slovenia, in lieu of Vermont.

SPRINGFIELD

A Writer’s Group has started to meet at the Springfield Town Library on the fourth Monday of each month, from 7 to 8 pm. For more information, call 885-3108.

WHITE RIVER JUNCTION

The Writer’s Center is for serious writers and nervous beginners. It’s for procrastinators who could benefit from regular deadlines – and for the prolific who could benefit from quality feedback. It’s for anyone with a manuscript hidden in a drawer, or a life story or poem waiting to be written. It’s for people who don’t know where to start or how to end. And for writers who are doing just fine on their own, but would like the company of other writers. The Writer’s Center is for anyone who is writing or wants to write. One of the Center’s consultants is April Ossman. Founded by Joni B. Cole and Sarah Stewart Taylor, the Writer’s Center offers instruction and inspiration through a selection of workshops, discussions, and community. We would love to see you – and your writing – at The Writer’s Center!

  • Prose‭! ‬Poetry‭! ‬Journaling‭! ‬Pitching‭! (‬I know‭! ‬I know‭! ‬F.‭ ‬Scott Fitzgerald said that using exclamation points is like laughing at your own joke‭… ‬but what’s wrong with that‭?!!!)

The Writer’s Center website is at‭ ‬www.thewriterscenterwrj.com

  • The Writer’s Center” has a new Facebook Page that we’re now using to spread the word about workshops, offer writing tips, share publishing news, etc. If you haven’t already, be a part of the page by following the link below and clicking “like”. Write on!


51.)

OTHER WRITING GROUPS IN VERMONT

1.) The League of Vermont Writers.

The League is open to all who make writing a part of their lives. We offer encouragement, motivation, and networking opportunities to writers with a broad range of writing experience.
You do not need to be published to join. Visit their Membership Page for more information about benefits and fees.
Founded in 1929, LVW’s mission is to:

  • Help writers develop their skills
  • Promote responsible and ethical writing and writing practices
  • Increase communication between professional writers and publishers
  • Promote an enduring appreciation for the power of the word

The LVW publishes Vermont Voices, An Anthology, at irregular times. They have published 3 separate volumes to date.

2) Write Action
Greater Brattleboro Area

Write Action is a community-based, grass-roots writer’s organization formed in 1999 “to strengthen a community of writers in Brattleboro and the surrounding area; and to nurture, encourage, and promote the literary arts in the at-large community”.

We exist because of an activist, vibrant base of writers in southeastern Vermont, and because of an engaged community of readers. In this, we feel very fortunate – Vermont is fertile ground for writers!

An important part of “strengthening a community of writers” is Write Action’s email newsletter. Now going out to over 300 people, the newsletter highlights literary events in the tri-state region. There are also updates on writing groups, and writer’s opportunities. Intrinsic to this effort are the open readings, held in various venues throughout the downtown, that take place several times a year. (….)

Contacting Write Action:

Write Action
P.O. Box 822
Brattleboro, Vt 05302

Or email us at: info@writeaction.org

Write Action Email Newsletter
If you are not now part of our email network, but would like to be, enabling you to receive notices about area readings, writing groups, and other literary opportunities and events, please send your email address to Eric Blomquist at WriteAction2004@aol.com, and you will be added to the subscriber list.

52.)

POETRY EVENT CALENDAR

Below please find the most current list of poetry happenings in Vermont for the near future. Please be aware that these events can be found on Poetz.com, but there is usually additional information that is typed here that would be cumbersome to place on Poetz.com. Please note all events are Vermont-based unless they are of extreme importance or happen to lie just outside our borders. If you would like to save on paper and ink, please just highlight what you need, or perhaps only events for the coming month, and print that information. All events are advertised as free unless indicated otherwise.

Thu, Apr 5: Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main Street, Middlebury, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Poet and singer/songwriter Laura Heaberlin will read from the discuss her new collection of poems for her Middlebury College thesis. For additional info, call David Weinstock 989-4314, or david.weinstock@gmail.com.

Same date and venue, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Brett Millier, Cook Professor of American Literature at Middlebury College, will discuss her new book, Jean Garrigue: A Critical Biography, about the 20th century American expatriate poet Jean Garrigue (1914-1972).

Fri, Apr 6: Newbury Elementary School, 214 Pulaski Street, Newbury, 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Vermont State Poet Laureate Sydney Lea reading with Jay Parini.

Sat, Apr 7: Brown Dog Books & Gifts, 22 Commerce Street, Hinesburg, 7:00 p.m. David Budbill. The author of Happy Life, a collection of poetic ruminations on New England life, kicks off National Poetry Month. Info, 482-5189.

Sat, Apr 7: Middlebury College, Dana Auditorium, 365 College Street, Middlebury, 1) 3:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. and 2) 8:00 p.m. – 10:30 p.m. Hirschfield Film Series: Poetry. A 60-something woman, faced with the discovery of a heinous family crime and in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease, finds strength and purpose when she enrolls in a poetry class. This latest film from South Korean director Chang-dong Lee won best screenplay at the Cannes Film Festival. In Korean with English subtitles. Sponsored by the Hirschfield International Film Series. Free. Info, Francisca Drexel, 443-3190.

Sun, Apr 8: Middlebury College, Axinn Center 232, Middlebury, 4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. In Memoriam: Adrienne Rich. Students and faculty discuss and read from the work of the late poet, who imagined a world without domination. Sponsored by the Women’s & Gender Studies Program and the Department of English and American Literatures. Open to the public; free. Info, 443-5937. (Axinn Center is in the old Starr Library.)

Tue, Apr 10: Kimball Public Library, 67 North Main Street, Randolph, 7:00 p.m. Vermont State Poet Laureate Sydney Lea reading. This event will include readings from Sydney’s own and others’ poetry, is called “Poetry: Another Way of Knowing.” It will explore poetry’s unique way of seeing the world from different perspectives at the same time.

Wed, Apr 11: Misty Valley Books, Main Street, On The Green, Chester, 7:00 p.m. The Pure Suit of Happiness with Michael Palma. Michael Palma, returning to Misty Valley Books on the Green in Chester, will consider the poetry of May Swenson and Robert Hayden on four Wednesday evenings (this is the 1st of four). The series, beginning April 11, is entitled The Pure Suit of Happiness, the name of a poem by Swenson. The free sessions will begin at 7 pm and last about an hour.

Palma, an acclaimed poet and translator, led the spellbinding and insightful discussions of Robert Frost’s poetry at Misty Valley Books in the summer of 2007 in a four-week series called Frost in July. Since then he has taken all comers on a tour of hell with Dante’s Inferno, a subject with which Palma is especially conversant as he has done a brilliant translation. In spring 2009, Palma talked about Emily Dickinson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Edwin Arlington Robinson, and his own poetry. Then it was Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Lowell, Wilfred Owen and Philip Larken, and W.H. Auden and Robert Browning.

This time, the series will feature readings from and discussions of the work of two underappreciated American poets whose centenaries are approaching, May Swenson (1913-1989) and Robert Hayden (1913-1980).

Born in Utah, May Swenson spent most of her life in the eastern United States. Her work is marked by exuberance, fascination with the world and everything in it, endless technical innovation, and irrepressible wit—as shown in the titles of several of her books: A Cage of Spines, Poems to Solve, and New and Selected Things Taking Place. She was also one of the first English translators of the most recent Nobel laureate, Tomas Tranströmer.

Marginalized for many years, Robert Hayden slowly emerged as one of the central poets of a rich generation. Quiet, serious, carefully crafted, and emotionally powerful, his work ranges from painful personal recollections (including the classic “Those Winter Sundays”) to historical narratives and spiritual meditations. He served two terms as Poetry Consultant to the Library of Congress (the position now known as Poet Laureate), the first African American to be so honored.

Books are available at the bookstore. Reservations appreciated (875-3400).

Wed, Apr 11: St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 1171 Main Street, St. Johnsbury, 7:00 p.m. F.D. Reeve. Noted poet F.D. Reeve discusses the intersection of poetry and prose in a work of fiction. Reeve will give examples of how the two genres meet, cross, and sometimes collide, and read from his new novella, “Nathaniel Purple.” Books will be available for sale to benefit the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. This event is part of our National Library Week celebration.Info, 748-8291, inform@stjathenaeum,org.

Wed, Apr 11: Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main Street, Brattleboro, 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. An Evening of Poetry. Poets Tim Mayo, Jeff Friedman, and Lucas Farrell present an evening of poetry at Brooks Memorial Library in the meeting room.

Tim Mayo’s poems and reviews have appeared in Atlanta Review, The Brattleboro Reformer, 5 AM, Poetry International, Poet Lore, River Styx, Web Del Sol Review, Verse Daily, Verse Wisconsin and The Writer’s Almanac among many other places. His first full length collection The Kingdom of Possibilities was published by Mayapple Press in 2009. He has been twice nominated for the Best of the Net Anthology, three times for a Pushcart Prize as well as chosen as a top finalist for the Paumanok Award. He is on the author committee of the Brattleboro Literary Festival. Lucas Farrell is the author of The Many Woods of Grief (University of Massachusetts Press, 2011), which was winner of the 2010 Juniper Prize for Poetry. His poems, stories, and essays have appeared in Boston Review, Jubilat, Poetry Daily, DIAGRAM, Mid-American Review and elsewhere. He and his wife run a small goat dairy and confectionery in Townshend, VT. Jeff Friedman is the author of five collections of poetry: Working in Flour (Carnegie Mellon University Press, 2011), Black Threads (Carnegie Mellon University Press, 2007), Taking Down the Angel (Carnegie Mellon University Press, 2003), Scattering the Ashes (Carnegie Mellon University Press, 1998), and The Record-Breaking Heat Wave (BkMk Press-University of Missouri-Kansas City, 1986). His poems, mini stories and translations have appeared in many literary magazines, including American Poetry Review, Poetry, 5 AM, New England Review, Poetry International, Quick Fiction, North American Review, Ontario Review, Antioch Review, Agni Online, Boulevard, Prairie Schooner, and The New Republic. A contributing editor to Natural Bridge, he lives in West Lebanon with the artist Colleen Randall and their dog Bekka. Info, 254-5290.

Thu, Apr 12: Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main Street, Middlebury, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. James Hayford, Jr., son of Vermont poet Jim Hayford (1913-1993), a protégé of Robert Frost, will discuss his father’s life and work and take questions. For additional info, call David Weinstock 989-4314, or david.weinstock@gmail.com.

Thu, Apr 12: Willey Library & Learning Center, Ellsworth Room, Johnson State College, 337 College Hill, Johnson, 4:00 p.m. Poetry Jam. Love jazz? Love poetry? Come listen to the smooth sounds of jazz as its phrasing punctuates the phrasing of the poets’ words, in the annual Multi-Lingual Poetry Jam. Info, Victoria Chase at 635-1356, Victoria.Chase@jsc.edu.

Thu, Apr 12: Putney Public Library, 55 Main Street, Putney, 7:00 p.m.

Poetry reading: Chard deNiord, Kate Gleason and Julia Crane. Chard deNiord is the author of four books of poetry, The Double Truth (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2011), Night Mowing (The University of Pittsburgh Press, 2005), Sharp Golden Thorn (Marsh Hawk Press, 2003), and Asleep in the Fire (University of Alabama Press, 1990). His book of essays and interviews with seven senior American poets (Galway Kinnell, Ruth Stone, Lucille Clifton, Donald Hall, Robert Bly, Jack Gilbert, and Maxine Kumin) titled Sad Friends, Drowned Lovers, Stapled Songs, Conversations and Reflections on Twentieth Century American Poets was published in December by Marick Press. He is the cofounder of the New England College MFA Program in Poetry and an associate professor of English at Providence College. He lives in Putney, Vermont with his wife Liz. Kate Gleason is the author of Measuring the Dark (chosen by Phillis Levin as the winner of the First Book Award at Zone 3 Press) and two chapbooks of poetry. Her work has been published in Best American Poetry, Verse Daily, Los Angeles Times Book Review, Green Mountains Review, Crab Orchard Review, Rattle, Sonora Review, Worcester Review, and elsewhere. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA (in conjunction with the Ragdale Foundation), the Vermont Studio Center, and the NH Arts Council, she teaches writing workshops and runs a literary submitting service. Julia Crane is the author of Twisted Little Love Stories (Finishing Line Press, 2012). Her poems have appeared in Anthropaphogy, Blood Lotus, Boulevard, Diner, 5AM, Mad Poets Review, Paper Street, Winterhawk Press, and elsewhere. She holds an MFA in Writing and Literature from the Bennington Writing Seminars and is an affiliate Professor of Liberal Studies in the BA Program at the Vermont Academic Center of Union Institute and University. She lives in Vermont. Info, 387-4407.

Sat, Apr 14: Village Square Books, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. 2nd Saturday Open Mic – Poetry & Prose. Open Mic hosted by the River Voices. Read your own poetry or short story (1-2 pages), read from a favorite book or just listen to poetry. Refreshments. Call for a reservation. Info, 463-9404.

Sat, Apr 14: Northshire Bookstore, 4869 Main Street, Manchester, 3:00 p.m.

Poetry reading in celebration of National Poetry Month. Birchsong: Poetry Centered in Vermont, which was recently published by The Blueline Press in Danby, Vermont is having a followup to the publication, where some of the authors will be reading their own work from Birchsong, and more! All 92 poems, by 56 poets living in Vermont or closely connected with the state, whether narrative or reflective, open a window on a region of contradictions where natural beauty and neglect, wealth and poverty, often exist side by side. Edited by Alice Wolf Gilborn, Carol Cone, Brenda Nicholson, and Monica Stillman. Guest edited by Rob Hunter, who teaches English at Burr and Burton Academy in Manchester, and is the author of a book of poetry, September Swim. Birchsong’s colorful covers were painted by Burr and Burton’s art teacher, Betsy Hubner, who also did the interior artwork. Poets reading at the event include: Joe Bruchac and son Jesse(perform together),Rob Hunter, George Drew, E. D. Roberts, Ivy Schweitzer, Lené Gary, David Mook, Danny Dover, hyllis Katz, Carol Cone Florence Fogelin, Kim Ward, Jean Kreiling, Janice Miller Potter. This 128-page anthology is available from the Northshire Bookstore in Manchester Center, by calling 362-2200; the price is $15. Info, 362-3565.

Mon, Apr 16: Sherburne Library, River Road, Killington, 7:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Spring Gathering of Poets. Come and read a few poems of your own, share some of your favorites with others, or just come and listen to a dozen poets of central Vermont read in this friendly annual event. Refreshments at intermission. Info, Betty Little at 786-9920, Lauren Wilder at 299-1777 or vtkag@aol.com.

Tue, Apr 17: Pomerleau Alumni Center, St. Michael’s College, 1 Winooski Park, Colchester, 4:45 p.m. John Chamberlain. The 1980 St. Mike’s grad recites his poetry at the college’s annual alumni reading. Info, 654-2000.

Tue, Apr 17: Haybarn Theater at Goddard College, 123 Pitkin Road, Plainfield, 7:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. Poetry reading by Roger Bonair-Agard. Part of the BFA in Creative Writing Program’s Visiting Writer Series. Dubbed by Thomas Lux as “a poet of blue lightning and white hot passions,” Roger Bonair-Agard is a veteran of the spoken-word scene and a two-time National Poetry Slam Champion. Info, 454-8311.

Wed, Apr 18: Middlebury College, Carr Hall Lounge, Middlebury, 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Spoken Word Poetry Workshop. Join award-winning poet Roxy Azari for a dinner workshop on spoken word. Roxy Azari is an Iranian-American Spoken Word Artist who breathes, thinks, and dreams of poetry and social change. In 2006, she won both the New York Knicks Poetry Slam and the Urban Word NYC Poetry Slam. In 2010 Roxy was awarded the distinguished Thomas J. Watson Fellowship, which enabled her to provide poetry and performance workshops for young women in the Middle East, North Africa and South-East Asia. RSVP is requested. Please email Karen Liu at kliu@middlebury.edu. Info, Jennifer Herrera, 443-5743.

Wed, Apr 18: Misty Valley Books, Main Street, On The Green, Chester, 7:00 p.m. The Pure Suit of Happiness with Michael Palma. Michael Palma, returning to Misty Valley Books on the Green in Chester, will consider the poetry of May Swenson and Robert Hayden on four Wednesday evenings (this is the 2nd of four). The series, beginning April 11, is entitled The Pure Suit of Happiness, the name of a poem by Swenson. The free sessions will begin at 7 pm and last about an hour.

Palma, an acclaimed poet and translator, led the spellbinding and insightful discussions of Robert Frost’s poetry at Misty Valley Books in the summer of 2007 in a four-week series called Frost in July. Since then he has taken all comers on a tour of hell with Dante’s Inferno, a subject with which Palma is especially conversant as he has done a brilliant translation. In spring 2009, Palma talked about Emily Dickinson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Edwin Arlington Robinson, and his own poetry. Then it was Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Lowell, Wilfred Owen and Philip Larken, and W.H. Auden and Robert Browning.

This time, the series will feature readings from and discussions of the work of two underappreciated American poets whose centenaries are approaching, May Swenson (1913-1989) and Robert Hayden (1913-1980).

Born in Utah, May Swenson spent most of her life in the eastern United States. Her work is marked by exuberance, fascination with the world and everything in it, endless technical innovation, and irrepressible wit—as shown in the titles of several of her books: A Cage of Spines, Poems to Solve, and New and Selected Things Taking Place. She was also one of the first English translators of the most recent Nobel laureate, Tomas Tranströmer.

Marginalized for many years, Robert Hayden slowly emerged as one of the central poets of a rich generation. Quiet, serious, carefully crafted, and emotionally powerful, his work ranges from painful personal recollections (including the classic “Those Winter Sundays”) to historical narratives and spiritual meditations. He served two terms as Poetry Consultant to the Library of Congress (the position now known as Poet Laureate), the first African American to be so honored.

Books are available at the bookstore. Reservations appreciated (875-3400).

Thu, Apr 19: Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main Street, Middlebury, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Playwright Noah Mease will speak about “Green Eden,” which he debuted at Middlebury’s Hepburn Zoo Theater in 2011. The play is inspired by the true story of Spanish poet Federico García Lorca’s 10-day visit with Philip Cummings at Lake Eden, Vermont, in august 1929, and the repercussions of that visit on Cumming’s later life. For additional info, call David Weinstock 989-4314, or david.weinstock@gmail.com.

Sun, Apr 22: Misty Valley Books, Main Street, On The Green, Chester, 7:00 p.m. In celebration of National Poetry Month, local poets John Wood and Michael Palma read from their own works.

Michael Palma’s own poetry has been published in three books and numerous periodicals and anthologies. His latest book is entitled A Fortune in Gold. Awarded prizes for his translations from the Academy of American Poets and Columbia University, Palma has collaborated with the National Endowment for the Arts and has written several teacher and reader guides for the NEA’s Big Read program. He is also an essayist, editor, critic and translator of other Italian poets, and his Inferno translation was reisssued last year as a handsome Norton Critical Edition paperback. He lives with his wife, Victoria, in Bellows Falls

John Wood, as well as being a poet, is an art critic and photographic historian. Allen Ginsberg wrote the introduction to his first book, which was published when Wood was in his early twenties. His next two books, In Primary Light and The Gates of the Elect Kingdom, both won the University of Iowa Press Poetry Prize, and others of his books have been named to the Outstanding Books of the Year lists by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and the American Library Association. A new book of his poems accompanied by 19th century photographs has just been published in Germany, and he has written or edited over twenty-five books on photographic history and contemporary photographers. He has held professorships for over thirty years in both English Literature and Photographic History, and he has lectured and read at many universities both here and abroad. He lives with his wife, Carol, in Saxtons River, VT. 

Reception to follow.

Wed, Apr 25: Misty Valley Books, Main Street, On The Green, Chester, 7:00 p.m. The Pure Suit of Happiness with Michael Palma. Michael Palma, returning to Misty Valley Books on the Green in Chester, will consider the poetry of May Swenson and Robert Hayden on four Wednesday evenings (this is the 3rd of four). The series, beginning April 11, is entitled The Pure Suit of Happiness, the name of a poem by Swenson. The free sessions will begin at 7 pm and last about an hour.

Palma, an acclaimed poet and translator, led the spellbinding and insightful discussions of Robert Frost’s poetry at Misty Valley Books in the summer of 2007 in a four-week series called Frost in July. Since then he has taken all comers on a tour of hell with Dante’s Inferno, a subject with which Palma is especially conversant as he has done a brilliant translation. In spring 2009, Palma talked about Emily Dickinson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Edwin Arlington Robinson, and his own poetry. Then it was Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Lowell, Wilfred Owen and Philip Larken, and W.H. Auden and Robert Browning.

This time, the series will feature readings from and discussions of the work of two underappreciated American poets whose centenaries are approaching, May Swenson (1913-1989) and Robert Hayden (1913-1980).

Born in Utah, May Swenson spent most of her life in the eastern United States. Her work is marked by exuberance, fascination with the world and everything in it, endless technical innovation, and irrepressible wit—as shown in the titles of several of her books: A Cage of Spines, Poems to Solve, and New and Selected Things Taking Place. She was also one of the first English translators of the most recent Nobel laureate, Tomas Tranströmer.

Marginalized for many years, Robert Hayden slowly emerged as one of the central poets of a rich generation. Quiet, serious, carefully crafted, and emotionally powerful, his work ranges from painful personal recollections (including the classic “Those Winter Sundays”) to historical narratives and spiritual meditations. He served two terms as Poetry Consultant to the Library of Congress (the position now known as Poet Laureate), the first African American to be so honored.

Books are available at the bookstore. Reservations appreciated (875-3400).

Wed, Apr 25: University of Vermont (UVM), Angell Lecture Hall, Room B112, Burlington, 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Poetry reading by Reginald Dwayne Betts. The Fleming Museum presents The Painted Word poetry series, organized by Major Jackson, Professor, UVM Dept. of English. highlighting established and emerging New England poets, the program is a collaboration of the Fleming Museum of Art and the UVM Department of English with support from the James and Mary Brigham Buckham Fund. Reginald Dwayne Betts is a poet, memoirist, and teacher. He is author of A Question of Freedom: A Memoir of Learning, Survival, and Coming of Age in Prison (Penguin/Avery, 2009), and Shahid Reads His Own Palm (Alice James Books, 2010), winner of the 2010 Beatrice Hawley Award. He is a 2010 Soros Justice Fellow. His honors include a Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference scholarship and the Holden Fellowship to attend the M.F.A. program at Warren Wilson College. He is a Cave Canem Workshop fellow, and was a full scholarship student at the University of Maryland, where he earned his B.A. He currently teaches poetry with the DC Creative Writing Workshop at Hart Middle School.[3][4] According to USA Today, he is also the national spokesman for the Campaign for Youth Justice, and speaks out for juvenile-justice reform. He also visits detention centers and inner-city schools, and talks to at-risk young people. Angell Lecture Hall is connected to Cook Physical Science Hall and contains two lecture halls; you can see the building here: http://www.uvm.edu/~hp206/2007/marshall/angelllecturecenter/angell.html.

Thu, Apr 26: Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main Street, Middlebury, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Chloë Joan López, author of the chapbook Quodlibet and the upcoming Elixir Press prize volume Quelled Communiqués, will read and discuss her work. For additional info, call David Weinstock 989-4314, or david.weinstock@gmail.com.

Thu, Apr 26: Norwich Public Library, 368 Main Street, Norwich, 7:00 p.m. Vermont State Poet Laureate Sydney Lea reading.

Fri & Sat, Apr 27-28: Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main Street, Middlebury, 3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Poetry Workshop with Ted Scheu, That Poetry Guy. This is a Youth Services program open to children in grades 2-6, but parents/adults are free to watch and listen. Mr. Scheu is a master elementary teacher who has developed and run successful writing workshops for 12 years all over the US, including at many nearby NY schools. Ted Scheu’s goal and his track record is first and foremost to get children, grades K-5, excited about finding their own writers’ voices. His own energy and enthusiasm is infectious, and he works incredibly hard to encourage every child to succeed. Poetry, especially taught by Ted, is a great genre for promoting writing success, because the rules are flexible, and kids can actively use both their hearts and their imaginations. Ted Scheu makes sure that by the end of every workshop every child has a rough draft of a poem they are proud of sharing. Ted’s web site: http://www.poetryguy.com/.

Sat, Apr 28: Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main Street, Middlebury, 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. WordSpring: Poetry Out Loud. Lit lovers recite favorite poems for enthusiastic audiences. Info, 388-4095.

Wed, May 2: Williamstown Middle/High School, cafeteria, 120 Hebert Road, 6:00 p.m. Adventures in Poetry: “Efficient Novels,” New England Style. This reading and group discussion, led by poet Geof Hewitt, challenges participants’ perceptions of poetry with poems by contemporary New England writers. The goal is to increase each participant’s awareness of the quick and dirty, direct expression awaiting anyone who goes looking for a few good poems. Hosted by the Williamstown Middle/High School. Info, Kim Deslauriers, (802) 433-5350.

Wed, May 2: Misty Valley Books, Main Street, On The Green, Chester, 7:00 p.m. The Pure Suit of Happiness with Michael Palma. Michael Palma, returning to Misty Valley Books on the Green in Chester, will consider the poetry of May Swenson and Robert Hayden on four Wednesday evenings (this is the 4th of four). The series, beginning April 11, is entitled The Pure Suit of Happiness, the name of a poem by Swenson. The free sessions will begin at 7 pm and last about an hour.

Palma, an acclaimed poet and translator, led the spellbinding and insightful discussions of Robert Frost’s poetry at Misty Valley Books in the summer of 2007 in a four-week series called Frost in July. Since then he has taken all comers on a tour of hell with Dante’s Inferno, a subject with which Palma is especially conversant as he has done a brilliant translation. In spring 2009, Palma talked about Emily Dickinson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Edwin Arlington Robinson, and his own poetry. Then it was Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Lowell, Wilfred Owen and Philip Larken, and W.H. Auden and Robert Browning.

This time, the series will feature readings from and discussions of the work of two underappreciated American poets whose centenaries are approaching, May Swenson (1913-1989) and Robert Hayden (1913-1980).

Born in Utah, May Swenson spent most of her life in the eastern United States. Her work is marked by exuberance, fascination with the world and everything in it, endless technical innovation, and irrepressible wit—as shown in the titles of several of her books: A Cage of Spines, Poems to Solve, and New and Selected Things Taking Place. She was also one of the first English translators of the most recent Nobel laureate, Tomas Tranströmer.

Marginalized for many years, Robert Hayden slowly emerged as one of the central poets of a rich generation. Quiet, serious, carefully crafted, and emotionally powerful, his work ranges from painful personal recollections (including the classic “Those Winter Sundays”) to historical narratives and spiritual meditations. He served two terms as Poetry Consultant to the Library of Congress (the position now known as Poet Laureate), the first African American to be so honored.

Books are available at the bookstore. Reservations appreciated (875-3400).

Thu, May 10: Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, 8 River Road, Jericho, 6:30 p.m. Vermont State Poet Laureate Sydney Lea reading. Info, 899-4962.

Thu, May, 17: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Bernadette Mayer. Bernadette Mayer’s poetry has been praised by John Ashbery as “magnificent.” Brenda Coultas calls her a master of “devastating wit.” Mayer is the author of more than two dozen volumes of poetry, including Midwinter Day, Sonnets, The Desires of Mothers to Please Others in Letters, and Poetry State Forest. A former director of the Poetry Project at St. Mark’s Church in the Bowery and co-editor of the conceptual magazine 0 to 9 with Vito Acconci, Mayer has been a key figure on the New York poetry scene for decades.

Thu, May 10: 51 Main at The Bridge, Middlebury, 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Verbal Onslaught. Drawing from our Middlebury community of faculty, staff, students, local community members and other special guests, Verbal Onslaught adds dynamic poetic and cultural diversity to our vibrant town nestled between the Green Mountains and the Adirondacks. Shy and Outspoken Poets, Storytellers, Writers, Artists, and Listeners are more than welcome. Open to the public. Info, Sarah Franco, 443-5052.

Sat, May 12: Village Square Books, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. 2nd Saturday Open Mic – Poetry & Prose. Open Mic hosted by the River Voices. Read your own poetry or short story (1-2 pages), read from a favorite book or just listen to poetry. Refreshments. Call for a reservation. Info, 463-9404.

Wed, May 23: Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main Street, Brattleboro, 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

An Evening of Poetry II. Join poets Joan Aleshire, Meg Kearney, and Ellen Dudley for a reading of their work in the library’s meeting room. Happily, Joan Aleshire’s fifth book of poems, examines a childhood of privilege and difference in a remarkable Baltimore family during the 1940s and ‘50s. The collection offers vivid glimpses of 20th century history as it explores the trials, challenges and joys of relationships within the family and beyond that have influenced the developing consciousness of a particular self in the world [...] Poet Stephen Dobyns says, “Aleshire’s poems are as much sound as sense, and together they don’t so much talk about a vanished time as recreate it with all its many levels of actuality and gradations of emotion.” Meg Kearney’s Home By Now (Four Way Books 2009) was a finalist for the Paterson Poetry Prize and Foreword Magazine Book of the Year, and winner of the 2010 PEN New England LL Winship Award. She is author of An Unkindness of Ravens (BOA Editions 2001), and the novels-in-verse for teens The Secret of Me, (Persea Books 2005) and The Girl in the Mirror (Persea 2012). Meg’s story “Chalk” appears in Sudden Flash Youth: 65 Short Short Stories (Persea 2011). Her picture book, Trouper the Three-Legged Dog (Scholastic 2013), will feature illustrations by E.B. Lewis. Director of the Solstice Creative Writing Programs of Pine Manor College in Massachusetts, Meg was Associate Director of the National Book Foundation—sponsor of the National Book Awards—for more than 11 years. Her work has been featured on “A Writer’s Almanac” and appears in myriad anthologies. A native New Yorker, Meg lives in New Hampshire. Ellen Dudley is the author of Slow Burn ( Provincetown Arts Press, 1997) and The Geographic Cure (Four Way Books, 2007) Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in TriQuarterly, Agni, Massachusetts Review, The Poetry Miscellany, Phoebe, AQR and many other print and on-line journals. She is the winner of a Vermont Council on the Arts Fellowship as well as Fellowships to the Vermont Studio Center and Dorland Mountain Arts Colony. She has taught writing at the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth and as guest lecturer at the New School University, Emerson College, UC Irvine as well as at New Hampshire Writers Project and private workshops. She is founding editor/publisher of the Marlboro Review. She lives in Marlboro, Vermont, where she is co-owner of a construction company and in the district of Ka`u on the Big Island of Hawaii.Info, 254-5290.

Wed, May 23: Blake Memorial Library, 676 Village Road, East Corinth, 7:00 p.m. Bloodroot Literary Magazine readings. Info, 439-5338.

Thu, May, 31: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Donald Revell. Donald Revell has authored six collections of poetry, the most recent of which is There Are Three. His poems have appeared widely in journals and reviews, as have his essays. He has also published ALCOOLS, a translation of poems of Guillaume Apollinaire. His awards include two NEA Fellowships, a Guggenheim Fellowship, an Ingram-Merrill Fellowship, and several appearances in the Best American Poetry anthologies. Revell has taught at the Iowa Writers Workshop and currently teaches at the University of Utah.

Wed, Jun 6: Norman Williams Public Library, 10 South Park Street, Woodstock, 7:00 p.m. Poetry reading in celebration of National Poetry Month. Birchsong: Poetry Centered in Vermont, which was recently published by The Blueline Press in Danby, Vermont is having a followup to the publication, where some of the authors will be reading their own work from Birchsong, and more! All 92 poems, by 56 poets living in Vermont or closely connected with the state, whether narrative or reflective, open a window on a region of contradictions where natural beauty and neglect, wealth and poverty, often exist side by side. Edited by Alice Wolf Gilborn, Carol Cone, Brenda Nicholson, and Monica Stillman.

Sat, Jun 9: Village Square Books, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. 2nd Saturday Open Mic – Poetry & Prose. Open Mic hosted by the River Voices. Read your own poetry or short story (1-2 pages), read from a favorite book or just listen to poetry. Refreshments. Call for a reservation. Info, 463-9404.

Sun, Jun 10: Frost Stone House Museum, 121 Vt Route 7A, Shaftsbury, 2:00 p.m. Vermont State Poet Laureate Sydney Lea reading. Info, 447-6200.

Thu, Jun 14: Bent Northrop Memorial Library, 164 Park Street, Fairfield, 7:00 p.m. Vermont State Poet Laureate Sydney Lea reading. Info, 827-3945.

Thu, Jun 14: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Srikanth Reddy.

Srikanth Reddy grew up in Chicago. He is the author of two books of poetry, Facts for Visitors and Voyager, both published by the University of California Press. A scholarly study, Changing Subjects: Digressions in Modern American Poetry, is forthcoming from Oxford University Press. Reddy earned an MFA in creative writing from the University of Iowa and a PhD in English Literature from Harvard University, and he has received fellowships from the Whiting Foundation, the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, and the Mellon Foundation. Hi is currently an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Chicago.

Fri, Jun 15: Celebration of Expressive Arts in Montgomery House, Montgomery. Vermont State Poet Laureate Sydney Lea reading.

Thu, Jun 21: The Norwich Inn, 325 Main Street, Norwich, 7:00 p.m. Bloodroot Literary Magazine readings. Info, 649-1143.

Thu, Jun 28: Brookfield Old Town Hall, Brookfield, 7:00 p.m. Vermont State Poet Laureate Sydney Lea reading.

Mon, Jul 2: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Matthea Harvey.

Matthea Harvey is the author of Sad Little Breathing Machine (Graywolf, 2004) and Pity the Bathtub Its Forced Embrace of the HumanForm (Alice James Books, 2000). Her third book of poems, Modern Life (Graywolf, 2007) was a finalist for the National Book Critics CirlcleAward and a New York Times Notable Book. Her first children’s book, TheLittle General and the Giant Snowflake, illustrated by ElizabethZechel, was published byTin House Books in 2009. An illustrated erasure, titled Of Lamb, with images by Amy Jean Porter, will be published byMcSweeney’s in 2010. Matthea is a contributing editor to jubilat, Meatpaper and BOMB. She teaches poetry at Sarah Lawrence and lives in Brooklyn.

Sat, Jul 14: Village Square Books, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. 2nd Saturday Open Mic – Poetry & Prose. Open Mic hosted by the River Voices. Read your own poetry or short story (1-2 pages), read from a favorite book or just listen to poetry. Refreshments. Call for a reservation. Info, 463-9404.

Thu, Jul, 26: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Chris Abani. Chris Abani is the author of two novels: GraceLand and Masters of the Board. His poetry collections include Dog Woman, Daphne’s Lot and Kalakuta Republic. Abani is the recipient of the 2001 PEN USA Freedom-to-Write Award, the 2001 Prince Claus Award and a 2003 Lannan Literary Fellowship. He teaches in the MFA Program at Antioch University, and is a Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of California, Riverside.

Thu, Aug 9: Vermont Festival of the Arts, Joslin Memorial Library, 4391 Main Street, Waitsfield. Vermont State Poet Laureate Sydney Lea reading.

Thu, Aug, 9: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Jean Valentine.

Jean Valentine is the author of nine books of poetry, most recently Door in the Mountain, New & Collected Poems (Wesleyan University Press, 2004) which won the National Book Award for 2004. Earlier books are Dream Barker, winner of the Yale Series of Younger Poets in 1965, The River at Wolf (Alice James Books, 1992) and The Cradle of the Real Life (Wesleyan, 2002). Valentine has taught at Barnard College, Columbia U., Sarah Lawrence College, NYU, Hunter College, and the 92nd Street Y. She lives and works in New York City.

Thu, Aug 23: Strafford Meeting House, Strafford. Vermont State Poet Laureate Sydney Lea reading.

Mon, Aug 27: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Emmanuel Moses.

Emmanuel Moses was born in Casablanca in 1959, the son of a French-educated German Jew and a French Jew: an historian of philosophy and a painter. He spent his early childhood in France, lived in Israel from the ages of ten to eighteen, and then returned to Paris, where he still lives. He is the author of eight collections of poems, most recently L’Animal (Flammarion, 2010) and D’un perpetuel hiver (Gallimard 2009), and of six novels. He is a translator of contemporary Hebrew fiction and poetry, notably of Yehuda Amichai. He also translates from the German and from the English. Last News of Mr. Nobody, a collection of Moses’ poems translated into English by Kevin Hart, Marilyn Hacker, C. K. Williams and others, was published by The Other Press in 2005. He and I, a collection translated by Marilyn Hacker, was published by the Oberlin College Press FIELD Translation Series in 2009.

A polyglot whose experience of the world comes as much from travel and human intercourse as from books, from an interrogation of the past which coexists with his experience of the present, Emmanuel Moses is a kind of Poète sans frontières. While some contemporary French poets eschew geographical specificity, a perennial subject of Moses’ poems is the crossing and the porosity of actual borders, geographical and temporal. A (Proustian?) train of thought set in motion by the placement of a park bench, the stripe of sunlight on a brick wall, will move the speaker and the poem itself from Amsterdam to Jerusalem, from a boyhood memory to a 19th century chronicle, from Stendhal to the Shoah. A subtle irony permeates Moses’ work, even (or especially) at moments meant to be self-reflective or romantic, an irony applied to the events of history as readily as to the events of a single young or aging man’s life. It is clear in Moses’ poems as in his fiction that the macro-events of “history” are made up of the miniscule events individual existence, or must be perceived as such to be understood. The breadth of the poet’s reading and his intimate relationship with architecture, music and painting inform his work and populate it with unexpected interlocutors: Chopin, Buxtehude, Fragonard, Breughel – or a London barman, or a woman pharmacist in Istanbul.

Thu, Aug 30: First Congregational Church, 2596 Route 113, Thetford, 7:30 p.m. Bloodroot Literary Magazine readings. Info, 785-2915.

Thu, Sep 20: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m.

Kwarne Dawes. Dawes has published fifteen collections of poetry. His most recent titles include Back of Mount Peace (2009); Hope’s Hospice (2009); Wisteria, finalist for the Patterson Memorial Prize; Impossible Flying (2007); and Gomer’s Song (2007). Progeny of Air (Peepal Tree, 1994) was the winner of the Forward Poetry Prize for Best First Collection in the UK. Other poetry collections include Resisting the Anomie (Goose Lane, 1995); Prophets (Peepal Tree, 1995); Jacko Jacobus, (Peepal Tree, 1996); and Requiem, (Peepal Tree. 1996), a suite of poems inspired by the illustrations of African American artist, Tom Feelings in his landmark book The Middle Passage: White Ships/Black Cargo; and Shook Foil (Peepal Tree, 1998), a collection of reggae-inspired poems. His book, Midland, was awarded the Hollis Summers Poetry Prize by the Ohio University Press (2001). In 2001, Dawes was a winner of a Pushcart Prize for the best American poetry of 2001 for his long poem, “Inheritance.”

Fri, Sep 21: Burlington Book Festival, Burlington, 7:00 p.m. Vermont State Poet Laureate Sydney Lea reading.

Wed, Sep 26: Moore Free Library, 23 West Street, Newfane, 7:00 p.m. Vermont State Poet Laureate Sydney Lea reading.

Thu, Oct, 4: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Robert Wrigley. Robert Wrigley has published six collections of poetry including his latest, Earthly Meditations. He has published widely in anthologies and journals, including the Georgia Review, Shenandoah, Poetry, The American Poetry Review, and The Partisan Review. Among his many awards are a Guggenheim, two Pushcart Prizes, and two NEA Fellowships. He is Professor of English and Poet-in-Residence at Lewis and Clark State College. He lives in Idaho.

Thu, Oct 18: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Claudia Rankine. Rankine co-edited the anthology American Women Poets in the 21st Century: Where Lyric Meets Language, and her work is included in several anthologies, including Great American Prose Poems: From Poe to the Present, Best American Poetry 2001, Giant Step: African American Writing at the Crossroads of the Century, and The Garden Thrives: Twentieth Century African-American Poetry. Her work has been published in numerous journals including Boston Review, TriQuarterly, and The Poetry Project Newsletter. She lives and teaches in California.

Thu, Nov 1: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Edward Hirsch. Edward Hirsch was born in Chicago in 1950 and educated both at Grinnell College and the University of Pennsylvania, where he received a Ph.D. in folklore.

His first collection of poems, For the Sleepwalkers, was published in 1981 and went on to receive the Lavan Younger Poets Award from the Academy of American Poets and the Delmore Schwartz Memorial Award from New York University. His second collection, Wild Gratitude (1986), received the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Since then, he has published several books of poems, most recently Special Orders (Alfred A. Knopf, 2008); Lay Back the Darkness (2003); On Love (1998); Earthly Measures (1994); and The Night Parade (1989).

He is also the author of the prose volumes The Demon and the Angel: Searching for the Source of Artistic Inspiration (Harcourt, 2002), Responsive Reading (1999), and the national bestseller How to Read a Poem and Fall in Love with Poetry (1999), which the poet Garrett Hongo called “the product of a lifetime of passionate reflection” and “a wonderful book for laureate and layman both.” Most recently, he published Poet’s Choice (Harcourt, 2007), which collects two years’ worth of his weekly essay-letters running in the Washington Post Book World.

Fri, Nov 9: Next Stage Theater, 15 Kimball Hill, Putney, 7:00 p.m. Vermont State Poet Laureate Sydney Lea reading with Victoria Redel. Info, 387-8500.

Mon, Nov 19: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Alice Noltey.

Alice Notley is the author of more than twenty books of poetry including The Descent of Alette and Mysteries of Small Houses. She was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and winner of the L.A. Times Book Award for Poetry. In 2001, she received an award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the Poetry Society of America’s Shelly Memorial Award. Born in Arizona, Notley grew up in California. She was an important force in the eclectic second generation of the New York school of poetry.

Thu, Dec 13: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Simon Ortiz. On May 27, 1941, Simon J. Ortiz was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He attended Fort Lewis College and the University of New Mexico for undergraduate studies. He received his MFA as an International Writing Fellow at the University of Iowa’s Writer’s School in 1969.

His books of poetry include: Telling and Showing Her: The Earth, The Land (Just Buffalo Literary Center, 1995); After and Before the Lightning (1994); Woven Stone (1992); From Sand Creek: Rising In This Heart Which Is Our America (1981), for which he received a Pushcart Prize; A Good Journey (1977); Going for the Rain (1976); and Naked in the Wind (1971).

He has also published children’s books, memoirs, non-fiction, and short stories, and served as editor of various books and anthologies.

Ortiz is a recipient of the Lila Wallace Reader’s Digest Writer’s Award, the New Mexico Humanities Council Humanitarian Award, the National Endowment for the Arts Discovery Award, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, and was an Honored Poet at the 1981 White House Salute to Poetry. He received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Returning the Gift Festival of Native Writers.

Ortiz lives in the Acoma Pueblo, New Mexico, where he was lieutenant governor and a consulting editor of the Pueblo of Acoma Press. He has taught writing and Native American literature at various institutions, and currently teaches at the University of Toronto.

2013

Thu, Feb, 7: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. Major Jackson.

“Jackson knows the truth of black magic. It is a magic as simple as the belief in humanity that subverts racism, or the esoteric and mystical magic of making jazz, the music of hope and love.” —Aafa Weaver

Major Jackson is the author of two collections of poetry, Hoops (Norton: 2006), a finalist for an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literature-Poetry. and Leaving Saturn (University of Georgia: 2002), winner of the 2000 Cave Canem Poetry Prize and finalist for a National Book Critics Circle Award.

Poems by Major Jackson have appeared in the American Poetry Review, Boulevard, Callaloo, Post Road, Triquarterly, The New Yorker, among other literary journals and anthologies. He is a recipient of a Whiting Writers’ Award and has been honored by the Pew Fellowship in the Arts and the Witter Bynner Foundation in conjunction with the Library of Congress. He has received critical attention in The Boston Globe, Christian Science Monitor, Parnassus, Philadelphia Inquirer, and on National Public Radio’s All Things Considered.

Jackson is an Associate Professor of English at University of Vermont and a faculty member of the Bennington Writing Seminars. In 2006-2007, he was a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University.

Thu, Feb, 21: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m. B.

Fritz Goldberg. Beckian Fritz Goldberg holds an MFA from Vermont College and is the author of several volumes of poetry, Body Betrayer(1991), In the Badlands of Desire (1993), Never Be the Horse(1999), winner of the University of Akron Poetry Prize selected by Thomas Lux, and Twentieth Century Children/, a limited edition chapbook, (1999). Her work has appeared widely in anthologies and journals including The American Poetry Review, The Best American Poetry 1995, Field, The Gettysburg Review, Indiana Review, The Iowa Review, New American Poets of the 90’s, and The Massachusetts Review. She has been awarded the Theodore Roethke Poetry Prize, The Gettysburg Review Annual Poetry Award, The University of Akron Press Poetry Prize, and a Pushcart Prize. Her newest volume of poems, The Book of Accident, will appear in fall, 2002, from Invisible Cities Press. Currently, Goldberg directs the MFA Creative Writing Program at Arizona State University.

Fri, Mar 8: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m.

Sebastian Mathews. Sebastian Matthews is the author of the poetry collection We Generous (Red Hen Press) and a memoir, In My Father’s Footsteps (W. W. Norton). He co-edited, with Stanley Plumly, Search Party: Collected Poem s of William Matthews. Matthews teaches at Warren Wilson College and serves on the faculty at Queens College Low-Residency MFA in Creative Writing. His poetry and prose has appeared in Atlantic Monthly, Georgia Review, New England, Review, Poetry Daily, Poets & Writers, Seneca Review, The Sun, Tin House, Virginia Quarterly Review and The Writer’s Almanac, among others. Matthews co-edits Rivendell, a place-based literary journal, and serves as poetry consultant for Ecotone:
Re-Imagining Place.

  • Again, if you become aware of an event that isn’t posted above, please let me know. My apologies if I have left off anything of importance to any of you, but it can always be corrected in the next Vermont Poetry Newsletter.

Yours in ink,
Ron Lewis

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