Vermont Poetry Newsletter • September 20 2011

[The Vermont Poetry Newsletter is not issued by me but by Ron Lewis, by whose permission I post this. PLEASE NOTE: I have edited his newsletter so that links are provided rather than text. If I cannot find a link, I will either omit the relevant portion of the newsletter to avoid copyright violations, or I will provide an alternate link. Please contact Ron Lewis if you would like to receive his Newsletter in full. All images are linked.]

Vermont Poetry Newsletter

Your Poetry & Spoken Word Gateway
In The Green Mountain State

September 20, 2011 (Previous issue: 07/20) –

In This Issue:

  1. About VPN
  2. Newsletter Editor/Publisher’s Note
  3. Writing Assignments/Suggestions/Exercises/Prompts
  4. Tracy K. Smith – Life on Mars
  5. Philip Levine
  6. Philip Levine Reading “Two Voices”
  7. Chamber Music & Slam!
  8. Young Writers Project’s 1st Slam of the School Year
  9. Vermont’s Literary Magazines
  10. Sydney Lea’s Official Appointment Ceremony
  11. Get to Know Your New State Poet Laureate: Sydney Lea
  12. Release Party for The Salon, Issue #4
  13. Write Action, Greater Brattleboro Area
  14. The Best of Write Action No. 2: Tenth Anniversary Anthology
  15. New USPS Stamps to Honor 10 Poets
  16. Global Poetics Tour
  17. About AWP: The Growth of Creative Writing Programs
  18. Yaddo: A Writer’s Retreat in NY
  19. Galway Kinnell’s Web Site
  20. Profile: Jon Turner
  21. The Warrior Writers Project
  22. Book Review: Double Shadow, by Carl Phillips
  23. Words Hurt The World, Poet Says
  24. Poet Wing Tek Lum and the Virtues of Unpleasantness
  25. Poetry Carved Into Yorkshire Moors
  26. National Book Critics Circle Award Winners
  27. Burlington Book Festival
  28. Brattleboro Literary Festival
  29. Become Your Own Yawn: Dial-a-Poem Poets
  30. Great Poetry Links: 100 Thousand Poets for Change
  31. Poetry Quote – Leonard Cohen
  32. Linebreak Poem
  33. American Life in Poetry Poem
  34. US Poets Laureate List
  35. Vermont Poet Laureates – Updated!
  36. US Poet Laureates From Vermont
  37. New Hampshire Poet Laureates
  38. US Poet Laureates From New Hampshire
  39. Contact Info for Editor/Publisher of VPN: Ron Lewis
  40. Vermont Literary Journals
  41. Vermont Literary Groups’ Anthologies
  42. Vermont Poetry Blogs
  43. State Poetry Society (PSOV)
  44. Year-Round Poetry Workshops in Vermont
  45. Other Poetry Workshops in Vermont
  46. Year-Round Poetry Writing Centers in Vermont
  47. Other Writing Groups in Vermont
  48. Poetry Event Calendar

1.) About the Vermont Poetry Newsletter Network

The Vermont Poetry Newsletter Network is made up of people of all backgrounds, ages and skills who appreciate the craft of poetry and want to promote it in the beautiful state of Vermont. The network consists of a free e-mail list, an eventual web site, workshops, open mics, poetry performances and other literary events.  The network provides opportunities to meet local poets, talk about and enjoy poetry, and motivate and inspire yourself in whatever writing projects you are involved.

The mission of the Vermont Poetry Newsletter is to foster the poetry arts community in the Green Mountain State, home to more writers and poets per capita than any other state in the nation.  Its goals are to serve as a resource for and about VT poets; to support the development of individual poets; and to encourage an audience for poetry in Vermont.

Dating from 2009, the Vermont Poetry Newsletters are being archived on a blog maintained by poet Patrick Gillespie at PoemShape.

2.) Dear Friends of Poetry:

I felt a great honor in being on the Nominating Committee/Poet Laureate Advisory/Selection Panel that combed through 22 poets that were originally nominated by the public.  There were so many poets deserving of our attention, but unfortunately there could only be one left, standing high among his peers.

Let the Vermont Poetry Newsletter be the first place you’ve learned of this: the next Vermont Poet Laureate has been selected, and he has accepted the position, and that person is . . . Sydney Lea.

So, the Vermont Arts Council is pleased to announce that Governor Peter Shumlin has appointed Sydney Lea of Newbury, VT as Vermont’s next Poet Laureate to succeed Ruth Stone, whose four-year term ends in 2011.   A public ceremony honoring Mr. Lea will be held on November 4 at the Capital Plaza Hotel in Montpelier. The ceremony will be attended by Governor Shumlin as part of an evening celebrating the arts in Vermont.

Congratulations, Sydney Lea!

Ron Lewis
VPN Editor/Publisher
(802) 247-5913
vtpoet@gmail.com

3.) WRITING ASSIGNMENT • SUGGESTION EXERCISES

CURRENT
  • Read these quotes from a recent conference of poets.  Find one that makes you want to write a poem.  Write it.

Ron Padgett: The best poems make me dance in my head.

Robert Pinsky:  Contemporary poetry is informed largely by translations from non-Western sources.

Susan Stewart: When we’re born, we enter the world through a door that won’t allow us to return.  When we die, we leave the world through a door that won’t allow us to return.

Stewart:  We turn to the Light, but it blinds us, and we must turn away.

Ron Padgett: Any line repeated many times is not the same thing.  It goes through transformations.

Louise Glück: All memorable poems are difficult.  But that doesn’t mean you must write a poem that is so harrowing and violently perceptive that people flee from it.

Glück:  Every great poem teaches its readers how to read it.

Carl Phillips:  Poets see things clearly that other people either (a) don’t see clearly, or (b) can see, but more easily turn away from.

Ellen Bryant Voigt:  Poetry presents difficulties of several kinds: Density, Reference, Protean form, Erasure, Derangement of senses, and Tonal complexity.  Easily accessible poetry has no tonal complexity, or no tone at all.

Carl Phillips: Reading a poet’s entire body of work chronologically show a record of a mind surprising itself, and then incorporating those surprises.

Glück:  A poem begins as an urgent, felt need to bring a perception into a form.

James Longenbach:  A good poem teaches the writer how to write it.

Patrick Gillespie: Good poets are remembered for their quotes, great poets for their poetry.

Carl Phillips:  A good poem teaches its readers how to read themselves as people.

Ellen Bryant Voigt:  The difficulty and discipline of Art gets us out of the igloo of the Self.

Gerald Stern:  I’m disorganized today.  It’s good to be disorganized.  It makes you pay attention.

Sharon Olds:  My early work was informed by a counter-phobic boldness.

(Exercise given by David Weinstock, Otter Creek Poets)

PREVIOUS: See Previous Issue

Good Luck!

4.)

Tracy K. Smith
Interview by Tom Ashbrook on OnPoint/NPR
September 6, 2011

Poems of Childhood, Grief and Deep Space NY Times

I won’t blame you for not believing this: The photograph on the cover of Tracy K. Smith’s “Life on Mars” is the same one I see every day on my computer desktop. It’s a dramatic and vivid picture from the Hubble Space Telescope, with colors I imagine J. M. W. Turner would have admired, of the Cone Nebula, a pillar of dust and gas some 2,500 light-years from Earth. Scientists say it’s an incubator for baby stars. I’ve long used the image as an efficient and emphatic corrective for solipsism. I look at it when I find myself fretting about, say, book review deadlines or my spotty gym attendance. You can’t simultaneously contemplate the vastness of the universe and take such problems seriously.

At the outset of her third poetry collection, Smith too turns her eyes to the stars in search of perspective and solace, but for her the stakes are considerably higher and the images closer to home. Smith’s father was a scientist who worked on the Hubble’s development, and in her elegies mourning his death, outer space serves both as a metaphor for the unknowable zone into which her father has vanished and as a way of expressing the hope that his existence hasn’t ceased, merely changed. (….)

5.) Philip Levine ‘stunned’ to be named next U.S. poet laureate

The 83-year-old past winner of a Pulitzer and two National Book Awards talks about his goals for his one-year tenure.

By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times August 12, 2011

Philip Levine, the Pulitzer Prize winner who was named the nation’s next poet laureate Wednesday, has spent much of his career listening and reflecting on the voices of America. In his new job he said he has one main goal.

“I want to bring poetry to people who have no idea how relevant poetry is to their lives,” he said in a telephone interview from his home in Fresno, where he is a professor emeritus at Cal State Fresno while continuing to write poetry.

He also hopes to bring some less known poets into the limelight — although as of Wednesday morning, he said, simply answering phone calls was taking up his time. (….)

6.)

7.)

Chamber Music & Slam!
Yellow Barn, Putney
Tuesday, September 20th 8:00 p.m.

Titled “Intimate Letters” and developed during a 4-day workshop at Yellow Barn, the program is a combination of chamber music and slam poetry. The performers include the Parker Quartet (an alumni quartet), baritone William Sharp and pianist Seth Knopp (Yellow Barn faculty), plus four champion slam poets ages 17-24 from Stockton, CA. Specific works include Kurtag’s “12 Microludes” (with poems interspersed), sections from Lee Hyla’s “Howl” (for reader and string quartet), selected art songs including parts of Mahler’s “Kindertotenlieder”, and Janacek’s “Intimate Letters”, along with original solo and ensemble works by the poets.

Tickets are $20 ($10 for students), and a portion of our proceeds will go to Hurricane Irene relief efforts in Brattleboro. For tickets and more information visit www.yellowbarn.org.

8.) Young Writers Project

First Slam of the School Year for All Ages:

Friday, Sept. 23, 7:00 PM at YWP Headquarters in the Basement of Winooski’s Champlain Mill.

9.)

  • Help support your Vermont Literary Magazines!  Yes, we’re indeed fortunate to have 16 lit mags published in our tiny state!
Subscribe to any of these:

10.) Official Appointment Ceremony

Vermont’s New Poet Laureate Sydney Lea, November 4th, Montpelier

Vermont Poet Laureate Ceremony.  Celebration to officially recognize Sydney Lea as Vermont’s new state Poet Laureate.  This event will be in conjunction with when the Governor Shumlin is giving the Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts.  Venue and time TBA later. Put this date in your PDA if you’re planning on attending this important literary event.

11.) Sydney Lea

  • Get to Know Your New State Poet Laureate!

The Nominating Committee/Poet Laureate Advisory/Selection Panel found Sydney Lea’s poetry to be virtuosic in texture and form, yet likely to be engaging to a diversity of readers and listeners because of the work’s dramatic intensity, narrative momentum, and musicality, and because of this poet’s extraordinarily evocative descriptions of northern New England’s landscapes, animal and plant life, and the seasonal panorama.  Through all of his books, Lea pays particular attention to the stories of generations living alongside one another in north-country villages, including the interactions of “old-timers” and relative newcomers.  He continues the tradition of Vermont poets who are both singular – one of a kind – and broadly accessible.

Sydney Lea lives in Newbury, Vermont, and has been a Vermont resident sine the early 1990’s.  He is the prolific author of a number of collections of poetry, including Young of the Year (Four Way Books, 2011), Ghost Pain (Sarabande Books, 2005), Pursuit of a Wound (University of Illinois Press, 2000), To the Bone: New and Selected Poems (University of Illinois Press, 1996), Prayer for the Little City (Scribner’s, 1989), No Sign (University of Georgia Press, 1987), The Floating Candles (University of Illinois Press, 1982), and Searching the Drowned Man (University of Illinois Press, 1980).

Syd Lea has been described as “a man in the woods with his head full of books, and a man in books with his head full of woods.”  Renowned as a prose writer as well as poet, he has also published a novel and two books of essays that combine the precision of an active naturist and ecologist with the erudition of a multilingual professor of literature.  His stories, poems, essays and criticism have appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New Republic, The New York Times, Sports Illustrated, Gray’s Sporting Journal, and many other periodicals, as well as in more than forth anthologies.  Lea co-founded the literary quarterly New England Review in 1977, oversaw its move to the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference at Middlebury College, and edited this esteemed journal until 1989.  His poetry collections have earned special critical acclaim, with Pursuit of a Wound (2000) named one of three finalists for the Pulitzer Prize for poetry.  His preceding volume, To the Bone: New and Selected Poems, was co-winner of the 1998 Poets’ Prize, one of the nation’s highest honors for a single collection of poems.

Lea has received fellowships from the Rockefeller, Fulbright, and Guggenheim Foundations, and has taught at Dartmouth, Yale, Wesleyan, Vermont and Middlebury Colleges as well as at Franklin College in Switzerland and the National Hungarian University in Budapest.  Lea has also been very active for the past quarter century in land conservation and the promotion of literacy.

Summary of poetry book titles:

1) Searching the Drowned Man
2) The Floating Candles
3) No Sign
4) Prayer for the Little City
5) The Blainville Testament
6) Hunting the Whole Way Home: Essays and Poems
7) To The Bone: New and Selected Poems
8) Pursuit of a Wound
9) Ghost Pain
10) Under Drum Ice
11) Young of the Year
12) I Was Thinking of Beauty (to be published in 2013)

Sydney Lea, from Wikipedia.

HOW A POEM HAPPENS – BRIAN BRODEUR’S PROFILES OF POETS – SYDNEY LEA

12.) Release party for The Salon, Issue #4

Thursday, Sep 22nd
BCA (Burlington Center Arts) Center, Burlington,
7:30 p.m.

  • This will be the first event of the Burlington Book Festival.  Issue #4 features April Ossmann, Chard deNiord, Daniel Lusk, Paige Ackerson-Kiely, and more.

Help support your local literary journals. Congratulations to The Salon & Ben Aleshire!

13.)

Write Action
Greater Brattleboro Area

Write Action is a community-based, grass-roots writer’s organization formed in 1999 “to strengthen a community of writers in Brattleboro and the surrounding area; and to nurture, encourage, and promote the literary arts in the at-large community”.

We exist because of an activist, vibrant base of writers in southeastern Vermont, and because of an engaged community of readers. In this, we feel very fortunate – Vermont is fertile ground for writers!

An important part of “strengthening a community of writers” is Write Action’s email newsletter. Now going out to over 300 people, the newsletter highlights literary events in the tri-state region. There are also updates on writing groups, and writer’s opportunities.  Intrinsic to this effort are the open readings, held in various venues throughout the downtown, that take place several times a year.

A collection of work by local authors, “The Best of Write Action” was published in 2003. With this and other fundraising projects, the organization has been able to seed programs and projects. The first Write Action creative writing award for a Brattleboro Union High School senior was presented in 2004. Write Action will present the $100 award annually as part of senior awards night at BUHS. Other awards and scholarship programs are planned, including a high school journalism award named after Write Action’s first president, noted author, activist, and Reformer columnist Marty Jezer, who passed away in June of 2005.

14.) The Best of Write Action No. 2: Tenth Anniversary Anthology

The year 2010 marks a decade of Write Action’s grass-roots support for local writers and writing.  To celebrate, the non-profit organization presents its second collection of poetry and prose from writers living in Brattleboro and the surrounding towns.

Read what local writers and reviewers have to say about The Tenth Anniversary Anthology:
In Write Action’s anthology, we enter death as a country,  witness the majesty of hawks in winter, and experience the hippies of the 60s under the eyes of the benevolent marijuana gods. At turns sexually brazen, gracefully melodic, and laugh out loud funny, this is an astonishing collection of remarkable range. Quite simply, it’s not to be missed.
- Suzanne Kingsbury, author of The Summer Fletcher Greel Loved Me, Scribner

There is humor and hubris, sadness and celebration, strength and weakness, blood, sweat, toil and tears. In short, the sum of our lives – all contained in 200 engaging pages…One of the real gems of 2010.
- editor of “Ovation,” the arts and entertainment section of the Brattleboro Reformer

This impressive collection presents old and new voices to the reading public. Through the poetry and prose, it offers a unique window into Vermont’s contemporary writing landscape.
- Phayvanh Luekhamhan, Friends of the Brooks Memorial Library newsletter

Dave Ritchie in his poem “Why Locovore Writers?” conjures an apt metaphor for the local appetite for verbal sustenance: What about ‘fresh’?/That’s how we want our vegetables./ As recently harvested as possible./ I would like that with my neighboring author./Let her revelations start with us! And so they do.
- Chard deNiord, author of Night Mowing, University of Pittsburg Press

15.)

New literary postal stamps coming soon.
This time around it’s pure poetry!

  • If you’re like me, you probably like to collect a few stamps here and there.  I’m always interested in saving stamps that have something to do with my interests at the time, or even childhood curiosities. The United States Postal Service will be issuing a 10-set of Forever stamps in 2012 that honor 10 great poets!  I’m saving my money up now in order to load up on these beauties!

The number of books published each year in America has been steadily increasing, and poetry is more popular than ever. The ten great writers honored on the Twentieth-Century Poets stamp pane, including several who served as United States Poet Laureate, surely deserve part of the credit. The many awards won by this illustrious group — Elizabeth Bishop, Joseph Brodsky, Gwendolyn Brooks, E. E. Cummings, Robert Hayden, Denise Levertov, Sylvia Plath, Theodore Roethke, Wallace Stevens, and William Carlos Williams — include numerous Pulitzer Prizes, National Book Awards, and honorary degrees.

16.) GLOBAL POETICS TOUR

Global Poetics Tour set to blow the lid off the slam poetry scene in Australia.

Global Poetics Tour features three New York City slam poets visiting Australia for the first time. Jive Poetic, Mahogany L Browne and Ken Arkind, associated with New York’s Nuyorican Poets Café, will appear at this year’s Melbourne Writers Festival, Brisbane Writer’s Festival, Overload Poetry Festival. The 21-day tour will have limited Australian appearances in Melbourne, Brisbane and Sydney. Global Poetics Tour will also kick off Australia’s first National Slam Poetry Summit to be held in Canberra.

  • Get Your Metre Running  Start all the clocks, plug in the phones; poetry is not dead, it has merely reinvented itself. Hot on the heels of chefs, models and even home renovators fighting for a title, comes the battle of the bards. Slam poetry, in which contenders are given three minutes to bare their souls in front of an audience and a panel of judges, is a growing art form that involves someone – anyone – standing in front of an open mike and spilling their guts into a bucket of iambic pentameter. It originated in Chicago in the 1980s and is taking off in Britain, parts of Europe, Singapore and Australia.Editor’s Note

17.) AWP: Association of Writers & Writing Programs

About AWP: The Growth of 
Creative Writing Programs

A Brief History of AWP by David Fenza, Executive Director
The mission of The Association of Writers & Writing Programs is to foster literary achievement, to advance the art of writing as essential to a good education, and to serve the makers, teachers, students, and readers of contemporary writing.

More than any other literary organization, AWP has helped North America to develop a literature as diverse as the continent’s peoples. This, of course, is also a boast for the democratic virtues of higher education in North America and the many public universities that comprise AWP. AWP’s members have provided literary education to students and aspiring writers from all backgrounds, economic classes, races, and ethnic origins. (….)

18.) Yaddo

The writer’s retreat in Saratoga Springs, NY

Founded in 1900 by the financier Spencer Trask and his wife Katrina, herself a poet, Yaddo is an artists’ community located on a 400-acre estate in Saratoga Springs, New York. Its mission is to nurture the creative process by providing an opportunity for artists to work without interruption in a supportive environment.

Yaddo offers residencies to professional creative artists from all nations and backgrounds working in one or more of the following media: choreography, film, literature, musical composition, painting, performance art, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and video. Artists may apply individually or as members of collaborative teams of two or three persons. They are selected by panels of other professional artists without regard to financial means. Residencies last from two weeks to two months and include room, board, and studio. (….)

19.)

20.) Profile ~ Jon Turner

  • Fran Stoddard talks with Jon Turner, veteran of the Iraq War and co-founder of the Combat Paper Project and Warrior Writers. The projects help create community, healing and a means of communication for combat veterans.  A Vermont Public Television broadcast. Go to: http://www.vpt.org/show/11000/1026


21.) The WARRIOR WRITERS PROJECT

  • The Warrior Writers Project brings together recent veterans and current service members to be in creative community and utilize art-making processes to express themselves. There is a deep necessity for veterans to create when so much has been shattered and stolen. A profound sense of hope comes from the ability to rebuild and transform. Our workshops and events utilize (but are not limited to) writing, drawing, photography, papermaking and music. We also compile artwork into books, performances and exhibits so civilians can begin to better understand veterans’ experiences. This website presents the powerful art and creative writing from Warrior Writing Project workshops and performances, as well as information on events, art exhibits, performances, workshops, Warrior Writers books, contact information, ways to get involved, and ways to support the project. Go to: http://www.warriorwriters.org/home.html

22.) Book Review:

Double Shadow

by Carl Phillips

Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2011
$23.00 cloth, ISBN 9780374141578

reviewed by Broc Rossell

A former high school Latin teacher, now professor of poetry and African-American Studies at Washington University in St. Louis, Carl Phillips was elected Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets in 2006. The judge of the 2010 Griffin Prize and sitting judge of the Yale Younger Poets Prize, and the author of twelve collections of poetry, including Quiver of Arrows: Selected Poems 1986–2006, he also translated Sophocles’ Philocetes (2003) and penned Coin of the Realm: Essays on the Life and Art of Poetry (2004). Widely anthologized, his poetry has been published in countless literary journals over the past decade, from The New Yorker and the Atlantic Monthly all the way down. His presence in American poetry is so immense that it is no hyperbole to say that Carl Phillips is an institution; when my Canadian fiancée asked what American poetry was like, I gave her Quiver of Arrows. (….)

23.) Words Hurt The World, Poet Says

by ROBERT KRULWICH

Before we argue, let’s agree: When you are trying to say something important, words matter.

They matter a lot. Here, because it’s so deftly done, is a video reminder:

OK, now that you’ve been softened up by an ad agency, Purplefeather, in Britain, we’re ready for the counter-punch.

Here’s a question. It began an argument between two poets, so it’s about words, about whether using words helps our planet or hurts. (….)

24.) One Should Not Sleep Anymore

Poet Wing Tek Lum and the Virtues of Unpleasantness by Ken Chen

I recently hosted the most unpleasant literary reading I’ve ever attended—a poetic listening experience so wondrously uncomfortable that it led me to think about the purpose of poetry readings and the expectations we have of poetry itself. My literary arts space, The Asian American Writers  Workshop, curated a reading titled DO YOU COPY, which featured three poets from different geopolitical milieus documenting the experience of war. The first two—Filipino American poet Luis Francia and Persian poet Kaveh Bassiri—read work about the Philippine American War, the Iran-Iraq War and September 11th. Some members of the audience were moved by these poems and began crying, but the tears they shed did not express discomfort but aesthetic or moral edification. Although these poems possessed war as their subject matter, they remained more beautiful than war. And then the last reader walked onstage and for thirty unrelenting minutes, read a series of poems describing, among other things, a soldier attempting to wrest his blade loose from a body whose head he is sawing off, a man killing a dog gnawing on a detached human arm, and a woman, who has presumably just been raped, with a live grenade forcibly inserted into one of her orifices. Welcome to the work of Wing Tek Lum, an American Book Award-winning Hawaii-based poet who is slowly, without anyone noticing, building one of the most terrifying oeuvres of contemporary poetry. (….)

25.) Poetry carved into Yorkshire Moors

26.) All Past National Book Critics Circle Award Winners and Finalists

Every year, the National Book Critics Circle presents awards for the finest books published in English. Click here to see the past winners and finalists for all National Book Critics Circle annual awards, from 1975 to present.

27.) Burlington Book Festival

Fri, Sep 23 thru Sun Sep 25

The city’s seventh annual celebration of the written word is on the way. September 23 through 25 enjoy readings, signings, panels, workshops, exhibits, musical performances, demos and special events featuring literary luminaries from around the world-and just around the corner! All events are free and open to the public. This year’s headliners include Elinor Lipman, Ed Koren, Marie Howe, Douglas Kennedy, C. D. Wright, David Macaulay, Spencer Quinn, Myla Goldberg, John Elder Robison, Cynthia Lord and Philip Levine.

The Burlington Book Festival is copresented by Burlington Magazine and The Stern Center for Language and Learning. For a schedule and list of participants or to volunteer, you can call 802-658-3328 or read all about it at burlingtonbookfestival.com. (Poets are bolded.)

28.) Brattleboro Literary Festival

The Brattleboro Literary Festival celebrates its 10th anniversary with over 40 emerging and established authors in readings and special events. Featured authors include fiction authors André Aciman, Julia Alvarez, Richard Bausch, Anthony Doerr (winner- 2011 Story Prize), Téa Obreht (winner – 2011 Orange Prize) and Luis Alberto Urrea; poets Stephen Dobyns, Mark Doty (winner -2008 National Book Award) Monica Youn and Kevin Young, Caldecott Award-winner and Norwich, VT resident David Macaulay; and NPR personalities Tom Bodett and Roy Blount, Jr. Free and open to the public. Info, www.brattleboroliteraryfestival.org.

  •  Check out the lineup!  All I can say is WOW! Please visit their awesome web site!  I’m finding time to go to this event even if I have to crawl there! — Ron

29.) “Become Your Own Yawn”

Information and the Dial-a-Poem Poetsÿ by KATIE GEHA

In a 1970 Arts Magazine article, art critic Gregory Battcock said: “The new curator is more concerned with communication than with art.”

In a 1958 essay on Jackson Pollock, Happenings artist Allan Kaprow said: “They will discover out of ordinary things the meaning of ordinariness.”

In a 1981 interview, poet John Giorno said: “I certainly won’t curl up in a chair with a book of poetry.”

Dial-a-Poem, Giorno’s New York City–wide poetry installation instigated in 1968, used the technology of the telephone, a plastic handheld thing, to relay poetry as if it were simple information. The messages were poems recorded by poets and artists, from John Ashbery to Bobby Seale. For a period of about four years, anyone could dial 212.628.0400 on a rotary telephone and hear a poem. (….)

30.)

100 THOUSAND POETS FOR CHANGE IS ORGANIZING A GLOBAL EVENT FOR SEPTEMBER 24th 2011

600 Events – 450 Cities – 95 Countries

Join other poets around the USA and across the planet, on September 24th, in a demonstration/celebration of poetry to promote serious social, environmental, and political change.

TO REGISTER YOUR EVENT for 100 TPC write to us at: walterblue@bigbridge.org

World s largest  poetry reading slated for 9/24

Michael Rothenberg and Terri Carrion say they believe poets can make a difference–so the pair has taken on the task of instrumenting perhaps the largest global poetry reading ever on September 24.  Their idea is pretty simple. Change starts with each of us in our collective cities and countries uniting under an idea. In this case, the goal is to make poets and poetry impossible to ignore, even if only for a day. (….)

  • 2 events happening in Vermont:

White River Junction. Contact Cynthia Huntington
Newport Click hereMichael Rothenberg & Terri Carrion, Organizers

31.)

“Poetry is just the evidence of life.  If your life is burning well, poetry is just the ash.”

Poetry Quote by Leonard Cohen

32.) linebreak

  • Linebreak is an online journal with a bias for good poetry. Here is a poem from their web site this week:

Police Report

BY HANNAH CRAIG

All those who can have turned their windows dark.
Nobody wants to look into the sleepless gaze
of the house where things ran out. I mean to say,
the things that carried him. Or so they said,
who witnessed all that noise, a tea-colored moon
in its biggest, roundest form, a pregnant belly,
and the valley fog gone wandering up the road.

33.)

American Life in Poetry: Column 337
BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE, 2004-2006

South Dakota poet Leo Dangel has written some of the best and truest poems about rural life that I’m aware of. Here’s a fine one about a chance discovery.

Behind the Plow

I look in the turned sod
for an iron bolt that fell
from the plow frame
and find instead an arrowhead (….)

34.) Poets Laureate of the U.S.A.

A Net-annotated list of all the poets who have served the Library of Congress as Consultant (the old title) or Poet Laureate Consultant (the new title). Biographies & general reference sites are linked to the poets’ names — for the recent Laureates these are our own poet profiles with book-buying links at the bottom. Many of the other linked biographies are pages from the Academy of American Poets’ Find a Poet archive, a growing & invaluable resource. If there is no general information site about the poet, we have searched the Net for sample poems or other writings or recordings & listed those below the poet’s name.

Joseph Auslander 1937-41
Allen Tate 1943-44
Robert Penn Warren 1944-45
Louise Bogan 1945-46
Karl Shapiro 1946-47
Robert Lowell 1947-48
Leonie Adams 1948-49
Elizabeth Bishop 1949-50
Conrad Aiken 1950-52 (First to serve two terms)
William Carlos WilliamsAppointed to serve two terms in 1952 but did not serve — for more on this & other Laureate controversies see the history in Jacket magazine.
Randall Jarrell 1957-58
Robert Frost 1958-59
Richard Eberhart 1959-61
Louis Untermeyer 1961-63
Howard Nemerov 1963-64
Reed Whittemore 1964-65
Stephen Spender 1965-66
James Dickey 1966-68
William Jay Smith 1968-70
William Stafford 1970-71
Josephine Jacobsen 1971-73
Daniel Hoffman 1973-74
Stanley Kunitz 1974-76
Robert Hayden 1976-78
William Meredith 1978-80
Maxine Kumin 1981-82
Anthony Hecht 1982-84
Robert Fitzgerald 1984-85 Appointed and served in a health-limited capacity, but did not come to the Library of Congress
Reed Whittemore 1984-85 Interim Consultant in Poetry
Gwendolyn Brooks 1985-86
Robert Penn Warren 1986-87 First to be designated Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry
Richard Wilbur 1987-88
Howard Nemerov 1988-90
Mark Strand 1990-91
Joseph Brodsky 1991-92
Mona Van Duyn 1992-93
Rita Dove 1993-95
Robert Hass 1995-97
Robert Pinsky 1997-2000
Stanley Kunitz 2000-2001
Billy Collins 2001-2003
Louise Glück 2003-2004
Ted Kooser 2004-2006
Donald Hall 2006-2007
Charles Simic 2007-2008
Kay Ryan 2008-2010
M.S. Merwin 2010-Present

35.)

Historical List of Vermont Poets Laureate

November 4, 2011-Present: Sydney Lea, Newbury (b. December 22, 1942)
July 26, 2007-November 3, 2011:
Ruth Stone, Goshen (b. June 8, 1915)
March 5, 2003 – July 25, 2007: Grace Paley, Thetford (b. December 11, 1922, d. August 22, 2007 of breast cancer)
1999-2002: Ellen Bryant Voigt, Cabot (b. May 9, 1943)
1994-1998: Louise Glück, Cambridge, MA (b. April 22, 1943)
1989-1993: Galway Kinnell, Sheffield (b. February 1, 1927)
July 22, 1961-1963: Robert Frost, Ripton (b. March 26, 1874, d. January 29, 1963 of pulmonary embolism)

Position History:
 According to a February 7, 2003 press release from the Vermont Arts Council, “Robert Frost was declared Poet Laureate in 1961 [upon the adoption of Joint House Resolution 54 by the General Assembly]. In 1988 Governor Kunin re-established the position. (Reference: Executive Order No 69, 1988) Galway Kinnell was the first State Poet named for a term of 4 years as a result of this order in 1989.” The Arts Council further notes that “at the direction of the Governor [it] conducts the selection process for the State Poet by convening an advisory/selection panel. The Vermont State Poet is a person whose primary residence is in Vermont; whose poetry manifests a high degree of excellence; who has produced a critically acclaimed body of work; and who has a long association with Vermont.”

36.)

Historical list of United States Poets Laureate from Vermont

1958-1959: Robert Frost, Ripton (b. March 26, 1874, d. January 29, 1963 of pulmonary embolism)
August, 2003-2004: Louise Glück, Cambridge, MA (b. April 22, 1943)

37.)

Historical List of New Hampshire Poets Laureate

March 2004 – Present: Charles E. Butts
January 2006 – March 2009: Patricia Fargnoli
March 2004 – December 2005: Cynthia Huntington
October, 1999 – March 2004: Marie Harris, Barrington
December 1995 – March 1999: Donald Hall, Wilmot
January 1995 – March 1999: Jane Kenyon, Wilmot
March 1989 – March 1994: Maxine Kumin, Warner
June, 1984 – January 1989: Donald Hall, Danbury
January 1979 – January 1984: Richard G. Eberhart, Hanover
August 1972 – December 1978: Eleanor Vinton, Concord
September 1968 – July 1972: Paul Scott Mowrer

38.)

Historical list of United States Poets Laureate from New Hampshire

2007-2008: Charles Simic, Strafford
2006-2007: Donald Hall, Wilmot
1981-1982: Maxine Kumin, Warner
1959-1961: Richard Eberhart
1958-1959: Robert Frost, Derry

39.) If you ever have a need to contact me, here’s how to go about doing so:

Ronald Lewis:
Phone: 802-247-5913
Cell: 802-779-5913
Home: 1211 Forest Dale Road, Brandon, VT 05733
Email: vtpoet@gmail.com

40.) VERMONT LITERARY JOURNALS

1) The Queen City Review

The QCR is also on FacebookBurlington College’s The Queen City Review is a yearly journal of art and literature and accepts the work of new and established writers and artists in the areas of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, memoir, photography, and fine art, as well as essays and criticism on all aspects of the aforementioned. They seek to publish high quality work that ranges 3) broadly in topic and genre.

The Queen City Review can be purchased by 2-year subscription or individually. The price of one issue is $8 plus shipping charges ($1) for a total of $9. Subscriptions can be purchased for $14 plus shipping charges ($2) and includes the Fall 2010 and upcoming 2011 issues. Copies can also be purchased in the Writing Center or at the front desk. They accept cash, check, and credit cards (Visa and Mastercard). You can mail your payment to them or by calling (802) 862-9616 ext. 234 to place your order over the phone. If mailing your payment, mail details to:

ATTN: Heidi Berkowitz Sadler
Faculty, Interdisciplinary Studies
Coordinator, The Writing Center
Editor, The Queen City Review
Burlington College
95 North Avenue
Burlington, VT 05401

If you have any further questions, you can contact Heidi at:
T: 802-862-9616
E: hsadler@burlington.edu

2) Bloodroot

Bloodroot is a nonprofit literary magazine dedicated to publishing diverse voices through the adventure of poetry, short fiction, and creative nonfiction. Their aim is to provide a platform for the free-spirited emerging and established writer.

The price of a single issue is $8.

Editor, “Do” Roberts
Bloodroot Literary Magazine
PO Box 322
Thetford Center, VT 05075
(802) 785-4916
email: bloodroot@wildblue.net

3) New England Review

A publication of Middlebury College, a high quality literary magazine that continues to uphold its reputation for publishing extraordinary, enduring work. NER has been publishing now for over 30 years.

Cost: $10 for a single current issue
$30 for a single year (4 issues)
$50 for two years (8 issues)

New England Review
Attn: Orders
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753

Email: NEReview@middlebury.edu
(800) 450-9571

4) Willard & Maple

A Literary and Fine Art Magazine of Champlain College, Burlington.

Willard & Maple
163 South Willard Street
Freeman 302, Box 34
Burlington, VT 05401

email: willardandmaple@champlain.edu

5) Vermont Literary Review

A Literary and Fine Art Magazine of Castleton State College, Castleton.

The first issue of Vermont Literary Review was published in 1994. The review is published once a year. Work featured in the review includes poetry, fiction, drama, and personal essays from and about New England.

From its inception until 2006, students and professors reviewed the work submitted and selected work to be published. They used to jointly edit and design the review as well. After a brief lapse, the Vermont Literary Review has resumed publication in 2008 as a journal edited and designed solely by English Department faculty. The Literary Club, which used to help create this journal, is now putting out a publication of student work. (….)

6) Green Mountains Review


A Literary and Fine Art Magazine of Johnson State College, Johnson; in publication since 1987. One of two literary journals published by the college, the other being The Gihon River Review (below).

The Green Mountains Review is an international journal publishing poems, stories, and creative nonfiction by both well-known authors and promising newcomers. The magazine also features interviews, literary criticism, and book reviews. Neil Shepard is the general editor and poetry editor of the Green Mountains Review. The fiction editor is Leslie Daniels.

The editors are open to a wide range of styles and subject matter. If you would like to acquaint yourself with some of the work that we have accepted in the past, then we encourage you to order some of our back issues (….)

7) The Gihon River Review

“The name of the second river is Gihon. No sooner has it come out of Paradise than it vanishes beneath the depths of the sea . . .” -Moses Bar Cepha

The Gihon River Review, published biannually, was founded in the fall of 2001 as a production of the BFA program at Johnson State College. Issues are $5 each. Submissions in poetry, fiction, and nonfiction are read from September to May. Poetry submissions may not exceed five poems; fiction and nonfiction may not exceed twenty-five pages. Send all correspondence to The Gihon River Review, Johnson State College, Johnson, Vermont 05656. Please enclose a SASE. For further info by email, grr@jsc.vsc.edu.

8) Burlington Poetry Journal

The Burlington Poetry Journal is a new nonprofit publication interested in creating a means for provoking opinions, ideas, and thoughtful responses for poets in the Greater Burlington area. The Burlington Poetry Journal is an independent publication that is dedicated to the concept that art should be free and accessible to everyone. In a world with so many voices we believe in a community based, eclectic approach to the publication of poetry. Therefore, the BPJ will always welcome any form or style within its pages.

While there are numerous outlets for writers to gather and share privately in Vermont, there is no publication that brings together poetry of all styles and writers of all ages for the enjoyment of the general public. It is our hope that this journal will inspire writers to share their work with others who may be unaware of their talent, and for those who have never considered themselves writers to try their hand at poetry. We invite you to submit your work and share with others your thoughts and abilities with the Burlington community. The work you share will produce a dialogue as writers become aware of each other and begin to expose themselves and others to new poetry. The eclectic nature of the Burlington Poetry Journal will serve to stimulate its readers and authors. They are currently working towards achieving a non-profit 501(c)3 status.

9) Tarpaulin Sky

Founded in 2002 as an online literary journal, Tarpaulin Sky took the form of 12.5 internet issues (see the archive) before its first paper edition in November 2007, and the magazine continues to publish new work both online and in print. In addition to these issues, Tarpaulin Sky publishes work by individual authors in its “chronic content” section, as well as online-only book reviews

Tarpaulin Sky focuses on cross-genre / trans-genre / hybrid forms as well as innovative poetry and prose. The journal is not allied with any one style or school or network of writers; rather, we try to avoid some of the defects associated with dipping too often into the same literary gene pool, and the diversity of our contributors is evidence of our eclectic interests (….)

10) The Mountain Review

Colchester High School’s English Department has been publishing an interesting literary magazine: The Mountain Review. The Mountain Review is sponsored by the Vermont Council of Teachers of English Language Arts (VCTELA). Generally, the mission is to publish work from Vermont students, K-12. The Mountain Review has published poems, essays, short stories, excerpts from larger works, and art work. Wayland Cole and Katie Lenox have been the editors for several years; both teach at Colchester. Before them, Shelia Mable, a South Burlington teacher, was the editor for many years.

2009’s Mountain Review is over 100 pages long!

Students at all Vermont schools can enter the competition to be published in the Mountain Review. If you have questions, feel free to call them at (802) 264-5700 or email at colew@csdvt.org or lenoxk@csdvt.org. Send orders for copies of The Mountain Review to Katie Lenox at: Colchester High School, PO Box 900, Colchester, VT 05446. Send $5 per book; $2 postage to ship 1-3 books. Checks payable to the VCTELA.

11) The Salon: A Journal of Poetry & Fiction

The Honeybee Press is a brand-new writer’s cooperative based in Burlington, Vermont. The first book from the press is its bi-annual literary magazine, The Salon: A Journal of Poetry & Fiction. The goal of the press is to produce high-quality local literature and make it more affordable and visible to the public. To submit to The Salon, see the guidelines listed on its web address.

  • Click on link for submission guidelines.

12) Hunger Mountain

Hunger Mountain is both a print and online journal of the arts. We publish fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, visual art, young adult and children’s writing, writing for stage and screen, interviews, reviews, and craft essays. Our print issue comes out annually in the fall, and our online content changes on a regular basis. (….)

Hunger Mountain Subscriptions

Vermont College of Fine Arts
36 College Street
Montpelier, VT 05602

Subscription Prices
One Year $12.00
Two Year $22.00
Four Year $40.00 (Save $8!)
Back issues $8.00

13) The Onion River Review

The Onion River Review is a literary journal whose annual edition features poetry, prose, and visual arts. The Onion River Review is edited by the students of Saint Michael’s College in Vermont, and is committed to publishing work from students, faculty, staff, alumni, and the greater community.

The Onion River ReviewWilliam Marquess, Advisor
One Winooski Park #171
Colchester, VT 05439

14) Route Seven – The St. Albans Literary Guild Magazine

The first issue of the Saint Albans Literary Guild’s magazine, Route Seven: A Vermont Literary Journal, is a 56-page publication featuring new and established writers and artists with an emphasis on Northwestern Vermont writers. Strong literary and non-fiction voices from other regions are also featured and are encouraged to submit to future issues.

ST. ALBANS: The Saint Albans Literary Guild is proud to announce the release of the premiere issue of Route 7, a new Vermont literary journal, on Sat., Feb. 20, at the STAART Gallery in St. Albans. The event will feature readings from contributing authors, as well as hors d’oeuvres and beverages.
Route 7 is a 56-page magazine featuring fiction, non-fiction, humor, poetry, and artwork. The first issue includes a wide range of moods, from the introspective and idyllic to the offbeat and humorous. The more than 20 contributors included hail from Franklin County, and across Vermont and New Hampshire. The magazine aims to highlight creative voices from across the region. (….)

15) Vantage Point

Vantage Point is the arts and literary journal at the University of Vermont. VP is a student-run journal, supported by generous funding from the Student Government Association at UVM, which allows them to circulate the journal to students and the general public for free. They also receive funding from the Mary Brigham Buckham Fund, through UVM’s English Department.

Vantage Point was established in 2002 by a group of students in the Honors College who felt that UVM needed a literary journal. In the past, they have published strictly student work, however this past semester they opened up the submission pool to faculty and to the general public. They are continuing to go that route this semester as well.

16) est

est is a publication of literary and visual art.

It serves as an outlet for creative people to share their work freely with others.

With technology affirming its ever-present role in media and communication, it can be difficult to find an alternative that is as accessible and timely. Contrary to the endless supply of self proclaimed material from bloggers and youtubers, est works to sustain the precious art form of a handmade publication. All issues are of a limited edition and offer a unique perspective on the fears, humor and sensitivities of our world. Peer revision and interactive projects at the release events also help introduce and network contributors with each other. Past issues of est feature poetry, short fiction, drawing, photography, comics, DIY instructions and interactive projects. Each edition of 100 zines are hand numbered and bound by a pamphlet stitch.

Hard copies are available at select retailers as well as online via mail order. 
Subscriptions are also available.

est is available for viewing and purchase at these locations:

Speaking Volumes – Burlington, VT
Boutilier’s – Burlington, VT
Battery Street Jeans – Burlington, VT
Earth Prime Comics – Burlington, VT
Village Wine & Coffee – Shelburne, VT
Brown Dog Books – Hinesburg, VT

Direct correspondence to Heather Bischoff, Solicitor/Editor, at estpress@gmail.com

41.)

VERMONT LITERARY GROUPS’ ANTHOLOGIES

1) Vermont Voices, An Anthology

Published by the League of Vermont Writers periodically. They have just published their 3rd anthology.

  • Vermont Voices I (published in 1991)
  • Vermont Voices II (published in 1995)
  • Vermont Voices III (published in 1999)

2) *See Below

Published by the Otter Creek Poets periodically. They have just published their 3rd volume.

  • By the Waterfall (published in 1999)
  • Maps and Voyages (published in 2004)
  • Line By Line (published in 2006)

No web site to date. All editions and issues out of print and no longer available.

3) League of Vermont Writers

Published by the Mad River Poets periodically. They have just published their 3rd volume.

  • Pebbles from the Stream (published in 2002)
  • Maps and Voyages (published in 2004)
  • Line By Line (published in 2006)

4) The Mountain Troubadour

  • Published by the Poetry Society of Vermont annually.

42.) VERMONT POETRY BLOGS

1) PoemShape

Patrick Gillespie maintains a bright, intelligent blog. There is a decided bias in favoring poetry that is written in meter, that uses form, or that plays with language in ways that separate poetry from prose – rhetoric, imagery, simile, metaphor, conceit, rhyme, meter — Traditional Poetry.

PoemShape is now the home of the Vermont Poetry Newsletter & Poetry Event Calendar.

One can subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new postings by email.

43.)

STATE POETRY SOCIETY

The Poetry Society of Vermont, founded in 1947, is an association of poets and supporters who join in promoting an interest in poetry through meetings, workshops, readings, contests, and contributions to the society’s chapbook. Anyone may join the society including high school and college students and non-residents of Vermont. We welcome both writers and appreciative readers.Membership in PSOV

Benefits:
  • 2 luncheon/ workshops a year where a professional poet critiques your poems
  • one hands- on writing workshop and reading under the direction of a professional poet
  • the opportunity to enter contests judged by professional poets and to win awards
  • fellowship with appreciative readers and writers of poetry
  • opportunity for publication in the PSOV chapbook, The Mountain Troubadour
How to join:
mail dues of $20.00 to Membership Chairman, P.O. Box 1215, Waitsfield, VT 05673
include your name, mailing address, telephone, and e-mail address for Membership List
memberships are renewed by January 1 of each year
The PSOV has 2 current books available for sale:
1) The Mountain Troubadour – 2010 – Curl up with interesting, award-winning poetry from a wonderful group of poets. This book is only $8 (+$1 to mail). To get yourself a copy, call or write to Betty Gaechter, 134 Hitzel Terrace, Rutland, VT 05701, 773-8679. This little booklet may be just the thing to get you involved with the PSOV for a lifetime of friendships.
2) Brighten the Barn – 60th Anniversary Anthology – 1947-2007 – An Anthology of Poems by Members of the Poetry Society of Vermont. 99 pages of quality poetry; that’s a lot of beautiful poetry for only $12. If you get it through me (Ron Lewis), it’s only $12. If you want it shipped to you, the PSOV wants an extra amount to cover tax and shipping ($0.72 + $3.00). This book retails for $15, but a reduced price is now in play to unload the few remaining copies.

44.) YEAR-ROUND POETRY WORKSHOPS IN VERMONT


BELLOWS FALLS

1) Great River Arts Institute – See details elsewhere in this newsletter

2) Poetry Workshop at Village Square Booksellers with Jim Fowler (no relation to owner Pat). The goal of this course is to introduce more people to the art of writing poetry and will include a discussion of modern poetry in various forms and styles. Each week, the course will provide time to share and discuss participant’s poetry. Poetry Workshops on Monday mornings (9:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m.) – Jim Fowler’s sessions continue, with periodic break for a few weeks between sessions. Students should bring a poem and copies to the first class. The course will be limited to 5 to 8 students to allow adequate time to go through everyone’s poetry contributions and will meet in the café at Village Square Booksellers. James Fowler, of Charlestown, New Hampshire, has a Masters Degree in Environmental Science with a major in Nature Writing. He was the editor of Heartbeat of New England, a poetry anthology. Fowler has been widely published since 1998 in such journals as Connecticut Review, Quarterly of Light Verse, and Larcom Review. Fowler is a founding member of the River Voices Writer’s Circle, and a regular reader at Village Square Booksellers-River Voices Poetry Readings. The fee for this 6-week Workshop is $100, payable to Mr. Fowler at the first class. Pre-registration for the Poetry Workshop is suggested and may be made by calling Village Square Booksellers at 802-463-9404 or by email at vsbooks@sover.net or jfowler177@comcast.net.

3) InkBlot Complex Poetry Workshop runs through the Vermont Independent Media’s Media Mentoring Project and is held at the Rockingham Public Library at 65 Westminster Street in Bellows Falls. No previous writing or journalism experience or even class attendance is required. Participants are invited to bring a project or share successful techniques. The workshop aims to lift poetry from the page and reveal how it is a living force in daily life. Originally taught at the University of Illinois at Chicago to great acclaim, its interactive nature and inclusion of multiple art forms leaves dry, academic notions of poetry behind. It functions through three tenets: 1) Presentation of the art form as a living element of our daily world, 2) individualized, personal enrichment and free range of expression for each student, and 3) artistic cultivation through unexpected means. Taught by seasoned arts journalist, cultural critic and poet Clara Rose Thornton, this free event explores the poetry we encounter all around us – in songs we hear, the ways we express ourselves, even the advertisements we see. In the final session students then create their own works with an increased sense of connection to the way words construct meaning. All materials are provided. Instructor Clara Rose Thornton is an internationally published film, wine and visual arts critic, music journalist, poet and former book and magazine editor. Her writings on culture and the arts have appeared nationally in Stop Smiling: The Magazine for High-Minded Lowlifes, Honest Tune: The American Journal of Jam and Time Out Chicago. Currently residing in an artists’ colony in Windham County, she acts as the biweekly arts columnist for the Rutland Herald, staff writer for Southern Vermont Arts & Living and a regular contributor to The Commons. A portfolio, bio and roster of writing and editing services can be found at www.clararosethornton.com. For more information about the Media Mentoring Project, visit www.commonsnews.org or call 246-6397. You can also write to Vermont Independent Media at P.O. Box 1212, Brattleboro, VT 05302.

For more on the InkBlot Complex Poetry Workshop, see description under Other Poetry Workshops in Vermont (Anywhere, VT).

BERLIN

The Wayside Poets, who share their poetry publicly from time to time, have been meeting irregularly for the past 25 years. They used to be called The Academy Street Poets. Membership is by invitation only. They meet now at the Wayside Restaurant & Bakery in Berlin. Members include Diane Swan, Sherry Olson, Carol Henrikson and Sarah Hooker. You can contact them through Sherry Olson at: solsonvt@aol.com or 454-8026.

BURLINGTON

The Cherry Lane Poets are a small group (7-8) of poets that meet on the first Thursday of every month. The membership has been kept to a minimum so that poets will have all the time they need during critiques. Each poet has been or is a member of another poetry critiquing group, so the information passed to each other is more professional than that of most poetry groups. The primary goal of this group is to polish their work, get it submitted, and have it published. Each member brings a new poem with them, with enough copies to pass around, and reads it aloud to the group; it gets critiqued by each member during the following month, and those critiques are presented at the next meeting. Regina Brault is the contact person, (802) 860-1018; membership is by invitation only.

The Burlington Poets Society, a group of “stanza scribblers” that express their love of verse, made up of UVM students and professors, have recently organized, meeting at the Fleming Museum at UVM in Burlington for their periodic “The Painted Word” series of poetry readings.

GUILFORD

The Johnson Writer’s Group, newly formed on January 26, 2011, meets weekly on Wednesday evenings from 7:00 to 9:00, at the Johnson Public Library on Railroad Street, in the front room. This is a free drop-in prompt writing group modeled after the Burlington Writing Group that’s been going strong for many years now. The writers themselves decide on a prompt and write for 20 minutes, followed by a go-around reading. They usually get in two writes depending on the group’s size. All genres and experience levels are welcomed and there really are no rules other than not interrupting folks while they are writing. They don’t really do much critiquing though some spontaneous reactions do occur! This group believes that it’s just good practice to show up and write for 40 minutes and share the writing if so inclined… Feel free to join this group on a perpetual basis or whenever you’re in town. Contact is Cynthia Hennard at (802) 363-5541 or (802) 730-8125.

JOHNSON

The Guilford Poets Guild, formed in 1998, meets twice a month to critique and support each other’s work. Their series of sponsored readings by well-known poets which began at the Dudley Farm, continues now at the Women and Family Life Center.

MIDDLEBURY

1.) The Otter Creek Poets offer a poetry workshop every Thursday afternoon, from 1:00 to 3:00 in the basement meeting room of the Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main Street, Middlebury. This workshop, the largest and oldest of its kind in the state, has been meeting weekly for 13 years. Poets of all ages and styles come for peer feedback, encouragement, and optional weekly assignments to get the poetry flowing. Bring a poem or two to share (plus 20 copies). The workshops are led by David Weinstock. There is considerable parking available behind the library, or further down the hill below that parking lot. For more information, call David at 388-6939 or Ron Lewis at 247-5913.

2) The Spring Street Poets. This group is by invite only and consists of six members, Jennifer Bates, Janet Fancher, Karin Gottshall, Ray Hudson, Mary Pratt and David Weinstock.

MONTPELIER: Vermont College of Fine Arts

Established in 1981, the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing Program was one of the first low-residency programs in the country. The Atlantic named it one of the top five low-residency programs nationwide. At each MFA in Writing residency, a renowned poetry or prose writer joins the program for a substantial portion of the residency. The author gives a reading and/or talk, meets with numerous students individually, and is available in many informal ways throughout the residency to interact with students. The College publishes Hunger Mountain: the VCFA Journal of the Arts and writers may choose to attend a summer residency in Slovenia, in lieu of Vermont.

PANTON

This town is the home of Leonard Gibbs and his Dead Creek Poets Society. Leonard Gibbs is a member of the Otter Creek Poets and Poetry Society of Vermont, is the Magister Ludi of The Dead Creek Poets’ Society. Leonard invites visitors to his web site, Quibbles.com, and subsequent comments for discussion; send him some of your poetry for free critiques! He’s really very good. Leonard’s email address is: ML_Len@Quibbles.org. Interesting responses to items Leonard has posed on his site may end up on the site itself.

Leonard also publishes the Poet’s Corner, a regular monthly column in the Addison Independent. The newspaper has recently informed Len that they would like to have more poetry published in their newspaper, so Len is asking poets from anywhere in Vermont to send him material for him to review for future articles in Poet’s Corner.

NORWICH

This group meets on the first Sunday of every month at the Norwich Library, 6:30 p.m.

SAINT ALBANS

The Saint Albans Literary Guild organizes author readings, classes on writing and literature, and other book related events. The Guild is sponsoring a new literary magazine featuring local writers. Finally, it promotes Vermont authors, book groups, writing groups, and literary events held in Franklin County and northwestern Vermont. Contact us for more information or join the Guild to become involved with literary endeavors in your area.

The first issue of the Saint Albans Literary Guild’s magazine, Route Seven: A Vermont Literary Journal, is a 56-page publication featuring new and established writers and artists with an emphasis on Northwestern Vermont writers. Strong literary and non-fiction voices from other regions are also featured and are encouraged to submit to future issues.

Contact them through their web site or through Jay Fleury, Guild President.

SPRINGFIELD

A Writer’s Group has started to meet at the Springfield Town Library on the fourth Monday of each month, from 7 to 8 pm. For more information, call 885-3108.

STOWE

There is another poetry workshop happening in Stowe, but unfortunately I know nothing much about this group. If you do, contact me!

WAITSFIELD

The Mad River Poets consists of a handful of poets from the Route 100 corridor. More on this group in the future.


45.)

OTHER POETRY WORKSHOPS IN VERMONT

BURLINGTON

Scribes in the making put pen to paper as part of an open verse-writing session at the Fletcher Free Library, 235 College Street. Contact information: 862-1094.

ANYWHERE, VERMONT

Revived for the 2009 academic year is the InkBlot Complex Poetry Workshop, designed for upper-elementary and high-school-age students, grades 7-12. The curriculum functions through three tenets:

  • Innovative presentation of the art form as a living element of our daily world
  • Individualized, personal enrichment and free range of expression for each student
  • Artistic cultivation through unexpected means

The workshop debuted at the University of Illinois at Chicago, during a three-week summer program, entitled Project C.H.A.N.C.E., for underprivileged sophomore and senior students from area high schools. It was a fantastic success, and the program director requested its return. With this encouragement, I decided to expand and adapt the workshop for various age levels, as an educational/arts supplement for after-school programs and enrichment programs and an arts elective for more traditional academic settings. The response has been wonderful. (…) Click on Typewriter for more…

WHITE RIVER JUNCTION

The Writer’s Center
58 Main Street, White River Junction, Vermont

Instructor: April Ossmann (author of Anxious Music, Four Way Books, 2007, writing, editing and publishing consultant, and former Executive Director of Alice James Books)

Info: (802)333-9597 or aprilossmann@hotmail.com and http://www.aprilossmann.com.

46.)

YEAR-ROUND POETRY WRITING CENTERS IN VERMONT

BURLINGTON

The Burlington Writer’s Group (BWG) meets on Tuesday evenings from 7-9 PM and has a new home at the Unitarian Church in the church’s little white house off of Clark St., 2nd floor. They’d like to let people know and also invite anyone interested to join them whenever folks are in town or as often as they’d like.

The Burlington Writer’s Group is a free drop-in group. They decide on a prompt and write for 20 minutes, followed by a go-around reading. They can usually get in two writes depending on group size. All genres and experience levels are welcome and there really are no rules other than demonstrating courtesy while people are writing (don’t interrupt). They don’t do much critiquing though some spontaneous reactions occur. Mainly it’s good practice to just show up and write for 40 minutes and share the writing, if so inclined…

BURLINGTON

Women Writing for (a) Change supports the authentic experience of women who honor themselves through creative writing. Our community supports reflection as we move into our questions and awaken to change. Participants enhance expressive skills, strengthen their voices, deepen themselves as women as writers for positive change in all spheres of life. Creative writing in all genres is our shared vehicle. Women Writing for (a) Change is for women who, 1) dream of writing for self-discovery, for personal or social healing, 2) hunger for creative process in their lives, 3) yearn to explore their feminine voice, 4) crave reflective, space, and 5) are in transition. For more information, go to their web site at www.leagueofvermontwriters.org or contact Sarah Bartlett at either 899-3772 or sarah@womenwritingvt.com.

JOHNSON

Vermont Studio Center

Founded by artists in 1984, the Vermont Studio Center is the largest international artists’ and writers’ Residency Program in the United States, hosting 50 visual artists and writers each month from across the country and around the world.

The Vermont Studio Center offers four-to-twelve-week studio residencies year-round to 600 painters, sculptors, printmakers, photographers, and writers (50 residents per month). VSC’s 30-building campus is set on the banks of the Gihon River in rural Johnson, Vermont, a town of 3,000 located in the heart of the northern Green Mountains. Each Studio Center residency features undistracted working time, the companionship of fifty artists and writers from across the country and around the world, and access to a roster of prominent Visiting Artists and Writers. All residencies include comfortable housing, private studio space, and excellent food. Two Visiting Writers per month are in residence for one week each to offer readings, a craft talk, and optional conferences with each of the 10-14 writers in residence each month.

MONTPELIER

Vermont College of Fine Arts

Established in 1981, the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing Program was one of the first low-residency programs in the country. The Atlantic named it one of the top five low-residency programs nationwide. At each MFA in Writing residency, a renowned poetry or prose writer joins the program for a substantial portion of the residency. The author gives a reading and/or talk, meets with numerous students individually, and is available in many informal ways throughout the residency to interact with students. The College publishes Hunger Mountain: the VCFA Journal of the Arts and writers may choose to attend a summer residency in Slovenia, in lieu of Vermont.

SPRINGFIELD

A Writer’s Group has started to meet at the Springfield Town Library on the fourth Monday of each month, from 7 to 8 pm. For more information, call 885-3108.

WHITE RIVER JUNCTION

The Writer’s Center is for serious writers and nervous beginners. It’s for procrastinators who could benefit from regular deadlines – and for the prolific who could benefit from quality feedback. It’s for anyone with a manuscript hidden in a drawer, or a life story or poem waiting to be written. It’s for people who don’t know where to start or how to end. And for writers who are doing just fine on their own, but would like the company of other writers. The Writer’s Center is for anyone who is writing or wants to write. One of the Center’s consultants is April Ossman. Founded by Joni B. Cole and Sarah Stewart Taylor, the Writer’s Center offers instruction and inspiration through a selection of workshops, discussions, and community. We would love to see you – and your writing – at The Writer’s Center!

  • Prose‭! ‬Poetry‭! ‬Journaling‭! ‬Pitching‭! (‬I know‭! ‬I know‭! ‬F.‭ ‬Scott Fitzgerald said that using exclamation points is like laughing at your own joke‭… ‬but what’s wrong with that‭?!!!)

The Writer’s Center website is at‭ ‬www.thewriterscenterwrj.com

  • The Writer’s Center” has a new Facebook Page that we’re now using to spread the word about workshops, offer writing tips, share publishing news, etc. If you haven’t already, be a part of the page by following the link below and clicking “like”. Write on!


47.)

OTHER WRITING GROUPS IN VERMONT

1.) The League of Vermont Writers.

The League is open to all who make writing a part of their lives. We offer encouragement, motivation, and networking opportunities to writers with a broad range of writing experience.
You do not need to be published to join. Visit their Membership Page for more information about benefits and fees.
Founded in 1929, LVW’s mission is to:

  • Help writers develop their skills
  • Promote responsible and ethical writing and writing practices
  • Increase communication between professional writers and publishers
  • Promote an enduring appreciation for the power of the word

The LVW publishes Vermont Voices, An Anthology, at irregular times. They have published 3 separate volumes to date.

2) Write Action
Greater Brattleboro Area

Write Action is a community-based, grass-roots writer’s organization formed in 1999 “to strengthen a community of writers in Brattleboro and the surrounding area; and to nurture, encourage, and promote the literary arts in the at-large community”.

We exist because of an activist, vibrant base of writers in southeastern Vermont, and because of an engaged community of readers. In this, we feel very fortunate – Vermont is fertile ground for writers!

An important part of “strengthening a community of writers” is Write Action’s email newsletter. Now going out to over 300 people, the newsletter highlights literary events in the tri-state region. There are also updates on writing groups, and writer’s opportunities.  Intrinsic to this effort are the open readings, held in various venues throughout the downtown, that take place several times a year. (….)

Contacting Write Action:

Write Action
P.O. Box 822
Brattleboro, Vt 05302

Or email us at: info@writeaction.org

Write Action Email Newsletter
If you are not now part of our email network, but would like to be, enabling you to receive notices about area readings, writing groups, and other literary opportunities and events, please send your email address to Eric Blomquist at WriteAction2004@aol.com, and you will be added to the subscriber list.

48.) POETRY EVENT CALENDAR

  • Below please find the most current list of poetry happenings in Vermont for the near future.  Please be aware that these events can be found on Poetz.com, but there is usually additional information that is typed here that would be cumbersome to place on Poetz.com.  Please note all events are Vermont-based unless they are of extreme importance or happen to lie just outside our borders.  If you would like to save on paper and ink, please just highlight what you need, or perhaps only events for the coming month, and print that information.  All events are advertised as free unless indicated otherwise.

Tue, Sep 20: Bear Pond Books, 77 Main Street, Montpelier, 7:00 p.m..  David Budbill. David reads from his new book of poems, HAPPY LIFE,  at 7:00 p.m.,  Bear Pond Books, 77 Main Street, Montpelier, VT. For more information contact: Pat Lyon Surrey at: patls@bearpondbooks.com.

Tue, Sep 20:Yellow Barn, Putney, 8:00 p.m..  Titled “Intimate Letters” and developed during a 4-day workshop at Yellow Barn, the program is a combination of chamber music and slam poetry.

The performers include the Parker Quartet (an alumni quartet), baritone William Sharp and pianist Seth Knopp (Yellow Barn faculty), plus four champion slam poets ages 17-24 from Stockton, CA. Specific works include Kurtag’s “12 Microludes” (with poems interspersed), sections from Lee Hyla’s “Howl” (for reader and string quartet), selected art songs including parts of Mahler’s “Kindertotenlieder”, and Janacek’s “Intimate Letters”, along with original solo and ensemble works by the poets.

Tickets are $20 ($10 for students), and a portion of the proceeds will go to Hurricane Irene relief efforts in Brattleboro. For tickets and more information visit www.yellowbarn.org<http://www.yellowbarn.org/>.

Thu, Sep 22: BCA (Burlington Center Arts) Center, Burlington, 7:30 p.m..  Release party for The Salon, Issue #4.  This will be the first event of the Burlington Book Festival. The Salon: A Journal of Poetry & Fiction will team up with the Burlington Book Festival and Burlington City Arts to celebrate the release of its fourth issue at the BCA Center. Issue #4 features new work by some of Vermont’s finest authors, including Paige Ackerson-Kiely, Chard deNiord, April Ossmann, Daniel Lusk and others. $5 admission includes a copy of the latest issue, readings, live music, refreshments and letter-press demonstrations.

Fri, Sep 23: Young Writers Project Headquarters, basement of Winooski’s Champlain Mill, 7:00 p.m.. Young Writers Project First Slam of the School Year.  This event is for all ages.

Fri, Sep 23-Sun, Sep 25: Burlington Book Festival. The city’s seventh annual celebration of the written word is on the way. September 23 through 25 enjoy readings, signings, panels, workshops, exhibits, musical performances, demos and special events featuring literary luminaries from around the world-and just around the corner! All events are free and open to the public. This year’s headliners include Elinor Lipman, Ed Koren, internationally acclaimed poet Marie Howe, Douglas Kennedy, C. D. Wright, David Macaulay, Spencer Quinn, Myla Goldberg, John Elder Robison, Cynthia Lord and current U.S. Poet Laureate Philip Levine.  The Burlington Book Festival is copresented by Burlington Magazine and The Stern Center for Language and Learning. For a schedule and list of participants or to volunteer, you can call 802-658-3328 or read all about it at burlingtonbookfestival.com. (Poets are bolded.)

Fri, Sep 23: Aiken Hall’s Morgan Room, Champlain College, 7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.. Silver Screen Submarine Poetry Jazz Messengers. Over fifty years ago, Gerry Mulligan and Jack Kerouac created improvisational jazz-poetry fusion that swept Greenwich Village and spilled out of New York into the Great Beyond. Three generations later it has found a home at Champlain College, where young hep kittens and cats take to the stage in high voltage synergetic incantation. Led by renowned poet Jim Ellefson.  A Burlington Book Festival event.

Fri, Sep 23: The Film House, Main Street Landing’s Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m..  A Burlington Book Festival event: Internationally Acclaimed Poet Marie Howe.

“Marie Howe’s poetry doesn’t fool around,” said Margaret Atwood about Howe’s first collection, The Good Thief, which received a National Poetry Series award in 1989. “These poems are intensely felt, sparely expressed, and difficult to forget; poems of obsession that transcend their own dark roots.” Stanley Kunitz selected Howe for a Lavan Younger Poets Prize from the American Academy of Poets.

Howe’s second book, What the Living Do, in which “The Gate” appears, is largely an elegy to her brother John, who died of AIDS in 1989. In addition to the feelings of loss that many of her poems reveal, hope and an appreciation of life are also important themes. “Each of them seems a love poem to me,” Howe has said of the poems in this volume. What the Living Do was praised by Publishers Weekly as one of the five best poetry collections of the year.

She co-edited the essay anthology, In the Company of My Solitude: American Writing from the AIDS Pandemic in 1994. Her latest volume of poetry, The Kingdom of Ordinary Time, was published in 2008.

Among her numerous honors, Howe has been a fellow at the Bunting Institute at Radcliffe College in Cambridge, Massachusetts and has received both NEA and Guggenheim fellowships. Her poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Poetry, Agni, Ploughsahres, Harvard Review and The Partisan Review, among others. Currently, Howe teaches creative writing at Sarah Lawrence College, Columbia and New York University.

Sat, Sep 24-Sun, Sep 25 (2nd day): Burlington Book Festival. The city’s seventh annual celebration of the written word is on the way. September 23 through 25 enjoy readings, signings, panels, workshops, exhibits, musical performances, demos and special events featuring literary luminaries from around the world-and just around the corner! All events are free and open to the public. This year’s headliners include Elinor Lipman, Ed Koren, internationally acclaimed poet Marie Howe, Douglas Kennedy, C. D. Wright, David Macaulay, Spencer Quinn, Myla Goldberg, John Elder Robison, Cynthia Lord and current U.S. Poet Laureate Philip Levine.  The Burlington Book Festival is copresented by Burlington Magazine and The Stern Center for Language and Learning. For a schedule and list of participants or to volunteer, you can call 802-658-3328 or read all about it at burlingtonbookfestival.com. (Poets are bolded.)

Sat, Sep 24: Great Room, 3rd Floor, Main Street Landing’s Performing Arts Center, 60 Lake Street, Burlington, 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m..  POETRY IN THE SOCIAL SPHERE: Jon Turner.

Poet and veteran Jon Turner will talk about the benefits of artistic/poetic expression to help mend unseen wounds created by traumatic events-ie: war, rape, brutality and racism while discussing the ways poetry can also be used to raise awareness of environmental and political issues. Jon’s presentation centers around the issues of the side effects of post traumatic stress and traumatic brain injury-knowledge he gleaned from his time in battle overseas-along with the importance of creating a non judgmental sacred space among other human beings who have experienced trauma. Through discussion and prompts, the workshop will trigger a creative reaction enticing all to write and continue to create outside of the workshop element. Jon will additionally discuss the Warrior Writers Project and read some peaces from workshop participants. He’ll also share a bit of his story, read works from veterans and talk about his personal transformation through the process of writing.

Sat, Sep 24: Newport & White River Junction. 100 Thousand Poets for Change Poetry Gatherings.  Join other poets around the USA and across the planet in a demonstration/celebration of poetry to promote serious social, environmental, and political change, all unified under the name “100 Thousand Poets for Change.” For info, http://www.bigbridge.org/100thousandpoetsforchange/.

Sat, Sep 24: Church Street Marketplace, Burlington. 12:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.. INVASION OF THE ROVING POETS! Church Street is invaded throughout the afternoon by hordes of talented Champlain College bards engaging in public displays of poetry.  A urlington Book Fest event.

Sat, Sep 24: Film House, 3rd Floor, Main Street Landing’s Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 12:00 p.m. – 12:30 p.m.. The Beat Generation: Bill Morgan.

Bill Morgan is a painter and archival consultant working in New York City. His previous publications include The Works of Allen Ginsberg 1941-1994: A Descriptive Bibliography and Lawrence Ferlinghetti: a Comprehensive Bibliography. He has worked as an archivist for Allen Ginsberg, Abbie Hoffman and Timothy Leary. His latest work is entitled Beat Atlas: The Beat Generation in America and offers a state-by-state guide to the nation’s significant Beat locales. Beginning with Jack Kerouac’s Lowell, Beat Atlas takes us through the terrain mapped out in his novels, as well as to sites depicted by poets like Allen Ginsberg and Gary Snyder. From William Burroughs’ Lawrence, KS, to Neal Cassady’s Denver—and everywhere in between—Beat Atlas contains a wealth of historical information subdivided by region and state for easy reference and is illustrated with photographs by Ginsberg. It also follows the movements of Beat contemporaries like the New York School, the Black Mountain Poets and the San Francisco Renaissance. Rich with literary lore, Beat Atlas makes an ideal companion for armchair travelers as well as those “on the road.” A Burlington Book Fest event.

Sat, Sep 24: Great Room, 3rd Floor, Main Street Landing’s Performing Arts Center, 60 Lake Street, Burlington, 1:00 p.m. – 1: 30 p.m.. F.D. REEVE & LAURA C. STEVENSON: SCENES FROM A MARRIAGE.

Franklin D’Olier Reeve is an award-winning academic, writer, poet, Russian translator and editor. He is also the father of the late actor Christopher Reeve.

Reeve was an officer of the Poetry Society of America, the founding editor of Poetry Review, the secretary of Poets House in its formative years, and is now associated with the New York Quarterly. He has published approximately three dozen books of fiction, translations and poetry. His honors include the New England Poetry Society’s Golden Rose award and an award in literature from the American Academy National Institute of Arts and Letters.

His wife, Laura C. Stevenson, is an accomplished historian, novelist and author of young adult fiction. Her most recent novel, Return in Kind, is set in the fictitious town of Draper, Vermont and reflects upon the changes in the state’s landscape and residents from 1929 to 1971. Reviewed as “a highly intelligent, moving and humane novel,” the book is a study of loss – of hearing, of love, of a way of life.

In this intimate and special reading, F. D.  will join Laura to present Return in Kind and Laura will join her husband to read lines from his acclaimed new verse-play The Puzzle Master.  A Burlington Book Fest event.

Sat, Sep 24: Fletcher Room, Fletcher Free Library . Burlington, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.. STONEHENGE.  The BBF Stonehenge- just like the real one, but with words. This year’s BBF creative opportunity. Festival participants will have the chance to learn about and create a Stonehenge-a three-sentence prose haiku-and, working with guidance from editors and designers from the Champlain College Publishing Initiative, submit it for publication in an anthology of Stonehenges to be published later this fall.  A Burlington Book Fest event.

Sat, Sep 24: Hooker Dunham Theater, Brattleboro, 7:00 p.m. Vermont My Home: A Celebration – by T.Namaya.

T. Namaya, story-teller, poet, and humorist, will be on tour this Fall, with shows throughout Vermont.  The tour is called Vermont My Home: A Celebration! The show takes its name from Namaya’s recently released CD, Vermont My Home, based on his collection of stories, music, and poems celebrating the Green Mountain state, and the author’s home on Blue Heron Pond.

Namaya said, “The Vermont My Home tour is a celebration of this five-season paradise we call home. It is about the people, and some humorous anecdotes, such as the time my neighbor Josiah made a Zin pond for me.  The show and the CD celebrate our farms, the land, and the many reasons it is always Vermont Our Home.” The show also features Namaya’s stunning photographs of Southern Vermont.”  T.Namaya has performed around the world in Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and throughout the USA as a soloist and with his band The Jazz Beat Ensemble.  He has written three books of poetry: Eros to Godhead, GOD SEX POLITICS, and Vermont My Home, as well as a memoir called Journal of the Plague: Living and working with AIDS.  His play, Beatnik Café, was performed in New York and Boston, in 2010, to rave reviews. His art work, photography, and performance for peace, B 4 Peace Project, like the video Bring the Soldiers Home can be viewed at www.namayaproductions.com. He a community activist and an organizer for art and performance events, and created the Vermont Celebrates Hayden Carruth.

The CD and samples can be downloaded directly at http://www.vermontpoet.com/products-page/  Photos can be viewed at http://namayaproductions.com/photographydrawings/photos-of-vermont

The shows are benefiting various local and charitable organizations throughout the state of Vermont – The United Way agencies of Burlington, Montpelier and Brattleboro, and community services in Woodstock.  In Bennington, a portion of proceeds will help the South Western Medical Center’s Breast Cancer center.

Portion of proceeds from the tour support community development projects and peace education work through www.gracecares.com and www.vermontartpoetry.com.

Sun, Sep 25 (Last day): Burlington Book Festival. The city’s seventh annual celebration of the written word is on the way. September 23 through 25 enjoy readings, signings, panels, workshops, exhibits, musical performances, demos and special events featuring literary luminaries from around the world-and just around the corner! All events are free and open to the public. This year’s headliners include Elinor Lipman, Ed Koren, internationally acclaimed poet Marie Howe, Douglas Kennedy, C. D. Wright, David Macaulay, Spencer Quinn, Myla Goldberg, John Elder Robison, Cynthia Lord and current U.S. Poet Laureate Philip Levine.  The Burlington Book Festival is copresented by Burlington Magazine and The Stern Center for Language and Learning. For a schedule and list of participants or to volunteer, you can call 802-658-3328 or read all about it at burlingtonbookfestival.com. (Poets are bolded.)

Sun, Sep 25: Great Room, 3rd Floor, Main Street Landing’s Performing Arts Center, 60 Lake Street, Burlington, 11:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.. STEPHEN SANDY & EDIE RHOADS.

Stephen Sandy is the author of eleven previous poetry collections, most recently Weathers Permitting and Netsuke Days. He has taught at universities and workshops in Massachusetts, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont and has received, among other honors, a residency at the Bellagio Center, a Lannan Senior fellowship at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, a Fulbright Lectureship in Japan and an award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His latest collection is entitled Overlook.

Edie Rhoads lives and writes in Burlington. She earned an MFA through NYU’s creative writing fellowship. Her poems have appeared widely in such publications as New Letters, Crazyhorse, Post Road, Blackbird, The Salon and others. Edie’s first book of poems, entitled “The Day Bat”, was made possible by a Vermont Arts Council grant.  A Burlington Book Fest event.

Sun, Sep 25: Great Room, 3rd Floor, Main Street Landing’s Performing Arts Center, 60 Lake Street, Burlington, 11:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.. F.D. REEVE. A Burlington Book Fest event.

Franklin D’Olier Reeve is an award-winning academic, writer, poet, Russian translator and editor. He is also the father of the late actor Christopher Reeve.

Reeve was an officer of the Poetry Society of America, the founding editor of Poetry Review, the secretary of Poets House in its formative years, and is now associated with the New York Quarterly. He has published approximately three dozen books of fiction, translations and poetry. His honors include the New England Poetry Society’s Golden Rose award and an award in literature from the American Academy National Institute of Arts and Letters.

F. D. Reeve graduated from Princeton University (1950) and Columbia University (1958) and in 1961 was one of the first exchangees between the American Council of Learned Societies and the USSR Academy of Sciences. In 1962 he accompanied Robert Frost to Russia for his meeting with Nikita Khrushchev and served as Frost’s translator. After teaching at Columbia, Reeve moved to Wesleyan University, where he taught English and Russian literature for forty years. He is the founding editor of “Poetry Review.” Reeve has published approximately three dozen books of fiction, translations and poetry. His honors include the New England Poetry Society’s Golden Rose award and an award in literature from the American Academy National Institute of Arts and Letters.

Sun, Sep 25: Great Room, 3rd Floor, Main Street Landing’s Performing Arts Center, 60 Lake Street, Burlington, 12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.. PATRICIA FARGNOLI.  A Burlington Book Fest event.

Patricia Fargnoli, the New Hampshire Poet Laureate from December 2006 to March 2009, is the author of four books and two chapbooks of poetry. Her newest book, Then, Something, won the ForeWord Poetry Book of the Year Award Silver Award, the Shelia Mooton Book Award of the New England Poetry Club and an Honorable Mention in the Eric Hoffer Awards. Her fifth collection, Duties of the Spirit, won the New Hampshire Jane Kenyon Literary Book Award for an Outstanding Book of Poetry and was a semifinalist for the Glasgow Prize. Her first book, Necessary Light, was awarded the 1999 May Swenson Poetry Award.

She has been the recipient of a Macdowell Colony fellowship and an honorary BFA from The NH Institute of Arts and has won the Robert Frost Foundation Poetry Award and 6 Pushcart nominations. She has been published widely in literary journals such as Poetry, Ploughshares, The Harvard Review, Green Mountain Review, Alaska Quarterly and Massachusetts Review. She resides in Walpole, NH.

Sun, Sep 25: Great Room, 3rd Floor, Main Street Landing’s Performing Arts Center, 60 Lake Street, Burlington, 1:15 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.. DAVID BUDBILL.  A Burlington Book Fest event.

Copper Canyon Press published David Budbill’s newest book of poems, Happy Life, this month. Garrison Keillor reads frequently from David’s poems on NPR’s The Writer’s Almanac. David received his first Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from New England College in Henniker, New Hampshire, in 2009. Also in 2009, he was inducted as a Fellow into the Vermont Academy of Arts and Letters. In October he will receive the 2011 Kjell Meling Memorial Award for Distinction in the Arts & Humanities presented by Pennsylvania State University/Altoona. David’s other prizes and honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship in Poetry, a National Endowment for the Arts Play Writing Fellowship, The Dorothy Canfield Fisher Award for Fiction and The Vermont Arts Council’s Walter Cerf Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Arts. David lives in the southwest corner of Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom.

Sun, Sep 25: Great Room, 3rd Floor, Main Street Landing’s Performing Arts Center, 60 Lake Street, Burlington, 2:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.. C. D. WRIGHT.  A Burlington Book Fest event.

One of America’s most compelling and idiosyncratic poets, C.D. Wright ”belongs to a school of exactly one” (NY Times). Born and raised in the Ozark Mountains of Arkansas, she is a radically restless writer, a composer of hybrid works such as Deepstep Come Shining and distilled lyric collections such as Tremble. Every title takes her further inside her subjects and extends the means and measure of her reach. Wright is concerned with a density of language, setting up a chain reaction using the least amount of verbal material.

She has published a dozen collections, most recently, One With Others, winner of the 2010 National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry and finalist for the National Book Award. Rising, Falling, Hovering (2008) won the 2009 International Griffin Prize for Poetry. In 2007 Like Something Flying Backwards, New and Selected Poems was published in England. Her collaboration with photographer Deborah Luster, One Big Self: Prisoners of Louisiana was awarded the Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor Prize and a text edition was also released in 2007. Steal Away was on the international shortlist of the Griffin Trust Award. String Light won the 1992 Poetry Center Book Award.

Though her work is deeply connected to the Ozarks, Wright spent significant periods in New York and San Francisco before moving in 1983 to Rhode Island, where she teaches at Brown University. Among her other honors are a MacArthur Fellowship, a Lannan Literary Award, a Robert CreeleyAward and membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Sun, Sep 25: Great Room, 3rd Floor, Main Street Landing’s Performing Arts Center, 60 Lake Street, Burlington, 2:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.. POET LAUREATE OF THE UNITED STATES PHILIP LEVINE.   A Burlington Book Fest event.

Philip Levine “is a large, iconic Whitman of the industrial heartland” who, according to Edward Hirsch in the New York Times Book Review, should be considered “one of [America's]…quintessentially urban poets.” He was born in 1928 to Russian-Jewish immigrants in Detroit, a city that inspired much of his writing. Author of 20 collections of poetry, his most recent is News of The World (2009). The Simple Truth won the Pulitzer Prize in 1995. What Work Is won the National Book Award in 1991. David Baker writes, “What Work Is may be one of the most important books of poetry of our time. Poem after poem confronts the terribly damaged conditions of American labor, whose circumstance has perhaps never been more wrecked.” Levine is known as the poet of the working class and he remains dedicated to writing poetry “for people for whom there is no poetry.” As well as having received two National Book Awards, Levine is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Ruth Lily prize. He divides his time between Brooklyn, NY & Fresno, CA. The Library of Congress recently appointed Philip the new Poet Laureate of the United States.

Sun, Sep 25: Tune in on Sundays at 5:00 for the Write Action Radio Hour.  The program is broadcast from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. over WVEW FM-LP, 107.7. If you are outside of the broadcast area, you can listen on your computer through Internet streaming which is available at http://www.wvew.org. PLEASE NOTE THIS SHOW IS ON HOLD UNTIL THE RADIO STATION GETS BACK ON ITS FEET.

Wed, Sep 28: Burlington City Arts Center, 135 Church Street (side door, 2nd floor), Burlington, 8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. PoeJam.  The Burlington Poetry Jam is an open mic, mostly-poetry/spoken word event, with a little music, hosted by dug Nap, that takes place every other Wednesday night.  Created by Dug Nap.

Thu, Sep 29: Robert A. Jones ’59 Conference Room, Middlebury College, 4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.. Radicalities of an Undivided Intimacy (I Am My Favorite Poet) by Eduardo Espina, professor of Spanish, Texas A&M University. Professor Espina is the winner of the 2011 Guggenheim Fellowship for poetry. He is, with Charles Bernstein, editor of the quarterly S/N:New World Poetics. His poems have been translated into English, French, Italian, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Albanian, Romanian and Croatian. He is included in more than 30 anthologies of Latin American poetry. Sponsored by the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs, First Year Seminars.

Thu, Sep 29: Chellis House Dining Room, Middlebury College, 8:00 p.m. Anne Babson, award-winning poet and librettist, will be reading from her collection entitled THE WHITE TRASH PANTHEON, which sets the myths of ancient Greece in the American heartland. Filled with vernacular twang and humor gleaned from hthe deep South, combined with the high-literary sensibilities of a clacissist, these works have been featured on radio broadcasts as well as in Iowa Review, Cider Press Review, Connecticut Review. as well as other journals. They slap snooty smirks off the faces of any neo-classical predecessors in literature while breaking new ground in American feminist verse.

Thu, Sep 29: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m..  Patrizia Cavalli.

Patrizia Cavalli was born in Todi, Umbria, and lives in Rome. Since 1974, she has published five volumes of poetry with Einaudi, including Sempre aperto teatro, 1999 (Theatre Always Open) which won the prestigious Premio Viareggio Repaci and Pigre divinità e pigra sorte, 2006 (Lazy Gods and Lazy Fate) for which she received the Premio Internazionale Pasolini. Bilingual editions of her poems have been published in France, Canada, Mexico, and Germany. She has contributed to numerous magazines and reviews, including Poetry and The New Yorker. Describing her work in The Vintage Book of Contemporary World Verse (1996), J.D. McClatchy observed “her style is hard-bitten, on the edge. The circumstances of a poem, although private, are never merely personal, they reach out to larger, more abiding and vulnerable realities.” Giorgio Agamben has characterized her verses as “a prosody…expressed in the most fluent, seamless, and colloquial language of 20th century Italian poetry.” Cavalli also has translated Moliere’s Amphytrion, Wilde’s Salome, Shakespeare’s The Tempest, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Othello.

Sat, Oct 1: Goddard College, Pratt Center, 123 Pitkin Road, Plainfield, 7:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.. Faculty Reading. Ryan Boudinot, Walter Butts, Jocelyn Cullity, Jill Magi, and Sara Michas-Martin will read fiction, poetry, and non-fiction.  This first-ever BFA Faculty Reading is an opportunity to hear the work of the accomplished and talented writers who make Goddard College’s BFA in creative writing program the exciting program that it is!  Info, Michele Barber, 454-8311, michelle.barber@goddard.edu.

Sun, Oct 2: Tune in on Sundays at 5:00 for the Write Action Radio Hour.  The program is broadcast from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. over WVEW FM-LP, 107.7. If you are outside of the broadcast area, you can listen on your computer through Internet streaming which is available at http://www.wvew.org. PLEASE NOTE THIS SHOW IS ON HOLD UNTIL THE RADIO STATION GETS BACK ON ITS FEET.

Mon, Oct 3: Sherburne Memorial Library, 7:00 p.m..Killington Arts Guild’s A Gathering of Poets.  This is always a lively group, usually about 15 poets reading for 2-3 minutes each, then repeating the order, reading for another 2-3 minutes.  Refreshments.

Thu, Oct 6: Robert A. Jones ’59 Conference Room, Middlebury College, 4:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.. ANIMA: A BILINGUAL POETRY READING BY JOSÉ KOZER, TEXTS READ IN ENGLISH BY OLIVIA GRUGAN, ENGLISH TRANSLATIONS BY PETER BOYLE.

ANIMA DE JOSÉ KOZER: LECTURA BILINGÜE DE POESÍA, TEXTOS EN INGLÉS LEÍDOS POR OLIVIA GRUGAN, TRADUCCIONES AL INGLÉS DE PETER BOYLE.

Sat, Oct 8: Village Square Books, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.. 2nd Saturday Open Mic Poetry.

  • Hear local poets from the River Voices Writing Group
  • Bring your own original work to share or read from a favorite author
  • Listen to poetry

Once a month, we schedule Poetry readings.  These might be Open Mic Sessions, or Readings by published authors. The tables in the cafe are gathered together as each member of the group takes a turn reading poetry aloud in a fun environment.  Call (802-463-9404) or email us to participate as a reader or let us know that you’ll be attending as a listener.  Village Square Booksellers provides light refreshments during the event.

Sun, Oct 9: Tune in on Sundays at 5:00 for the Write Action Radio Hour.  The program is broadcast from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. over WVEW FM-LP, 107.7. If you are outside of the broadcast area, you can listen on your computer through Internet streaming which is available at http://www.wvew.org. PLEASE NOTE THIS SHOW IS ON HOLD UNTIL THE RADIO STATION GETS BACK ON ITS FEET.

Wed, Oct 12: Misty Valley Books, Main Street, On The Green, Chester, 7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m..  Michael Palma returns for a new poetry series: “Where the Heart Lies” – the poetry of Robert Browning.

This is the first of a 4-part series, on consecutive Wednesdays. The poetic reputation of Robert Browning (1812-1889) grew slowly over several decades, and for many years he was a specialized taste, highly esteemed by his fellow poets but largely unknown to the general public. (Even today, there are many who know him best as one half of a famous literary couple, whose romance and elopement were the basis for The Barretts of Wimpole Street.) He began to win a wider audience with the appearance of Men and Women (1855), his finest collection of shorter poems—whose concluding lyric provides the title for the series. His fame was consolidated by The Ring and the Book (1868-69), a rich psychological analysis of the principal figures in an actual murder case in seventeenth-century Italy.  Marked by intensity, compassion, and rare insight into human nature, Browning’s poems present the most varied and complex set of characters in English poetry since the plays of Shakespeare. He is the acknowledged master of the dramatic monologue, a poem in which a character speaks directly to another—and to the reader—revealing the deepest needs and often the most lurid impulses of the human heart. At least one outstanding example, “My Last Duchess,” is known to everyone who has taken a high-school English class.  Info, 875-3400.

Wed, Oct 12: Burlington City Arts Center, 135 Church Street (side door, 2nd floor), Burlington, 8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. PoeJam.  The Burlington Poetry Jam is an open mic, mostly-poetry/spoken word event, with a little music, hosted by dug Nap, that takes place every other Wednesday night.  Created by Dug Nap.

Fri, Oct 14 – Sun, Oct 16: Brattleboro Literary Festival. The Brattleboro Literary Festival celebrates its 10th anniversary with over 40 emerging and established authors in readings and special events. Featured authors include fiction authors André Aciman, Julia Alvarez, Richard Bausch, Anthony Doerr (winner- 2011 Story Prize), Téa Obreht (winner – 2011 Orange Prize) and Luis Alberto Urrea; poets Stephen Dobyns, Mark Doty (winner -2008 National Book Award) Monica Youn and Kevin Young, Caldecott Award-winner and Norwich, VT resident David Macaulay; and NPR personalities Tom Bodett and Roy Blount, Jr. Free and open to the public. Info, www.brattleboroliteraryfestival.org.  (Poets are bolded.)

Sat, Oct 15: Poetry Society of Vermont’s Annual Fall Meeting, Luncheon & Workshop.  Location TBD.  Info, http://www.poetrysocietyofvermont.org/.

Sun, Oct 16: Tune in on Sundays at 5:00 for the Write Action Radio Hour.  The program is broadcast from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. over WVEW FM-LP, 107.7. If you are outside of the broadcast area, you can listen on your computer through Internet streaming which is available at http://www.wvew.org. PLEASE NOTE THIS SHOW IS ON HOLD UNTIL THE RADIO STATION GETS BACK ON ITS FEET.

Mon, Oct 17: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m..  D. A. Powell.  D. A. Powell is the author of Tea, Lunch and Cocktails. His most recent collection, Chronic, was a finalist for the Publishing Triangle and the National Book Critics Circle Awards. Along with David Trinidad and a cast of hundreds, he is the co-author of By Myself: An Autobiography (Turtle Point, 2009). Powell’s honors have included fellowships from the Millay Colony, the National Endowment for the Arts and the James Michener Foundation, as well as a Pushcart Prize, the Lyric Poetry Award from the Poetry Society of America and an Academy of American Poets Prize. In 2010, he received the Kingsley Tufts Prize from Claremont University. D. A. Powell’s work appears in numerous anthologies, including Norton’s American Hybrids, Legitimate Dangers: Poets of the New Century and Best American Poetry 1998. His recent poems appear in Kenyon Review, Quarterly West, American Poetry Review, New England Review and Virginia Quarterly Review. Powell has taught at Columbia University, the University of Iowa’s Iowa Writers’ Workshop and New England College. A former Briggs-Copeland Lecturer in Poetry at Harvard University, he now teaches full-time in the English Department at University of San Francisco.

Wed, Oct 19: Misty Valley Books, Main Street, On The Green, Chester, 7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m..  Michael Palma returns for a new poetry series: “Where the Heart Lies” – the poetry of Robert Browning.

This is the second of a 4-part series, on consecutive Wednesdays. The poetic reputation of Robert Browning (1812-1889) grew slowly over several decades, and for many years he was a specialized taste, highly esteemed by his fellow poets but largely unknown to the general public. (Even today, there are many who know him best as one half of a famous literary couple, whose romance and elopement were the basis for The Barretts of Wimpole Street.) He began to win a wider audience with the appearance of Men and Women (1855), his finest collection of shorter poems—whose concluding lyric provides the title for the series. His fame was consolidated by The Ring and the Book (1868-69), a rich psychological analysis of the principal figures in an actual murder case in seventeenth-century Italy.  Marked by intensity, compassion, and rare insight into human nature, Browning’s poems present the most varied and complex set of characters in English poetry since the plays of Shakespeare. He is the acknowledged master of the dramatic monologue, a poem in which a character speaks directly to another—and to the reader—revealing the deepest needs and often the most lurid impulses of the human heart. At least one outstanding example, “My Last Duchess,” is known to everyone who has taken a high-school English class.  Info, 875-3400.

Sun, Oct 23: Tune in on Sundays at 5:00 for the Write Action Radio Hour.  The program is broadcast from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. over WVEW FM-LP, 107.7. If you are outside of the broadcast area, you can listen on your computer through Internet streaming which is available at http://www.wvew.org.

Wed, Oct 26: Misty Valley Books, Main Street, On The Green, Chester, 7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m..  Michael Palma returns for a new poetry series: “Where the Heart Lies” – the poetry of Robert Browning.

This is the third of a 4-part series, on consecutive Wednesdays. The poetic reputation of Robert Browning (1812-1889) grew slowly over several decades, and for many years he was a specialized taste, highly esteemed by his fellow poets but largely unknown to the general public. (Even today, there are many who know him best as one half of a famous literary couple, whose romance and elopement were the basis for The Barretts of Wimpole Street.) He began to win a wider audience with the appearance of Men and Women (1855), his finest collection of shorter poems—whose concluding lyric provides the title for the series. His fame was consolidated by The Ring and the Book (1868-69), a rich psychological analysis of the principal figures in an actual murder case in seventeenth-century Italy.  Marked by intensity, compassion, and rare insight into human nature, Browning’s poems present the most varied and complex set of characters in English poetry since the plays of Shakespeare. He is the acknowledged master of the dramatic monologue, a poem in which a character speaks directly to another—and to the reader—revealing the deepest needs and often the most lurid impulses of the human heart. At least one outstanding example, “My Last Duchess,” is known to everyone who has taken a high-school English class.  Info, 875-3400.

Wed, Oct 26: Burlington City Arts Center, 135 Church Street (side door, 2nd floor), Burlington, 8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. PoeJam.  The Burlington Poetry Jam is an open mic, mostly-poetry/spoken word event, with a little music, hosted by dug Nap, that takes place every other Wednesday night.  Created by Dug Nap.

Sun, Oct 30: Tune in on Sundays at 5:00 for the Write Action Radio Hour.  The program is broadcast from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. over WVEW FM-LP, 107.7. If you are outside of the broadcast area, you can listen on your computer through Internet streaming which is available at http://www.wvew.org.

Wed, Nov 2: Misty Valley Books, Main Street, On The Green, Chester, 7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m..  Michael Palma returns for a new poetry series: “Where the Heart Lies” – the poetry of Robert Browning.

This is the last of a 4-part series, on consecutive Wednesdays. The poetic reputation of Robert Browning (1812-1889) grew slowly over several decades, and for many years he was a specialized taste, highly esteemed by his fellow poets but largely unknown to the general public. (Even today, there are many who know him best as one half of a famous literary couple, whose romance and elopement were the basis for The Barretts of Wimpole Street.) He began to win a wider audience with the appearance of Men and Women (1855), his finest collection of shorter poems—whose concluding lyric provides the title for the series. His fame was consolidated by The Ring and the Book (1868-69), a rich psychological analysis of the principal figures in an actual murder case in seventeenth-century Italy.  Marked by intensity, compassion, and rare insight into human nature, Browning’s poems present the most varied and complex set of characters in English poetry since the plays of Shakespeare. He is the acknowledged master of the dramatic monologue, a poem in which a character speaks directly to another—and to the reader—revealing the deepest needs and often the most lurid impulses of the human heart. At least one outstanding example, “My Last Duchess,” is known to everyone who has taken a high-school English class.  Info, 875-3400.

Wed, Nov 2: Goodrich Memorial Library, 202 Main Street, Newport, 7:00 p.m. Words, Creativity, and Spirituality. Drawing from Emily Dickinson and Annie Dillard, Dartmouth Professor Nancy Jay Crumbine examines the interconnection between creativity and spirituality.  A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Goodrich Memorial Library.  Info, 649-1184.

Fri, Nov 4: Capital Plaza Hotel, Montpelier (time TBA).  Vermont Poet Laureate Appointment Ceremony.  Celebration to officially recognize Sydney Lea as Vermont’s new state Poet Laureate.  This event will be in conjunction with when Governor Shumlin is giving the Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts.

Sat, Nov 5: 250th Celebration at Broadbrook Grange, Guilford, 7:00 p.m. Vermont My Home: A Celebration – by T.Namaya.  T. Namaya, story-teller, poet, and humorist, will be on tour this Fall, with shows throughout Vermont.  The tour is called Vermont My Home: A Celebration! The show takes its name from Namaya’s recently released CD, Vermont My Home, based on his collection of stories, music, and poems celebrating the Green Mountain state, and the author’s home on Blue Heron Pond.

Namaya said, “The Vermont My Home tour is a celebration of this five-season paradise we call home. It is about the people, and some humorous anecdotes, such as the time my neighbor Josiah made a Zin pond for me.  The show and the CD celebrate our farms, the land, and the many reasons it is always Vermont Our Home.” The show also features Namaya’s stunning photographs of Southern Vermont.”  T.Namaya has performed around the world in Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and throughout the USA as a soloist and with his band The Jazz Beat Ensemble.  He has written three books of poetry: Eros to Godhead, GOD SEX POLITICS, and Vermont My Home, as well as a memoir called Journal of the Plague: Living and working with AIDS.  His play, Beatnik Café, was performed in New York and Boston, in 2010, to rave reviews. His art work, photography, and performance for peace, B 4 Peace Project, like the video Bring the Soldiers Home can be viewed at www.namayaproductions.com. He a community activist and an organizer for art and performance events, and created the Vermont Celebrates Hayden Carruth.

The CD and samples can be downloaded directly at http://www.vermontpoet.com/products-page/  Photos can be viewed at http://namayaproductions.com/photographydrawings/photos-of-vermont.

The shows are benefiting various local and charitable organizations throughout the state of Vermont – The United Way agencies of Burlington, Montpelier and Brattleboro, and community services in Woodstock.  In Bennington, a portion of proceeds will help the South Western Medical Center’s Breast Cancer center.

Portion of proceeds from the tour support community development projects and peace education work through www.gracecares.com and www.vermontartpoetry.com.

Sun, Nov 6: Tune in on Sundays at 5:00 for the Write Action Radio Hour.  The program is broadcast from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. over WVEW FM-LP, 107.7. If you are outside of the broadcast area, you can listen on your computer through Internet streaming which is available at http://www.wvew.org.

Wed, Nov 9: Burlington City Arts Center, 135 Church Street (side door, 2nd floor), Burlington, 8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. PoeJam.  The Burlington Poetry Jam is an open mic, mostly-poetry/spoken word event, with a little music, hosted by dug Nap, that takes place every other Wednesday night.  Created by Dug Nap.

Sat, Nov 12: Village Square Books, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.. 2nd Saturday Open Mic Poetry.

  • Hear local poets from the River Voices Writing Group
  • Bring your own original work to share or read from a favorite author
  • Listen to poetry

Once a month, we schedule Poetry readings.  These might be Open Mic Sessions, or Readings by published authors. The tables in the cafe are gathered together as each member of the group takes a turn reading poetry aloud in a fun environment.  Call (802-463-9404) or email us to participate as a reader or let us know that you’ll be attending as a listener.  Village Square Booksellers provides light refreshments during the event.

Sun, Nov 13: Tune in on Sundays at 5:00 for the Write Action Radio Hour.  The program is broadcast from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. over WVEW FM-LP, 107.7. If you are outside of the broadcast area, you can listen on your computer through Internet streaming which is available at http://www.wvew.org.

Sun, Nov 20: Tune in on Sundays at 5:00 for the Write Action Radio Hour.  The program is broadcast from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. over WVEW FM-LP, 107.7. If you are outside of the broadcast area, you can listen on your computer through Internet streaming which is available at http://www.wvew.org.

Wed, Nov 23: Burlington City Arts Center, 135 Church Street (side door, 2nd floor), Burlington, 8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. PoeJam.  The Burlington Poetry Jam is an open mic, mostly-poetry/spoken word event, with a little music, hosted by dug Nap, that takes place every other Wednesday night.  Created by Dug Nap.

Sun, Nov 27: Tune in on Sundays at 5:00 for the Write Action Radio Hour.  The program is broadcast from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. over WVEW FM-LP, 107.7. If you are outside of the broadcast area, you can listen on your computer through Internet streaming which is available at http://www.wvew.org.

Sun, Nov 27: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m..  Lorna Goodison.

Lorna Goodison was born in Jamaica, and has received much recognition and many awards for her writing in both poetry and prose, including the Commonwealth Poetry Prize (Americas Region), the Musgrave Gold Medal from Jamaica, and most recently one of Canada’s largest literary prizes, the British Columbia National Award for Canadian Non-Fiction for From Harvey River: A Memoir of My Mother and Her People. Her work has been included in the major anthologies and collections of contemporary poetry published in the United States, Europe and the West Indies over the past fifteen years, most recently in the Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry (2003) as well as the HarperCollins World Reader, the Vintage Book of Contemporary World Poetry, and the Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces. Her work has also been translated into several languages, and published widely in magazines from the Hudson Review to MS Magazine. Her paintings have been exhibited throughout the Americas and in Europe; and she has published three collections of short stories, including Baby Mother and the King of Swords (Longman,1990) and Fool-Fool Rose is Leaving Labour-in-Vain Savannah (Kingston: Ian Randle Publishers, 2005). Her books of poetry include Tamarind Season (Kingston: Institute of Jamaica,1980), I Am Becoming My Mother (London: New Beacon, 1986), Heartease (London: New Beacon, 1988), Selected Poems (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1992), To Us, All Flowers Are Roses (Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1995), Turn Thanks (Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1999), Guinea Woman: New and Selected Poems (Manchester: Carcanet, 2000), Travelling Mercies (Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 2001), Controlling the Silver (Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2005), Goldengrove: New and Selected Poems (Manchester: Carcanet, 2006).  Her latest book, From Harvey River: A Memoir of My Mother and her People, was published in Canada by McClelland and Stewart in 2007, in the United States by Harper Collins/Amistad, and in the United Kingdom by Atlantic Books. Her latest book is a collection of short stories, By Love Possessed (Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 2011)

She has been a central figure at festivals such as Poetry International at the South Bank Centre in London, England; the Harbourfront International Poetry Festival in Toronto; the Poetry Africa Festival in Durban, South Africa; the National Black Writers Conference in New York; the Interlit International Conference in Erlanger, Germany; Poetry International in Rotterdam; the Cuirt Literary Festival in Galway and the Aldeburgh Poetry Festival in England. In the past couple of years, she has given readings at Cambridge University and the Sorbonne, Paris; delivered the Dame Nita Barrow Memorial Lecture at the University of the West Indies and the Frank Collymore Lecture in Barbados; and participated in a celebration of Fifty Years of Poetry at Radcliffe at the Bunting Institute in Harvard University. She has also read at schools, cultural centres, hospitals–in rural as well as urban communities–throughout the world.

Lorna Goodison has taught at the University of Toronto, as well as at the University of Miami Caribbean Summer Institute, the University of the West Indies Caribbean Writers Program, the Sitka Summer Institute in Alaska. She has also conducted special workshops in the United States, Canada, Europe and the West Indies. She divides her time between Kingston, Jamaica; Toronto and Halfmoon Bay, British Columbia; and teaches in the Department of English and the Centre for African and Afroamerican Studies at the University of Michigan, where she is the Lemuel A. Johnson Collegiate Professor.

Wed, Nov 30: Ilsley Library, Main Street, Middlebury, 3:00 p.m.  Ted Scheu, That Poetry Guy!  Ted, a children’s writer and teacher, provides his usual (unusual!) youth program, with wonderful juvenile poetry.  Don’t miss this event!  Info on Ted: http://www.poetryguy.com/about.php.

Sun, Dec 4: Tune in on Sundays at 5:00 for the Write Action Radio Hour.  The program is broadcast from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. over WVEW FM-LP, 107.7. If you are outside of the broadcast area, you can listen on your computer through Internet streaming which is available at http://www.wvew.org.

Wed, Dec 7: Burlington City Arts Center, 135 Church Street (side door, 2nd floor), Burlington, 8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. PoeJam.  The Burlington Poetry Jam is an open mic, mostly-poetry/spoken word event, with a little music, hosted by dug Nap, that takes place every other Wednesday night.  Created by Dug Nap.

Sat, Dec 10: Village Square Books, 32 The Square, Bellows Falls, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.. 2nd Saturday Open Mic Poetry.

  • Hear local poets from the River Voices Writing Group
  • Bring your own original work to share or read from a favorite author
  • Listen to poetry

Once a month, we schedule Poetry readings.  These might be Open Mic Sessions, or Readings by published authors. The tables in the cafe are gathered together as each member of the group takes a turn reading poetry aloud in a fun environment.  Call (802-463-9404) or email us to participate as a reader or let us know that you’ll be attending as a listener.  Village Square Booksellers provides light refreshments during the event.

Sun, Dec 11: Tune in on Sundays at 5:00 for the Write Action Radio Hour.  The program is broadcast from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. over WVEW FM-LP, 107.7. If you are outside of the broadcast area, you can listen on your computer through Internet streaming which is available at http://www.wvew.org.

Mon, Dec 12: Vermont Studio Center, 80 Pearl Street, Johnson, 8:00 p.m..  Cyrus Cassells. Cyrus Cassells is the author of four acclaimed books of poetry: The Mud Actor, Soul Make a Path through Shouting, Beautiful Signor, and More Than Peace and Cypresses. His fifth book, The Crossed-Out Swastika, and a translation manuscript, Still Life with Children: Selected Poems of Francesc Parcerisas, are forthcoming. Among his honors are a Lannan Literary Award, a William Carlos Williams Award, a Pushcart Prize, two NEA grants, and a Lambda Literary Award. He is a tenured Professor of English at Texas State University-San Marcos and has served on the faculty of Cave Canem, the African American Poets Workshop. He divides his time between Austin, New York City, and Paris, and works on occasion in Barcelona as a translator of Catalan poetry.

Sun, Dec 18: Tune in on Sundays at 5:00 for the Write Action Radio Hour.  The program is broadcast from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. over WVEW FM-LP, 107.7. If you are outside of the broadcast area, you can listen on your computer through Internet streaming which is available at http://www.wvew.org.

Wed, Dec 21: Burlington City Arts Center, 135 Church Street (side door, 2nd floor), Burlington, 8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. PoeJam.  The Burlington Poetry Jam is an open mic, mostly-poetry/spoken word event, with a little music, hosted by dug Nap, that takes place every other Wednesday night.  Created by Dug Nap.

Sun, Dec 25: Tune in on Sundays at 5:00 for the Write Action Radio Hour.  The program is broadcast from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. over WVEW FM-LP, 107.7. If you are outside of the broadcast area, you can listen on your computer through Internet streaming which is available at http://www.wvew.org.

2012

Thu, Apr 4: Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main Street, Brattleboro, 7:00 p.m.. An Evening of Latin American Poetry. Amherst College professor Ilan Stavans considers poems by Rubén Darío, Jorge Luis Borges, Gabriela Mistral, Pablo Neruda, Octavio Paz, and others—parts of a tradition in which words are mechanisms of resistance against oppression.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Info, Jerry Carbone, (802) 254-5290 x101.

Thu, Apr 4: Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main St, Montpelier, 7:00 p.m.. They Do Still Write Them the Way They Used To. Refuting the notion that modern poetry is formless and self-absorbed, poet Michael Palma considers contemporary poets who use rhyme, meter, and figurative language to explore timeless, universal themes.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Kellogg-Hubbard Library.  Info, Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338.

Thu, Apr 4: April 4 — Rutland Free Library, 10 Court St, Rutland, 7:00 p.m..  Poetry’s Spiritual Language. Using the poetry of Dickinson, Kenyon, Rumi, and Kabir—poets from diverse religious traditions—poet Nancy Jay Crumbine examines poetry’s language of spirituality.  A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Rutland Free Library. Info, Paula Baker, 773-1860.

  • Again, if you become aware of an event that isn’t posted above, please let me know. My apologies if I have left off anything of importance to any of you, but it can always be corrected in the next Vermont Poetry Newsletter.

La poesía
es la ruptura instantánea
instantáneamente cicatrizada
abierta de nuevo
por la mirada de los otros

Poetry
is a sudden rupture
suddenly healed
and torn open again
by the glances of the others

  •  Octavio Paz

“One of the obligations of the writer, and perhaps especially of the poet, is to say or sing all that he or she can, to deal with as much of the world as becomes possible to him or her in language.”

  •  Denise Levertov

Your Fellow Poet,
Ron Lewis

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